Edgar Allan Poe - on the Screen

Pit and the Pendulum (1961) poster
Pit and the Pendulum (1961) poster
Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe

One of the immortals of literature, Edgar Allan Poe was born in 1809 in Boston, Massachusetts. He was one of the most widely read authors of the 19th century. Poe was famous for his tales of mystery, macabre stories, crime fiction, and many poems.

The poem The Raven was so popular it instantly made Poe a household name across America, he was paid just $9 for it's publication in 1845. His popularity spread to Europe, he was celebrated in France and England.

He wrote detective fiction which would be a great influence on future authors like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle the creator of Sherlock Holmes. He was also famous as a literary critic.

His death in 1849 could have come straight out of one of his mystery stories, he was found shaking, delirious and in great distress on the streets of Baltimore, the clothes he wore were not his own, taken to hospital he died a few days later, his last words were "Oh Lord help my poor soul". A newspaper report noted he died of "cerebral inflammation". His death certificate has since been lost.

His stories have been the subject of over 200 movies since the silent movie era, here are a few of the most noteworthy films.

The Fall of the House of Usher (1928)
The Fall of the House of Usher (1928)
Fall of the House of Usher (1928)
Fall of the House of Usher (1928)


A French silent released in 1928, The Fall of the House of Usher was directed by Jean Epstein and starred Jean Debucourt as Sir Roderick Usher.

"I barely stirred during the film's 66-minute running time. A tone, an atmosphere, was created that actually worked. As with "Nosferatu," the film seemed less a fiction than the realization of some phantasmagoric alternative reality. " (Roger Ebert)

IMDB rating 7.3

Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932)
Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932)
Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932) poster
Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932) poster


Bela Lugosi as Dr. Mirakle in Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932) directed by Robert Florey and also starring Sidney Fox and Leon Ames as Dupin..61mins.

Poe's Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841) is credited as the first ever detective story and his fictional detecive Auguste Dupin (Pierre Dupin in the movie) would reappear in other Poe mystery stories.

IMDB rating 6.3

The Black Cat (1934)
The Black Cat (1934)
The Black Cat (1934) poster
The Black Cat (1934) poster

Boris Karloff vs Bela Lugosi! Who will win? The Black Cat (1934) directed by Edgar G. Ulmer and also starring David Manners and Julie Bishop. 65mins.

Despite Poe's name on the credits it had nothing to do with his short story though a black cat does appear in one scene only to be killed by Lugosi who has a morbid fear of cats.

One of the best horror films of the 30's the film concerns Lugosi as Dr. Vitus Werdergast planning revenge on evil satanist Hjalmar Poelzig (Karloff) who has kidnapped his wife.

David Manners: "Sounds like a lot of supernatural baloney to me."
Bela Lugosi: "Supernatural, perhaps; baloney, perhaps not."

IMDB rating 7.2

The Raven (1935) poster
The Raven (1935) poster
The Raven (1935)
The Raven (1935)

Boris and Bela at each others throats again! The Raven (1935) directed by Lew Landers and also starring Lester Matthews and Irene Ware. 61mins.

Based very loosely on Poe's poem, well they share the same title. Lugosi plays a mad doctor obsessed with Poe and collects torture devices depicted in Poe's stories. Karloff plays an escaped criminal who begs Lugosi for a new face, Lugosi agrees but only after Karloff helps him on some mad revenge scheme, Karloff is than rewarded with a hideously deformed 'new' face.

Lugosi: Poe, you are avenged!

IMDB rating 7.0

The Black Cat (1941)
The Black Cat (1941)


The Black Cat (1941) directed by Albert S. Rogell and starring Basil Rathbone, Broderick Crawford, Gale Sondergaard, Bela Lugosi, Hugh Herbert, Gladys Cooper and Alan Ladd. 70mins.

'Inspired' by Poe's short story, the murder mystery is closer in tone to The Cat and the Canary. Worth watching for the all star cast.

At one point Broderick Crawford's character says (regarding Rathbone) "He thinks he's Sherlock Holmes!"

IMDB rating 6.2.


The Mystery of Marie Roget (1942) poster
The Mystery of Marie Roget (1942) poster



The Mystery of Marie Roget (1942) directed by Phil Rosen and starring Patric Knowles, Maria Montez and Maria Ouspenskaya. 61mins.

Based on Poe's sequel to Murders in the Rue Morgue, first published in 1842 and featuring his detective Dupin (Knowles) investigating the mysterious death of a young actress. The story was the first ever murder mystery based on a real crime.

IMDB rating 5.9

The Tell-Tale Heart (1953)
The Tell-Tale Heart (1953)
The Tell-Tale Heart (1953)
The Tell-Tale Heart (1953)


The Tell-Tale Heart (1953) directed by Ted Parmelee. An animated short based on Poe's short story and narrated by James Mason. 8mins.

The first cartoon to be given an X rating by the British censor.

Oscar nominated for Best Short Subject, Animated

IMDB rating 7.7.

Phantom of the Rue Morgue (1954)
Phantom of the Rue Morgue (1954)
Phantom of the Rue Morgue (1954)
Phantom of the Rue Morgue (1954)


Phantom of the Rue Morgue (1954) directed by Roy Del Ruth and starring Karl Malden, Claude Dauphin, Patricia Medina and Steve Forrest as Dupin.83mins.

Another version of Poe's Murders in the Rue Morgue, this time in colour and 3D.

The guy playing Sultan the gorilla, Charles Gemora, played Erik the gorilla in the 1932 version. Gemora has played gorilla's in more than 20 movies, he played a Martian in War of the Worlds (1953).

IMDB rating 5.6


House of Usher (1960)
House of Usher (1960)
House of Usher (1960) UK poster
House of Usher (1960) UK poster
House of Usher (1960)
House of Usher (1960)

Vincent Price as Roderick Usher in House of Usher (1960) directed by Roger Corman and also starring Mark Damon, Myrna Fahey and Harry Ellerbe. 79mins.

Retitled The Fall of the House of Usher in the UK, perhaps the most famous of all Poe movie adaptations, it's success kickstarted a whole series of Poe inspired films by Roger Corman in the 60's.

Shot in just 15 days, Corman gave the film a stylish and classy look and the use of widescreen made it look more impressive. Vincent Price was excellent as mad Roderick Usher.

Roderick Usher: Did you know that I could hear the scratching of her fingernails on the casket lid?

Chosen for preservation by the National Film Registry in 2005.

IMDB rating 7.0

Pit and the Pendulum (1961)
Pit and the Pendulum (1961)
Pit and the Pendulum (1961)
Pit and the Pendulum (1961)
Pit and the Pendulum (1961) poster
Pit and the Pendulum (1961) poster

"You are about to enter Hell, Bartolome - Hell!...The nether world, the infernal region, the abode of the damned...The place of torment. Pandemonium, Abbadon, Tophet, Gehenna, Narraka...the Pit ...and the Pendulum."

Pit and the Pendulum (1961) directed by Roger Corman and starring Vincent Price, John Kerr, Luana Anders and Barbara Steele. 80mins.

Only the memorable finale had any resemblance to Poe's story. it was a wooden pendulum and the blade was made of rubber, actor John Kerr was still nervous being strapped under it.

IMDB rating 7.0.

Premature Burial (1962)
Premature Burial (1962)
Premature Burial (1962) poster
Premature Burial (1962) poster



The Premature Burial (1962) directed by Roger Corman and starring Ray Milland, Hazel Court, Richard Ney, Heather Angel and Alan Napier. 81mins.

The only connection with Poe's short story is Ray Milland's obsessive phobia about being buried alive.

The theme of being buried or walled-up alive runs through many of Poe's stories

Tagline - Within the Coffin I lie... ALIVE!

IMDB rating 6.5

Tales of Terror (1962) poster
Tales of Terror (1962) poster
Tales of Terror (1962)
Tales of Terror (1962)

Tales of Terror (1962) starring Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Basil Rathbone. Maggie Pierce, Joyce Jameson and Debra Paget. 89mins.

A trio of stories based on Poe's "Morella", "The Black Cat" and "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar"

Les Baxter's music and Floyd Crosby's cinematography were an important part of the success of Roger Corman's Poe series.

The film took longer than usual for Corman to shoot, 21 days.

IMDB rating 6.7

The Raven (1963) poster
The Raven (1963) poster
The Raven (1963)
The Raven (1963)

Vincent Price as Erasmus Craven, Peter Lorre as Adolphus Bedlo and Boris Karloff as Scarabus in The Raven (1963) directed by Roger Corman. also starring Hazel Court, Olive Sturgess and Jack Nicholson. 86mins.

The most popular of Roger Corman's series of Poe films with the three horror legends clearly enjoying playing rival sorcerers, and young Jack Nicholson plays Peter Lorre's son.

Vincent Price recites Poe's classic poem ending the film with the words "Quoth the raven, "Nevermore!"

IMDB rating 6.7

The Raven (1963)
The Raven (1963)


Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
"'Tis some visitor," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door
Only this, and nothing more."

(The first stanza from Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven".)

The Haunted Palace (1963) poster
The Haunted Palace (1963) poster

The Haunted Palace (1963) directed by Roger Corman and starring Vincent Price, Debra Paget, Lon Chaney Jr and Elisha Cook Jr. 87mins.

Despite Poe's name above the title The Haunted Palace was in fact based on H.P. Lovecraft's novel The Case of Charles Dexter Ward (1927).

IMDB rating 6.6

Masque of the Red Death (1964)
Masque of the Red Death (1964)
Masque of the Red Death (1964)
Masque of the Red Death (1964)
Masque of the Red Death (1964) poster
Masque of the Red Death (1964) poster


The Masque of the Red Death (1964) directed by Roger Corman and starring Vincent Price, Hazel Court, Jane Asher, David Weston, Nigel Green and Patrick Magee. 89mins.

Generally regarded as the best of the Roger Corman Poe films

Corman filmed Masque in England on sets left over from the film Becket. The Red Death is fictional and was invented by Poe for his story. The Black Death wiped out most of Europe in the 14th century, 100 million people died of the plague.

IMDB rating 7.0

The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)
The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)
The Tomb of Ligeia (1964) poster
The Tomb of Ligeia (1964) poster


The Tomb of Ligeia (1964) directed by Roger Corman and starring Vincent Price, Elizabeth Shepherd, John Westbrook and Derek Francis. 81mins.

Based on the short story "Ligeia" first published in 1838 and the last of the Roger Corman Poe series. Filmed at Shepperton studios, England.

IMDB rating 6.6

War-Gods of the Deep (1965) poster
War-Gods of the Deep (1965) poster

War-Gods of the Deep (1965) directed by Jacques Tourneur and starring Vincent Price, David Tomlinson, Tab Hunter and Susan Hart. 84mins.

A fantasy adventure based very loosely on Poe's poem "The City in the Sea" (1845). A lost city is discovered beneath the sea off the coast of Cornwall.

UK title The City Under the Sea.

IMDB rating 5.2

The Torture Chamber of Dr. Sadism (1967)
The Torture Chamber of Dr. Sadism (1967)
The Torture Chamber of Dr. Sadism (1967) poster
The Torture Chamber of Dr. Sadism (1967) poster


The Torture Chamber of Dr. Sadism (1967) directed by Harald Reinl and starring Lex Barker, Karin Dor and Christopher Lee. 85mins.

A German film based loosely on Poe's The Pit and the Pendulum, well it does have a pit and pendulum at the climax. The film has a creepy atmosphere in the style of Mario Bava, a memorable sequence features a ride through a haunted forest at night with corpses hanging off the trees.

Christopher Lee plays the evil Count Regula there is no Dr. Sadism despite the title. Also known as The Blood Demon.

IMDB rating 6.0

Torture Garden (1967)
Torture Garden (1967)
Torture Garden (1967) poster
Torture Garden (1967) poster


Torture Garden (1967) directed by Freddie Francis and starring Jack Palance, Burgess Meredith, Peter Cushing, Beverly Adams and Maurice Denham. 93mins.

A horror omnibus featuring four stories by 'Psycho' author Robert Bloch. The last story "The Man Who Collected Poe" features Jack Palance as the worlds greatest collector of Poe memorabilia who discovers to his astonishment that Peter Cushing has the ultimate Poe collectible, locked up in his cellar and still writing stories!

IMDB rating 6.1

The Oblong Box (1969)
The Oblong Box (1969)


The Oblong Box (1969) directed by Gordon Hessler and starring Vincent Price, Christopher Lee, Rupert Davies and Sally Geeson. 91mins.

Apart from the title it shares little in common with Poe's short story of 1844.

Filming started with director Michael Reeves at the helm, he had directed Witchfinder General starring Vincent Price, a year before. But he died of an accidental barbiturate overdose, aged just 25 and the film was completed by Hessler.

IMDB rating 5.9

Murders in the Rue Morgue (1971)
Murders in the Rue Morgue (1971)
Murders in the Rue Morgue (1971) poster
Murders in the Rue Morgue (1971) poster



Murders in the Rue Morgue (1971) directed by Gordon Hessler and starring Jason Robards, Herbert Lom, Christine Kaufmann and Adolfo Celi. 87mins (98mins)

Another adaptation of the Poe story, this one has some new twists and turns with the plot resembling The Phantom of the Opera, a role Herbert Lom has already played in a Hammer horror movie.

Poe's detective 'Auguste Dupin' is missing from this version.

IMDB rating 5.2.



Murders in the Rue Morgue (1986)
Murders in the Rue Morgue (1986)



The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1986) directed by Jeannot Szwarc and starring George C. Scott, Rebecca De Mornay, Ian McShane, Neil Dickson and Val Kilmer. 100mins.

And yet another version of Poe's golden oldie, this version made for TV and boasting the great George C. Scott as Auguste Dupin.

IMDB rating 5.7

Two Evil Eyes (1990) poster
Two Evil Eyes (1990) poster


Two Evil Eyes (1990) directed by Dario Argento and George Romero and starring Harvey Keitel, Adrienne Barbeau, E.G. Marshall and Martin Balsam. 120mins.

A double bill of gory horror from two masters of the genre, based on the Poe stories "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar" and "The Black Cat".

At 9 million dollars it was the most expensive Poe film to date. It's total gross in the U.S. was $350,000.

IMDB rating 5.9

The Pit and the Pendulum (1991) poster
The Pit and the Pendulum (1991) poster



The Pit and the Pendulum (1991) directed by Stuart Gordon and starring Lance Henriksen as the Grand Inquisitor Torquemada, also starring Stephen Lee, Jeffrey Combs and Oliver Reed. 97mins.

A cult gory horror with plenty of nudity and an array of torture devices including, you guessed it, a pendulum and a pit.

Director Gordon wanted Peter O'Toole to play Torquemada but things didn't work out.

IMDB rating 6.1

The Raven (2012)
The Raven (2012)

The Raven (2012) directed by James McTeigue and starring John Cusack, Luke Evans, Alice Eve and Brendan Gleeson. 111mins.

John Cusack plays Edgar Allan Poe, he teams up with a young Baltimore detective (Luke Evans) to catch a serial killer responsible for a series of gruesome murders.

Ewan McGregor and Jeremy Renner were originally meant to star but they both dropped out.

James McTeigue has also directed V for Vendetta (2005).

The Raven (2012) poster
The Raven (2012) poster
The Raven (1963) poster
The Raven (1963) poster

Highest Rated Edgar Allan Poe Films

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24 comments

vmartinezwilson profile image

vmartinezwilson 4 years ago from Vancouver, WA

Loved seeing this! My daughter is named Raven after the poem, so I can't wait to see this variation of the movie. I also liked the Masque of the Red Death and thought the film adaptation was rather nice when I saw it years ago!

Great job! Awesome and voted up!

PS, sadly some of your pictures aren't showing.


Steve Lensman profile image

Steve Lensman 4 years ago from London, England Author

Thanks Vanessa, appreciate you popping in to my Poe hub.

Your daughter named Raven, that's great, has she got black hair? ;)

The pictures are there, I cleared my cache and refreshed and they all came up. Its because there are so many and sometimes browsers skip a few, fast internet speed helps too.


vmartinezwilson profile image

vmartinezwilson 4 years ago from Vancouver, WA

Steve, they showed up for me this time, which is wonderful, since I really wanted to see all of the different posters. I love the early era posters, they're so artistic and gothic looking.

Nope, my daughter is a blonde, lol. I have to explain to many people the reasoning behind her name. If my husband had his way, her name would have been Lenore. We do love Poe.


Steve Lensman profile image

Steve Lensman 4 years ago from London, England Author

"For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore"

Lenore's a great name, but Raven has that punkish quality. ;)

Thanks for posting.


Davesworld profile image

Davesworld 4 years ago from Cottage Grove, MN 55016

Every once in a while, the Friday night movies departed from their usual fare of Roy Rogers and Gene Autry to give us a Vincent Price horror movie. I watched several of those on Friday night as a kid. Thanks for the trip down memory lane.


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 4 years ago

Will enjoy going through this in detail later this weekend. Now Amy is in front of my computer screen. Mummy Turn the computer off!


Cogerson profile image

Cogerson 4 years ago from Virginia

Very nicely done....thanks for the new trailer for The Raven with John Cusack....it was actually the first time I have seen the trailer...it looks pretty good to me. I think Cusack is a good match for Poe.

Wow I had no idea that there were so many Poe movies out there and even more amazing to me is the fact that so many of his stories have been filmed so many different....I lost count on how many different The Ravens and Murders in the Rue Morgue have been filmed.

One of the benefits of living on the East Coast...I am only about an hour away from the Edgar Allan Poe musuem in Richmond Virginia and only hours away from his house in Baltimore Maryland.

I have read many of his books but for some reason I have only seen a few of the movies in your hub....but I love The Black Cat(one of my favorite Karloff movies) and The Raven(Nicholson version). Awesome photos, awesome posters and an eye opening hub...I need to watch more Poe movies....voted up and interesting.


prairieprincess profile image

prairieprincess 4 years ago from Canada

This is great! I had no idea that Edgar Allan Poe's works had been made into so many movies. I loved the short story, The TellTale Heart," which we read in my high school English class. Voted up, awesome and beautiful!


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 4 years ago

Hope you are having a great birthday, Bruce. I didn't expect you to be online at all today.

Steve:

For this comment, I'll just list what movies I have seen that you have included, in the order they appear and then a comment on what films I'm looking forward to seeing:

The Black Cat 1934

House of Usher 1960

Pit and the Pendulum 1961

The Raven 1963

As you can see, a preference for a particular actor, although there are certain of his Poe films I've still not seen. I would like to see the early films pre:1940 that I haven't seen as I think they rely more on the imagination that real gore. I've never had any interest in watching any version of The Masque of the Red Death.


Steve Lensman profile image

Steve Lensman 4 years ago from London, England Author

Davesworld, Flora, Cogerson, prairieprincess and Flora, thanks all for posting and commenting, it is very much appreciated!

Davesworld, glad you enjoyed it!

Flora, say hi to Amy for me.

Bruce, I was planning to write a bio of Poe to add to my author hubs and decided there were enough Poe bios on the web already and compiled a trip thru the Poe movies instead. I was also curious to know how many I had seen. I will do that Poe bio one day, since I've done one on H.P. Lovecraft but there's no rush. Oh and Happy Birthday!! :)

prairieprincess, thank you for the kind words and votes.

Flora, Masque of the Red Death is one of the best Poe adaptations and Price is very good in it. It isn't that gory and you can always turn your head away at the nasty bits. I'd watch any movie with Price starring, especially in the horror genre.

Actually I'm watching Price right now while typing this, I've got Pit and the Pendulum playing. :)


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 4 years ago

Well, then, I'll watch it the next time it is on TCM. I won't go looking for it, though. I will say Hi to Amy. :)


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 4 years ago

Poe was also a *character* -himself prior to his fame - portrayed by Joseph Cotten in the 1951 movie The Man With A Cloak. It was Leslie Caron's second film ever. Thje star was Barbara Stanwyck. I enjoy it a lot better than the score it gets.

Thoughts on the portraits and posters:

I love the portrait shown early in the hub.

The James Mason image in The Tell tale Heart poster looks like it is from another movie and put on a background of spirals. An X rating? I thought that was Felix the cat, but maybe he is American, not British.

lots of black cats in the posters. I love cats, but whenever the cat is black in the film, I know the causes are unkind, shall we say?

My favourite poster is House of Usher with the full title of Fall of the House of Usher with Price et al.


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 4 years ago

odd. I sent you some fan mail and as a result I was moved to the end of your followers list as if I were brand new follower...


Jools99 profile image

Jools99 4 years ago from North-East UK

Steve, great photos and dialogue. Some of these are close to my heart because my sister and I used to watch a lot of them on Friday night on BBC2 (horror films). We both loved anything with Vincent Price in it and I used to really like Boris Karloff.

Poe's death sounds like something from one of his own stories, poor guy, so young too. He certainly knew how to get inside the human mind and scare us all.


The Writers Dog 4 years ago

I am glad that I did not find this great Hub on a midnight drab and dreary! Poe's 'The Raven' is my favourite poem. I had no idea there had been so many films made of it!

Voted up, evermore!


Steve Lensman profile image

Steve Lensman 4 years ago from London, England Author

Flora, Jools, The Writers Dog, thanks for Poesting, it is most appreciated.

Flora, thanks I received your fan mail, and thanks for being a brand new follower. ;)

I looked up that film you mentioned 'Man with a Cloak' at IMDB and Poe's name doesn't come up anywhere not even in the comments. That's why I didn't see it in my research. What made you think Cotten was playing Poe?

I had a black cat once a long time ago, he didn't bring me bad luck or any luck, he was a good cat though, miss him.

Jools, hi there, I used to watch those horror films on BBC 2 too. They would have horror double bills I think on saturday night as well, like The Raven and Tales of Terror one after the other, good stuff. Remember Moviedrome? Alex Cox would introduce some rare cult movies and talk about them before they started. I loved that sort of thing.

The Writers Dog, thanks for the vote. I'm not into poetry but The Raven is my favourite too and the one I've known since childhood.

Thanks all for posting.


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 4 years ago

Throughout the movie, he talks about how no one buys his writing. At the end of the film, we see the bartender refuse Cotten's IOU and through it away. The piece of paper turns over on the ground and we see his handwritten poem-Anabel Lee. Like the characters who have never been given a name - he isn't. It is only at the end of the film you realize who he is. You aren't meant to know until the end of the movie. Like the "?" in credits.


Steve Lensman profile image

Steve Lensman 4 years ago from London, England Author

Sounds like an interesting film Flora. I'll keep an eye out for it on the TV channels. Thanks for the info.


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 4 years ago

Just so any of your readers know, Cotten's character's identity does not in any way affect the identity of the criminal or how the crime is solved, so I am not ruining the film by revealing his identity. There has been a wonderful hub by Hyphenbird which points out that often in hubs about books or movies, people have mentioned spoilers in the comments, thinking everyone has read or seen it, and yet this is not so. Especially since comments made on hubs you are following will show up on your home page feed, if someone comments about "I knew from the start that so and so was guilty" and you haven't read the book, well, there is the ending. I learned the ending of many a mystery thriller movie because of Remmington Steele quoting movie plots all the time, that some twist endings of very famous films were known to me before I saw them for the first time. But that was my choice as Brosnan's fan to watch the show. It's completely different to not warn people that spoilers will be discussed and then reveal the guilty party. I've noticed that some hub authors are very careful to mention at the beginning of their articles that spoilers will be discussed so not read them if you want to be surprised. Steven and Greensleeves both warn people and that is what you should do.


Steve Lensman profile image

Steve Lensman 4 years ago from London, England Author

Hi Flora, I do sometimes reveal the endings on really popular and famous films because most people would have seen it already, the few that haven't should be reading Maltin's mini-review not a lengthy tribute to the film.

Planet of the Apes for instance, my hub is a celebration of the film and it would seem half finished if I never mention or discuss the famous twist ending.

I can't remember but I think on my Soylent Green hub I did decide to hold back on revealing the shock ending.

Sometimes finding out how a film ends makes me really interested in seeing it. For instance the Nic Cage film 'Knowing', I was going to ignore it until I saw a spoiler about the completely unexpected surprise ending and than I just had to see it.

Your post revealing the ending of The Man with a Cloak makes the film more interesting for me. If you hadn't mentioned it I would most likely have ignored it. :)


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 4 years ago

Thanks for your help, Steve, regarding that advice I asked you. I got that task done tonight. another thing crossed off my list of tasks to complete. :)


Steve Lensman profile image

Steve Lensman 4 years ago from London, England Author

Glad to be of some help Flora, at least you got that out of the way.

I bought the Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe from Amazon for Kindle a few days ago, only £1.90. I have an old book on Poe's horror tales but it's good to have 'everything' he wrote and at such a cheap price. The book was downloaded to my computer in seconds and than I transferred it to kindle via usb.

I also bought the complete works of Shakespeare and Dickens for kindle, same price. I still prefer reading a proper book but the kindle is a cool gadget, useful, convenient and easy on the eyes too (no backlight). Gosh I sound like a commercial. :)


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 4 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY

The "Black cat" was definitely my favorite of these, althugh it was Poe in name only. (Well, there was a cat.)

One of my favorite lines came from that film. "Even the phones are dead here". Gotta love it.

Fun hub,

Rob


Steve Lensman profile image

Steve Lensman 4 years ago from London, England Author

Hey thanks Rob, I enjoyed putting this one together. I have plenty more "pick a topic" coffee-table hubs in the pipeline. :)

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