Easy DIY How to Make a Christmas Stocking for a Pet

Remember Your Pets for Christmas

Aaaw...don't these little stockings look SO cute hanging from the mantle?
Aaaw...don't these little stockings look SO cute hanging from the mantle? | Source
My cat, Skeeter, supervises the creation of his special Christmas stocking.
My cat, Skeeter, supervises the creation of his special Christmas stocking. | Source

Beginner Sewers Can Make This

This Hub is for adults and kids.

Anyone who knows how to use a sewing machine safely to stitch forward, in reverse and around curves can make a stocking.

If you live in a home with an active sewing machine and frequent sewing projects occurring, you will most likely already have a supply of scrap fabrics, thread, fabric scissors, pins, hand needles, tape measures, and the other supplies that go with craft or garment sewing.

The stocking shown is less than nine inches long. It is meant for show, not for actual play by the pet.

Supplies and Tools

1. 4 pieces of fabric or felt about 9 by 5 inches or less

2. Newspaper or paper to make your pattern

3. Ruler or tape measure

4. All the other stuff mentioned above which sewers usually have:

Thread, fabric scissors, pins, hand needles....sewing machine.

First, Make the Pattern

I love math. Lots of people pretend that math is only formulas and calculators and memorized equations. Math is SO much more than that. Driving a car is all about the math of distances and stopping times (and more.) Sewing anything involves MAJOR MATH that you already are good at. So, if anyone asks you about your math skills– you tell them about your sewing.

Please look at my photo below and any other Christmas stocking look that you like. There is a longer leg part of a stocking and the heel-foot-toe part. Draw a stocking pattern that looks similar to this pattern.

This is not about being perfect

The stocking pattern.
The stocking pattern. | Source
Stocking pattern next to the existing 2 stockings.
Stocking pattern next to the existing 2 stockings. | Source

Pattern Making - Learn from My Mistakes

Because you need more fabric around the foot than what will actually show (technical term is the seam allowance), make a very fat foot.

The first time I made a pet stocking, I made the cut-out foot pattern realistically sized.

That was a Big mistake. After I sewed the 2 sides together and turned it right-side out – blecch – I had a weird skinny emaciated chicken foot.

If you want to follow my measurements exactly, the green board upon which the pattern lies shows squares like graph paper. Each one is a 1-inch square. Therefore, the width of the before-sewn leg ankle heel foot is 4 inches. The toe gets down to about 3 ½ inches wide but do not go any skinnier. Think “Chunky Monkey” for pattern making purposes.

Decide, Overlap, and Cut, then SEW

Since you are an experienced enough sewer, you know that to connect pieces there must be some fabric which will be sticking on the inside (seam allowance). So, when you decide how many stripes or bands of fabrics there will be – make sure each has overlap room to sew to the adjacent pieces. About ¼ inch is plenty. I have been sewing a LONG time, so I can work with a smaller amount.

Make sure you cut a front side and then flip your pattern over to do the back side.

Sew the front pieces all together using the front –to-front method. Then separately sew the back pieces together. Fold them open to make a complete side with all the seam allowances on what will be the stocking’s inside. DON’T connect front to back yet!!!

The Heart of the Process

Choose which parts of the stocking will have what fabric or felt.
Choose which parts of the stocking will have what fabric or felt. | Source
Make sure the fabric parts overlap each other in size at the connecting border.
Make sure the fabric parts overlap each other in size at the connecting border. | Source
Sew right sides together for each "strip" in the stocking.
Sew right sides together for each "strip" in the stocking. | Source
When done with one side lay it out, then...
When done with one side lay it out, then... | Source
Open up all the strips to get a complete stocking front and complete stocking back.
Open up all the strips to get a complete stocking front and complete stocking back. | Source

The Hanging Loop

If you are going to hang this stocking along the stairs or from a mantle it is very helpful to have a loop for a nail or other hanging hook device.

Over-estimate how long it must be!

Once the strip of fabric is folded in half, you will still need enough length from both halves to be sewn onto one of the stocking sides. I use a piece of scrap fabric 6 inches long by 1 inch wide. First, turn it into a thinner strip by folding the sides inward and sewing down the strip to secure those folds shut. Then I fold the strip in half to make the loop and attach to one of the stocking sides. One could also use a piece of ribbon , shoelace, or bias tape.

Making the Loop

Use a scrap of fabric about 1 x 6 inches large.
Use a scrap of fabric about 1 x 6 inches large. | Source
The loop after it has been folded and sewn.  also, a piece of thin shoelace works.
The loop after it has been folded and sewn. also, a piece of thin shoelace works. | Source
Sew the folded loop onto the edge of one of the stocking sides.
Sew the folded loop onto the edge of one of the stocking sides. | Source

Finish Attaching the Front and Back

Put the two stocking sides together front to front and pin them in a few places.

Then sew from one top corner, going down the side and around the foot. Continue up to the other corner. [Do not sew across the top. That would make it impossible to place treats in the stocking.]

Take out the pins and turn the stocking right side out. A pencil can be used to help push out any parts that are not completely turned right side out.

Final steps for making a pet's Christmas stocking

Both complete sides are sewn together - right sides together.
Both complete sides are sewn together - right sides together. | Source
A pencil can help push out some of the stubborn nooks that don't completely reverse themselves on the turning it right side out.
A pencil can help push out some of the stubborn nooks that don't completely reverse themselves on the turning it right side out. | Source

The Back Story

Last year I made cute stockings to “hang by the chimney with care” for our cats, The Goddess and her son Sammy. Since we have been blessed with a new boy cat, Skeeter, since Christmas – I am making another pet-sized stocking. He is a tiny bit smaller than Sammy and obviously larger than the Goddess, so I am making his stocking to be in-between sized.


Enjoy including your pet in the traditions of Christmas which are safe for the pet. This can include the pet stocking. However, remember, for most pets – human foods are not a good idea. Maybe Santa has some Milkbones or catnip Greenies for your pet.

All photos and text copyright 2011 Maren E. Morgan, all rights reserved.


Merry Christmas!

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Comments 2 comments

natures47friend profile image

natures47friend 4 years ago from Sunny Art Deco Napier, New Zealand.

So cool. My daughter needs to see this. She is 12. We all love cats..we have two. One we were asked to have as the owners were moving to Japan and she had a stocking of her own...love this hub idea and your great photos. The time you must have put into this hub should be rewarded. Voted up and awesome!!!!


Maren Morgan M-T profile image

Maren Morgan M-T 4 years ago from Pennsylvania Author

Thank you, natures47friend. Please let me know how your stocking making goes. Even though I tried to explain lots of basic steps, I still feel that I didn't explain enough for a new sewer. I'd appreciate your feedback.

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