Not Your Mother's Chocolate Chip Cookies: Candy Bar Cookie Recipes

Malt Ball Cookies cool on a rack.
Malt Ball Cookies cool on a rack.

Re-Imagine a Classic with Classic Candybars

A gooey, melty, fresh-from-the-oven chocolate chip cookie paired with a cold glass of milk is pretty close to perfection. The Toll House Cookie is a classic treat that has fueled many a mother-child bonding afternoon, an impromptu math lesson if you make a double batch, a sweet offering to cheer a sick friend.

Sometimes, there's no substitute for the original classic chocolate chip cookie recipe. Other times, there sure is. A favorite trick of mine is to sass up your basic chocolate chip cookie with candy bits. Ben and Jerry did it for ice cream, changing the freezer aisle along the way. You can apply that same impulse to cookies, with smashing success.

You'd be surprised how many kinds of candy you can mix into a basic cookie dough in lieu of chocolate chips. I have used Heath bars, Reese's peanut butter cups, malt balls, M&M's. At Christmas time, why not try adding candy cane bits to your Blondie? Combinations I've not tried, but bet would work, are Butterfingers or Kit Kats or Nestle Crunch bars. You even can break up a special dark or classic Hershey bar to have chunks rather than chips in your cookie.

Chopped malt balls make a tasty, unexpected swap for classic chocolate chips.
Chopped malt balls make a tasty, unexpected swap for classic chocolate chips.
Heath bars work in Ben & Jerry's ice cream. The toffee works smashingly in cookies, too!
Heath bars work in Ben & Jerry's ice cream. The toffee works smashingly in cookies, too!

Candy Bar Cookies Basics

If you want to riff on a classic, you've got to start with a classic. For cookies, that's the basic Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe, minus the chocolate chips and nuts.

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup butter or margarine, softened
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs
  • 12 ounces of your choice of candy (If you are using a whole chocolate bar, break the candy bar into small pieces. If you are using malt balls or peanut butter cups, cut them into small bits with a knife. Reese's also now makes mini peanut butter cups that are just a little bit bigger than a chocolate chip. These and M&M's you can do as a straight replacement.)

Directions

  • PREHEAT oven to 375 degrees F.
  • COMBINE flour, baking soda and salt in small bowl. Beat butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar and vanilla extract in large mixer bowl until creamy. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Gradually beat in flour mixture. Once mixed, add candy pieces. Place teaspoon-size drops of dough on a cookie sheet spaced about 2 inches apart.
  • BAKE for 9 to 11 minutes until the cookies are a nice golden brown.
  • Cool on baking sheets for 2 minutes; remove to wire racks to cool completely.

Twist the classic chocolate chip cookie recipe even more by putting the dough in a mini cupcake tin and depositing a Reese's mini peanut butter cup in each cookie-cupcake.
Twist the classic chocolate chip cookie recipe even more by putting the dough in a mini cupcake tin and depositing a Reese's mini peanut butter cup in each cookie-cupcake.
Stir candy bits into the dough as if they were chocolate chips.
Stir candy bits into the dough as if they were chocolate chips.

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Comments 4 comments

Simone Smith profile image

Simone Smith 5 years ago from San Francisco

These. Look. So. Dangerous.


s.carver profile image

s.carver 5 years ago from San Francisco Author

Indeed, they are. But at least I have finally posted a vegetarian-friendly recipe!


Ren Chin profile image

Ren Chin 5 years ago

is a cooling rack a must-have? does it help with the candy bar bits cooling? or can i just leave it on a baking sheet?


s.carver profile image

s.carver 5 years ago from San Francisco Author

I recommend using a cooling rack. When the cookie sheets come out of the oven, they are really hot, so if you leave the cookies on them until the cookie sheets cool, well, the cookies will continue to cook. It's best to leave the fresh-baked cookies on the cooling rack for a minute or two so they can set, but then remove them to a cooling rack where the air can circulate around the entire cookie, cooling it evenly and quickly, stopping it from overcooking.

Another plus of moving cookies onto a cooling rack is that you free up the cookie sheet so that it is ready to bake the next batch of cookies! Cooling racks can speed up things, making cookie-making more efficient.

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