I've Lost My Mind and I Can't Remember Where I Put It

What would an extra year or so of life be worth to you? Now don't get the wrong idea, I am not the devil. There will be no bargaining for your soul at the end of this article. If I do , however, show you how to gain the extra year or so and you feel compelled to send me a Ferrari or the number of a Swiss bank account, I will understand.

Let me hasten to add that I am not a doctor--even if you count that one semester of graduate study in medical school--and I am not a psychologist--a BA in psychology doth not a licensed practitioner make. However, I am a driven student in the school of experience and I have trained myself to see humor in the most mundane and maddening of circumstances. This has led to the incidental discovery of many secrets to life along the way.

One of the more useful secrets came out of one of life's most vexing and often humorous human frailties: Forgetting where you put things.

Ever lose your car keys and can't remember where you put them? Have you ever been working with an important piece of paper and without going more than five feet have it disappear and have to spend hours looking for it? Is it time to leave for school and your child's homework, gym shorts, backpack, shoes, school book etc. is nowhere to be found? Have you ever been cleaning up and later can't remember where you stored that now all-important item?

Americans are said to spend on average 55.2 minutes a day looking for things. That means:

One out of every twenty five years is wasted looking for things.

PricewaterhouseCoopers has published this study on the time and money spent on paper in today’s typical organization:

  • Of all the pages that get handled each day in the average office, 90 percent are merely shuffled.
  • The average document gets copied 19 times.
  • Companies spend $20 in labor to file a document, $120 in labor to find a misfiled document, and $220 in labor to reproduce a lost document.
  • 7.5 percent of all documents get lost, 3 percent of the remainder get misfiled.
  • Professionals spend 5-15 percent of their time reading information, and up to 50 percent of their time looking for it.

If you are a professional whose average billing rate is $80 to $100 per hour, spending even 20% of your time looking for files or reports is almost $40,000 a year in wasted time. Mulltiply that by the number of professionals in the company and the loss could be catastrophic.

Looked at in another way, any secrets that can help diminish this percentage can add up to a lot of Ferrari's (hint hint.)

Ok, so you are not a professional, but your life is severely hampered by the loss of time and energy looking for your keys and your children's shoes--not to mention the signed permission letter for their field trip. What can you do to trim this time waste and save you from losing your mind?

First, a little discussion of how the mind works. Did I say the mind is lazy? Maybe lazy is not the best word--the mind is selfish. Whatever protects the body or helps it do an important task takes precedence over activities that are merely routine.

Take the lost keys for example: When you removed the keys from the ignition, that was a relatively important act. Carrying them or releasing them is not nearly as important as the next activity the mind is preoccupied with. That brings us to the first memory principle:

The Point of Departure or POD Principle. This is the point in your day when the hands that were carrying or handling the item took on another task. The laying down of the keys is not nearly as important to the mind as the box or bag of groceries your hands now have to pick up or handle. More graphically, who cares where the keys went if you have to catch your toddler from falling off the table. The mind made no mental note of that action at all--only the catching of the child.

This in itself is very, very helpful. Merely retracing your steps and asking yourself, what task did my hands take on right after I had the keys in my hand. With practice, you will find this easier and easier to do until in your mind you will picture the box you moved, the groceries you picked up or the spill you cleaned up.

These locations are what I call PODs--the point of departure where the hands did something else. Ninety percent of the time you will find the keys where you "Podded" it.

I once had to drive a great distance to pick up emergency supplies for my company. Two big containers. After placing them in the trunk of the car I went to open the car to drive home---you guessed it, my hands were much too preoccupied placing the two containers so they wouldn't spill to notice I let go of what was in them--the keys.

I could have avoided that embarrassment and time waster if I had used the second principle of memory: Mental Post-its.

Since the mind cares about what the hands grab and doesn't care about the putting down of stuff, it is up to you to make it care. How do you do that, you ask? I have started training myself to make a mental note when I put things down. I say to myself as I am in the motion of putting it down, "I am putting this here" and focus on where I place my keys as if I am putting a mental Post-it there. I find that the brain does not mind remembering that because you have given the otherwise meaningless act importance.

Now, if I had used that principle when I put the containers in my trunk, I would have gone one step further and said to myself--better to put them in my pocket first. That illustrates the third memory principle: Memory Sanctuaries.

A sanctuary is a place that is safe. A Memory Sanctuary is a designated place that you will always look first for something and if it is there, you have saved yourself time and frustration. For your child's shoes or schoolwork, you might have a designated shelf or box that they are faithfully placed rather than on a table or floor or under the bed. To help you determine what goes into the Sanctuary, make a list of all the things you waste time looking for. Hopefully, that list will get smaller and smaller as you use these memory principles.

A husband came home to find his wife near tears and asked what was wrong. "I can't find my keys!" she said. "I looked all over the house and in the car and didn't find them." "Did you look in your purse?" he asked. "No." she replied. "Why not?" "Because if they're not there I'll just die!"

In your office, when you are working with a document, always keep it either on a clipboard or a designated part of your desk or counter that is your Sanctuary location. If you put it down somewhere else, the fourth principle can save you: Memory Markers

One of my managers took my advice and made some little bright-red paper tents that he places on top of his papers or project if he has to leave for another task. When it's time to return to the original project, he merely looks for the Memory Marker. Many times, after he is distracted, the sight of the Marker reminds him of the abandoned task and it helps to keep him on track for the work day.

Tying a colorful yarn or ribbon to your keys could help you to remember to Mentally Post-it or merely be an aid when you are looking.

While these four principles are extremely helpful and will save you many Ferrari's worth of time and frustration, one of my favorite quotes attributed to Confucious illustrates a life principle:The palest ink is mightier than the strongest memory.

Write down where you store things in a journal you keep in your Memory Sanctuary. Label and list the contents of storage boxes. Keep a diagram of kitchen items and tool locations. For papers you need to refer to, try scanning them and keeping them in a Memory Sanctuary computer file with a flash drive as a back up.

If you have any tips or aids that have helped you, feel free to leave a comment. If you have questions, leave those too and I promise to get back to you just as soon as I figure out how to get my laptop and car keys out of the trunk. =:)



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Comments 80 comments

drbj profile image

drbj 6 years ago from south Florida

Great hub, Winsome, with excellent mnemonic techniques to help us remember.

Like it so well I plan to send you a brand new Ferrari ... keychain. If I can remember where I put it.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Lol. Thanks Doc. Look at me, I used to not be able to spell mnemonic and now I are one. =:)


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca

Love this, Winsome! You are one hell of a writer.

I'll make a mental note of that.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Much appreciated Lorlie. My Mental Post-its all stuck together and I can't read the bottom ones, but I think I have cleaning to pick up. =:)


sheila b. profile image

sheila b. 6 years ago

Actually, your title is something I've thought once in a while...I'm organized, seldom lose things, but occasionally I don't note where I parked my car in a large parking lot. And my car is little, easily hidden behind others. I feel like such a fool, walking up and down the lanes looking for my car. One thing I did, though, is put some colorful flowers in the back window. That way, I easily identify my car. Before I did that, I had, a couple of times. tried to get into some other little blue car. Oh, God, I'm sounding like such an idiiot, I'd better go...


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Lol. It's such a sight to see someone walking aimlessly down row after row pointing their key beeper in the air like some impotent magic wand, trying to coax their steed into response, a vacant, helpless look on their face--oh no, that was me. =:)


Green Lotus profile image

Green Lotus 6 years ago from Atlanta, GA

Great fun Hub Winsome. I love the statistics as it makes me feel more normal :)


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Thanks GL. Until these fancy memory aids, I had a saying: Don't bother me with things I've forgotten, I can barely keep up with the things I remember. =:)


kowality profile image

kowality 6 years ago from Everywhere

Uh..what did you say Winsome??? Being in Vancouver BC does not help..lol Awesome Hub


Katrina Ariel profile image

Katrina Ariel 6 years ago from The Highlands of British Columbia, Canada

These are GREAT tips! Well written article too. Nice hub!


ainehannah profile image

ainehannah 6 years ago from Dublin

Great hub and I love "Don't bother me with things I've forgotten, I can barely keep up with the things I remember. =:)" too :0)


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

John, you mean you can still forget in that clean fresh Vancouver air? Thanks for stopping by and for your comment.

Katrina, that is very much appreciated coming from a super wholeness professional such as you. Thank you.

Ainehannah, ha ha, yes and if it's really important we'll probably get a reminder in the mail. =:)


Gigi2 profile image

Gigi2 6 years ago from UK

I am so going to take all these tips on board. I lost my 1 remaining car key a couple of weeks ago, it cost me £219 for a replacement! I need all the help I can get. Brilliant hub, thanks, it's bookmarked!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

You are so welcome Gigi. I love it when UK hubbers stop by--you get wonderful comments like "Brilliant" whether or not you are. =:)


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 6 years ago from United States

Winsome, Great article and suggestions.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Pamela, thank you. I hope they will keep you out of the troubles I used to have. =:)


SusanAdele profile image

SusanAdele 6 years ago

Wonderful Hub. Not only informative, but written with great humor. Love it.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Thank you Susan. How could you not laugh at such ridiculous situations that forgetfulness brings us? It reminds me of the old joke:

When you get older, two things start to happen:

You begin to forget things and

the other is....the other is.... =:)


katiem2 profile image

katiem2 6 years ago from I'm outta here

Winsome, Awesome and the writing your a great writer and I become a better one just reading your work... NOW where was I and what was I going to say...hmmm OH Yea, great hub and now I don't feel so weird or as my Mom once said, "Scattered Brained ... I really enjoyed reading this had to rate it UP and will have to read it again and nail down some useful techniques. Thanks and Peace :)


Cathi Sutton profile image

Cathi Sutton 6 years ago

Great Hub! I am constantly looking for something I just had in my hand! I think I will start to use your suggestions right away! I also enjoyed the humor in this Hub and will be sending you your new car as soon as you forward the shipping charges!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Katie, I always enjoyed that phrase--scatterbrained. I could easily identify with it whenever I was distracted and forgot things. I think sometimes we are not so much scattered as multi-tasking without a script. =:) Thank you for your comment.

Cathi, Ha Ha. You just name the place and I'll fly out to drive it back myself. Can you imagine the tickets I could accumulate speeding from your neck of the woods all of the way to California. =:)


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 6 years ago

It's so a part of our lives! Thank you!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

My pleasure Micky. It is a part of our lives--the part we wonder where it went. =:)


Granny's House profile image

Granny's House 6 years ago from Older and Hopefully Wiser Time

Great hub. I too find myself looking for my keys etc. I just marked it up to old age! lol. I see I am not alone


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha Ha Granny, thanks for your comment. I used think I was alone sometimes, then I remembered where I left the kids. =:)


the pink umbrella profile image

the pink umbrella 6 years ago from the darkened forest deep within me.

you know i didn't have that forgetttful thing until i was pregnant. Even now a year and 4 motnhs later i have held onto that forgetfullness. Thanks for the tips, and ill try putting them into practice.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hey Pink, thanks for coming by. Hope they help you let go of that forgetfulness. =:)


Feline Prophet profile image

Feline Prophet 6 years ago from India

Oh dear...I had a really smart comment but now I can't remember how it went! And where it went! :D


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

I found it, it was right here by your car keys...and you are right it was very funny, it's giggling at me as we speak uhh type. Something about your memory improving by eating brain food or your brain improving by eating memory food. Anyway, thank you for stopping by, I'll send you your keys right after Shiela B. finishes trying them in her car door. =:)


Springboard profile image

Springboard 6 years ago from Wisconsin

The "point of departure principle." lol. I love it. It fits my life exactly. My short term memory is muck at best. I always accredit it to the fact that my mind seems to go a million miles a minute at times, and so my brain has a tendency to push out a lot of little stuff to make room for new stuff, and in that the mind just goes caput on something thought, spoken, or done just moments before.

Take, for example, having taken my wife to work the other day. Her car has been in the shop and so I've been driving her. Before we left in the morning she reminded me, "I'm off at 4 today. Not 4:30."

"Yep. Got it."

"4 pm."

"Yeah. I'll be there..."

Got home, took care of business. 4:05 the phone rings. The wife simply says "Hi."

I sigh. The mind conjures up an old memory from just hours before. All I could simply say was "I'm on my way."

"Yeah. Thanks," says my wife.

At least now I know there's a name for the malady that plagues me so. I should check under the Obama health care plan to see if I can get something for that...

I'm sure it would be better than what my wife gave me for it. :)


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Lol Springboard. That was a great story and I'm sure every spouse reading it will say to themselves: "Been there." Glad you got some help from the article...and don't forget to get bread, milk, eggs and dog food. =:)


2patricias profile image

2patricias 6 years ago from Sussex by the Sea

Hi Winsome, This is a great Hub - Pat wishes she had read it last year when she lost her emerald ring. It eventually turned up in her 'gardening' drawer (several months later).

Here is another tip we have learned:

If you decide to (say) rearrange your kitchen, make a note of the new storing place of items you don't use very often. This idea is courtesy Pat's step-mom and we have found it has saved us some time. If the kitchen really is your problem area - make a note and put it inside a cupboard door.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hey Pat's, thanks for stopping by. A note inside the door is a great idea. The last time I looked at mine there was a note that said "Didn't you already look here?" =:)


Sky321 profile image

Sky321 6 years ago from Canada

Very interesting hub! I love articles like this.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Sky, thank you. One of my favorite things to write about are things that are needful but also something we all have trouble with and can laugh about it. This subject is perfect for that. =:)


truster profile image

truster 6 years ago from A Bed of Roses

Losing your mind is a terrible thing! More so if you lose it because of others. LOL!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha ha, yes Truster, you know they say craziness is contagious, we catch it from our kids. =:) Thank you for your comment.


Petra Vlah profile image

Petra Vlah 6 years ago from Los Angeles

Great hints on saving time while hoping for a Ferrari at the end of a frustrating well programmed boring life; just kidding


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha ha, Petra--yes we work so hard at organizing, programming and getting our work day in shape we deserve a Ferrari don't we? =:) Thank you for your comment.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 6 years ago from Central Oklahoma

Having kids in the house used to be my excuse when things weren't where I put them. Which actually was true 70% of the time, as in "Oh, yeah...borrowed that, forgot to tell you, Mom". But the kids left home years ago and it's amazing how many things aren't where I *think* I put them. I do have a certain spot for important documents. Keeping track of my car and house keys is no longer an issue, either, after fishing the key ring through a not-quite-closed car window with a wire coat hanger...three times. (Not comments, please, about being a slow learner...)

Beyond that, I claim Genealogist's Halfheimers: straddling the present *and* events several hundred years ago concurrently. Remembering what I was doing when I last handled the missing item is useless until I figure out which century I was "in". ;D


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

De, me say de, me say deja

Deja vu and I can't go home

Hey Mr. AAA Man bring slim jim banana

Deja vu and I wan' go home

De, me say de e e ja

Deja vu and I can go home

=:) Halfheimers....hee hee hee


maggs224 profile image

maggs224 6 years ago from Sunny Spain

I just love the way you write and your humorous responses to many of the comments are so witty and clever. While reading your hubs I find myself smiling and learning at the same time and I enjoy your responses to the comments almost as much as the hubs themselves.

You have some really interesting titles that I am sure that I am going to enjoy reading.

This is another excellent and well-written hub with some great insights and useful tips and well worth rating up.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hey Maggs, so glad you like the article. Smiling and learning sounds about ideal to me. Thank you for the great compliment. =:)


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 6 years ago

I love the idea of the sanctuary. The problem I have with that is, I'd need so many I'd forget what I put where.

Just had a thought. My granddaughter loves rocks, as do I, and she loves to give them to me. Instead of the little red tents, which sound cute, I could use the rocks and stones. If a coworker or my boss should stop by and say what's with the rocks? I could simply say, they fell out of my head :)

Another thumbs up!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha ha, Trish you are right, I'm always putting things in a very safe place, only trouble is it's so safe even I can't find it.

Great idea about the rocks, they not only remind you of what you were doing but they remind you of your granddaughter as well. Thanks for the visit. =:)


RedElf profile image

RedElf 6 years ago from Canada

We used to call this "a place for everything, and everything in its place" - I always thought it was a bit of a stodgy way to live (though that is how I try to stay organized) but you have shown how important it is in this updated, well-thought-out, and clearly explained version of an old adage.

My mother's version was to put certain items away for safe keeping, and then forget she even had them - like the time she found a present for someone she'd bought several years before, and forgotten about. Fortunately, the scarf was still fashionable, and made a lovely gift for someone else - perhaps she discovered a money-saving tip? :D:D:D


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

"There's a place for us, somewhere a place for us" and our stuff too. Ha ha--Hi Red, thank you for stopping by, my mother would intentionally hide a $20 bill folded up in her big wallet behind a photo or something and then when she really needed some cash she would look till she found it--maybe your mother subconsciously was doing the same thing. =:)


Shalini Kagal profile image

Shalini Kagal 6 years ago from India

At my stage in life, I'm going to need all those tips and more! Memory sanctuaries now - I might put a thought there and it could stay so safe and secure, I might never be able to find it!

Great hub, thanks!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha ha Shalini, they call that memory sanctuary the subconscious, we, however, need a sanctuary that is so blatant we can't submerge it--even if we wanted to. I hope your sanctuary is filled with fond memories. =:)


Sa`ge profile image

Sa`ge 6 years ago from Barefoot Island

My saying is, now where was I last, then i always retrace my steps. LOL


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hi Sa'ge, that works sometimes and it is even more effective if you ask "Where did my hands take on a different task from holding the thing?" It isn't always in the last place we were but in the last place that we had to pick up something or use our hands for another operation. Thank you so much for stopping by. =:)


James McV Sailor profile image

James McV Sailor 6 years ago from Northern California

Winsome ... well written and enjoyable, but I am afraid that if I spent all the time you recommend "organizing" my thoughts and piles of work the other 50% of my time left after looking for things would be used and I'd never get anything done ????


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha ha James, yes you are probably right. Then just do this--use the "Where did my hands take on a different task?" test and just get two baskets-one big and one small like they have at the airport security. Put your keys, phone etc in the little one and anything else important in the big one. You won't lose anything ever again and your possessions just got simplified--unless you buy a really big basket. =:)

Thank you for your kind words and for sailing by.


lettucehead profile image

lettucehead 6 years ago from California

Hello Winsome,

This hub reminded me of all the times I thought I lost my keys and spent hours looking for them, when they were laughing at me in my locked car :|


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha ha I love that image..."We got her again, she falls for it every time...heh heh heh" I hope you have disciplined them appropriately. =:)

A pleasure to have you stop by.


Ana Louis profile image

Ana Louis 6 years ago from Louisiana

Great hub and I really like your style of writing. I really think we have more problems remembering where we have put things today because life is so busy, cluttered, and unorganized. Life is fast paced and time is so short...we are always in a hurry, trying to juggle a hundred things at once - no wonder we can't remember where we put our keys...and sometimes our kids. lol I have a trick though. Create habits. Some examples: Always park your car in the same area or isle if possible. Always put you keys in your purse as soon as you take them out of the ignition, always put mail in a particular slot, box, or whatever until you can deal with it. Always post things you need to remember where it will be see every time you walk into a room, like the refrigerator door. You should see mine. I love post-it notes. Repetition creates habits and before you know it you will not have to concentrate on where you put something, you will automatically go to its designated location.

Not a complete cure, but helps me. Here is a truth for all you young wipper snappers - the memory is not like fine wine...it does not improve with age.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Oh shucks, and I thought all I had to do is live a few more years and it would be like a steel trap--problem is the trap is sprung and the wild game has flown along with my memory. Thanks for the repetition tips. I try to do that and then someone moves something or puts something on top of it and you wander around your familiar spots looking like you just dropped off the turnip truck. Appreciate your kind words and visit. =:)


RunAbstract profile image

RunAbstract 6 years ago from USA

I know I had something really great to say.... Oh yeah! Loved this article!


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 6 years ago from Central United States of America

'Designated places' and 'palest ink': They just fit the bill and you said it all perfectly! Thanks for a fun and useful read!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

You are so welcome FF, thank you for visiting and for the nice comment. I wonder sometimes why we spend so much time putting things to remember in our brains when it's like those children's wooden toy cylinders--you hammer one in the top and one falls out the end. =:)


Jillian Barclay profile image

Jillian Barclay 5 years ago from California, USA

Dear Winsome,

So glad you introduced yourself to me! I read this Hub first, and it is wonderful! For years, I have considered keys to be the creation of the devil! I am convinced that they move, by their own power, from place to place, always hiding at the most inopportune times!

I am going to try some of your tips, as keys are not my only nemesis.

I will be reading more of your hubs! Humor and good advice at the same time? The perfect combination!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 5 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Jillian not only can you cook but you can make a guy feel great. They say that the way to a man's heart is through his stomach, but it doesn't hurt to send a few nice words through his ears. Thank you for coming by and for the kind words. =:)


d.william profile image

d.william 5 years ago from Somewhere in the south

Love this hub. I just may try some of your suggestions. God knows that swearing at myself and calling myself stupid has not worked so far. I especially liked the analogy of the palest ink being mightier than the strongest memory. Good hub.


SportsAgencyblog profile image

SportsAgencyblog 5 years ago from Los Angeles, California

Great hub.I really like the thought.The humor makes it interesting and the sense makes it real. Surely, your not only a good writer, you're also an excellent speaker. I will take some time to read more of your hubs.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 5 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

What a great comment. Thank you SAB for visiting and for the read. Welcome to HP. =:)


annie 5 years ago

While these are excellent idea. I have tried all the above techniques; as other people must have done who live with these chronic bad habits. I get called organised because of it and although it has helped with knowing exactly where to find things I still have this problem with keys, cash card, purse and finer details of life that are important & even vital. My problem is that bad that even though I have degrees & diplomas I completed an on line ADHD test where I scored unfortunately 98%. Now that's bizarre but does explain my 56yrs of hell.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 5 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hi Annie, thanks for the comment. Maybe ADHD stands for "Always Desperately Hunting Down" things. Just kidding, that must make your life interesting and frustrating. Hope some of the article is newly helpful. =:)


lisadpreston profile image

lisadpreston 4 years ago from Columbus, Ohio

Great article. Your wit and humor is delightful. I have the worst memory for mundane things but can remember a conversation that took place with a stranger on the street 20 years ago. I have been told that I have a photographic memory although I can't remember where I parked the car. I could never understand this until reading your explanation. Thank you. I will try your techniques. (If I can remember to do so).


Winsome profile image

Winsome 4 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hi Lisa, I'm glad you had fun--memory just lends itself to humor because we've all experienced the frustration and laughter is all that's left. Sometimes I think all life's frustrations are like that--caught between laughter and tears. I choose laughter...and of course some tips to have the hard stuff happen less often.

I enjoy your style too and it's a hoot to learn from each other. Thanks for the visit and kind words. =:)


emilybee profile image

emilybee 4 years ago

Wow - I do this sometimes too, only because I know I'll wine later and admit I can't find something. Saying where you are putting something when you are putting it down, is very helpful, and sometimes it works for me :) Your writing is so clear, easy to read and free of any errors - love reading writing like that!


Winsome profile image

Winsome 4 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hi Emily, thank you for the gracious comment. Your typo is quite humorous--"I know I'll wine later and admit I can't find something." Nothing like a little wine to let down our inhibitions and loosen our tongue. heh heh

I think we have lots of "points of departures," not just in memory, if I could just remember what they are.... =:)


SugarBear 4 years ago

Help...two weeks ago I put an LP record in a "safe" place until my Ebay buyer paid...now I absolutely cannot find it..last time I remember seeing it is when I photographed it, but it's not with the camera..any ideas? I will he happy to send a diagram of my house...lol.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 4 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha ha I love a good mystery. Putting things in a "safe place" is an absolute guarantee it will be forgotten immediately--now if you put it in an "unsafe place," your brain would remember it. =:)

Seriously, if you look in all the possible safe places, be sure and look under everything--usually they are simply under an innocent piece of paper.

Thanks so much for the relevant comment.


pmorries profile image

pmorries 4 years ago from Golden, CO

I think that you are teaching people scientific rubbish! Everyone knows that according to Quantam Physics, your keys just phase out of reality for awhile, and when the conditions are right, they phase back into reality. lol


Winsome profile image

Winsome 4 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha ha, you're right PM, when I write an episode for Fringe, I can call these irritating side effects of parallel worlds "The Loki Principle."

Thanks for the visit and fun comment. =: )


Whitney J 4 years ago

Okay so I have been searching for my purse that I have lost. The only problem is, I don't remember losing it. I haven't been going out lately and so I have had no need to take my purse anywhere. The last place I remember having it was in my office but I have turned it upside down looking for it. It is not there, so I musthave moved it. But I don't remember because that same day I had my purse in the office I got some rather horrible news and that's the only thing in my memory after that. I don't remember where I placed my purse. Will you maybe give me a tip that could spark my memory of misplacing my purse?


Winsome profile image

Winsome 4 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Hi Whitney, I love a good mystery, especially if it isn't my stuff that has gone missing.

First of all, make a list of all the usual suspects of where you stow or lay down your purse in the house. Check those and look under every paper or clothes near them.

Second, remember the reason you had the purse in the office. Was there an item in it you needed and if so, look in the place where you used that item.

Third, remember where you were when you got the bad news and where you went right after that. Check both places.

Lastly, make a list of all the places you go to after you dig into your purse. For example, if you get a hair brush, look around every mirror in the house.

Another, less deductive method is to ask your higher power for assistance and then lie down or sit in a comfortable chair and let the images of you interacting with your purse trickle in. You'd be surprised how often a search right after this results in the item being found--even if you got no clear image.

I hope this helped. Thank you for visiting and may you always remember the things that are worthy and last and forget the things that are better off forgotten. =: )


Doctor Kristy profile image

Doctor Kristy 3 years ago from Australia

I can't believe I hadn't read this hub before today, it's brilliant (and entertaining, as usual). There's some great advice in this article. I should write it down. Now, where did I put my notebook...

Going out and purchasing a replacement of whatever it is I've lost is the surest way for me to find what it is I'm looking for... the original will show up in the next 24 hours, guaranteed.


Winsome profile image

Winsome 3 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas Author

Ha ha, Kristy that is a sure-fire method we don't like to use. Or you could just be proactive and buy two of everything I really need. (He writes, looking at his five guitars and seven bicycles) Thank you for coming by, I always enjoy your delightful comments. =: )


tirelesstraveler profile image

tirelesstraveler 21 months ago from California

Charming and entertaining Hub. I love the idea of the red tents for memory markers. .... Now as soon as I remember the password I will recharge my Starbucks card.

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