You Are Here: And It's An Amazing Place

The Milky Way Galaxy

Using imagery from modern telescopes, NASA has produced this incredibly detailed image of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. I've marked the approximate location of our solar system.
Using imagery from modern telescopes, NASA has produced this incredibly detailed image of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. I've marked the approximate location of our solar system. | Source

Above and Below You

You do it every day: step outside. Have you ever thought about what's below you? What's above you?

It's not exactly the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, but those are passable metaphors for the mind-boggling wonders right above us and below us. It's a little thrilling, and a little scary, to realize just where we're standing.

What's Up?

First of all, look up. That blue sky you see is our planet's atmosphere diffusing the light of the sun during the daytime. (At night, the air causes stars to shimmer).

The only thing between you and the vacuum of outer space is air: not quite emptiness, as we now know, but it's just a thin layer of gases hugging the planet like water vapor over a cold drink. There's no roof. Nothing holding it in but gravity. There's air, and then less air, and then...truly empty space, trillions upon trillions of miles of cold, deadly void, about -400° F.

At three miles up, breathing becomes difficult. Think about a three mile walk: that's not a very great distance! At five miles up, there's not enough oxygen to survive. The last wispy molecules of atmosphere are drifting off into space around 6000 miles from the surface.

Looking Down From Above (ISS, 240-200 Miles Up)

To Infinity and Beyond

That precious, flimsy envelope of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, oxygen and other gases is a tissue-thin halo around our planet. (Earth is about 7,900 miles in diameter). Yet that blanket of air burns up most of the meteorites headed our way, protects us from solar and intersteller radiation, keeps us warm, and makes life possible.

Beyond Earth's atmophere, we quickly soar off into unimaginable distances. It's 93 million miles to the Sun. Even from within our own solar system — in Saturn's neighborhood — planet Earth looks like a dot. Our solar system in turn is just a grain of sand in the Milky Way Galaxy, a glittering island of stars 100,000 light years across (one light year is about 6 trillion miles) in the cosmic ocean. There are billions of galaxies out there in deep space, separated by distances that make our galaxy itself look like a gnat on the brow of God.

Look up. Be awed by that gentle breath of wind brushing against your face, separating you from nearly infinite empty space.

Earth, the "Pale Blue Dot"

Astronomer Carl Sagan famously dubbed our planet the "pale blue dot" from a photo taken by the early Voyager probe to Saturn. Here, Cassini's hi-res camera snaps a better photo of Earth from backlit Saturn in 2011.
Astronomer Carl Sagan famously dubbed our planet the "pale blue dot" from a photo taken by the early Voyager probe to Saturn. Here, Cassini's hi-res camera snaps a better photo of Earth from backlit Saturn in 2011. | Source

I Feel the Earth Move Under My Feet

Well, not right now, but I live in a part of the world where I was asked, "Did you feel that earthquake yesterday?" as recently as last Thursday (Answer: no, it was only a 4, and I was driving). I have the current earthquakes page on Caltech bookmarked on my browser the way people in other parts of the country bookmark the local weather forecast.

Moving to California has made me even more keenly aware of plate tectonics, the movement of the earth's thin crust over its molten interior.

How thick is that crust of rock under our feet? Compared to the size of the Earth itself, it's only a skin:

Thickness of the Earth's Crust in Kilometers

Map showing the thickness of the crust (not elevation). A kilometer is 0.62 miles.
Map showing the thickness of the crust (not elevation). A kilometer is 0.62 miles. | Source

Walking on Eggshells

The Earth's land masses are mostly 20 to 30 miles thick. Your morning commute may be farther! Below that is the mantle, a zone of "ultramafic" rock under such crushing pressure that it can't even melt, despite being heated to thousands of degrees. Instead, it flows like clay. Also, the rare mantle rocks that have been squeezed up from below are green!

It's hard to comprehend that we're standing on a very thin rocky crust with thousands of miles of incredibly dense, unbelievably hot, green rock that oozes and flows underfoot.

Rocks From Earth's Mantle: Green?!

Source

Liquid Diamonds at Earth's Core


In some places, the Earth's crust is even thinner. The ocean floor is only 3 to 5 miles thick, and there are rift zones like Death Valley that are stretched out like taffy to a few miles' thickness. That's not much solid rock between us and an inferno!

It gets even wilder as you go down. 1800 miles below our feet is a liquid outer core of molten metal, spinning and sloshing around like a Mars-sized electromagnet to create our planet's magnetic field. Inside that, there's a superheated solid inner core of the Earth compressed so tightly that it's become a solid crystal, like a metallic diamond. [Learn how scientists map the Earth's innards]. It's heated to over 10,000° F, it's radioactive, and it may have been there since the Earth first coalesced.

This is deep stuff. And hot stuff. Earth's core is as hot as the surface of the sun. It's below us all the time while we go about our daily lives. Dante's Inferno is a tempest in a teapot compared to the Earth's interior.

The Earth's Interior

Source

Look Up. Look Down. Back to You.

That's where we live on this thin skin of Earth, under a thin sliver of sky, between cold infinity and a molten inferno.

Step outside. Look up. Look down. Be amazed.

Or, to quote Shakespeare,

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

Hamlet

What's Above Our Heads: Hubble Looks Out

More by this Author


Comments 9 comments

lisa42 profile image

lisa42 4 years ago from Sacramento

Ellen, you have a great gift to be able to explain such complex things in such simple and readable language. I love reading your writing. When I think about how vast the universe is and how small we are, it blows my mind. I get so caught up in the concept that I can't even think about it. But you make it almost fun to contemplate our insignificance in the vastness of space. (P.S. I love the Cassini photo. Perfect image for this hub!)


pennyofheaven profile image

pennyofheaven 4 years ago from New Zealand

Your words took me on a journey of adventure filled with excitement and awe. I agree with lisa42. You do have a great gift indeed!


Greekgeek profile image

Greekgeek 4 years ago from California Author

Thank you both! That's great to hear, since it's what I really want to accomplish: whatever subject's got me fascinated, I want to share the fascination, not just the facts.


Flynn the Cat profile image

Flynn the Cat 4 years ago from Auckland, New Zealand

I just like you should have snuck "I'm on a horse" in there somewhere :D


Greekgeek profile image

Greekgeek 4 years ago from California Author

I was just getting to that when the ink ran out...

(Of course, the entire hub is much improved by imagining it was narrated by Isaiah Mustafa in a towel.)


Flynn the Cat profile image

Flynn the Cat 4 years ago from Auckland, New Zealand

Argh. 'think' not 'like'.

But yes. I was hearing it in his voice from "look up".


stereo-lab profile image

stereo-lab 3 years ago from Alberta

Great representation of just how insignificant we are.


Elsie Hagley profile image

Elsie Hagley 21 months ago from New Zealand

Yes the world is an amazing place and I do appreciate it, just as you are an amazing writer. This article is written so well that anyone reading it will learn a lot like I just did.

It certainly makes the world a whole different place to me.

Happy New Year to you.


Cynthia Haltom profile image

Cynthia Haltom 13 months ago from Diamondhead

Love to read new information on the planets. I can't wait to see our next finding from space.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working