Nature Blooms In Differences

Any priority given to exercise

in a morning walk

subtracts from nature

the reason I was here.

It is to such encounter

as is noise to the world of silence,

as intrusion

to the purpose of solitude.

Such encounter should come to see

to hear secrets that are invisible

to every other occupation.

Such encounter should wake us

from the poverty of our hurry

from the business of thought

cluttered already with tomorrow.


Fall seeks surrender in quiet dignity

before the the sovereign will of Winter.

The colors of its passing reign

cling to leaves surrendering

carpeting the ground beneath my step.

I wonder of the leaves

not indigenous to this rural land

they and their trees

are immigrants to this place.

Autumn Maple from the North

Red Oak from southern valleys,

Willow from the South

Hemlocks from the East

They neighbor with natural evergreens

free of any grievance at their occupation

free from burden or suspicion.

They simply are and take their place

each as neighbor to the other

with vitality and imported color.


There is no complaint of intrusion,

no protest of uninvited trespass,

just agreement, to blend and to compliment.

Nature does not fence its welcome with condition,

it is her pleasure to take from differences,

that which adds to splendor.

The integration of her immigrants,

is lost against the distance,

in the scattered color of her adopted children.

They root, indiscriminately and never gather to a place

because of sameness or common heritage.

Shrubs root in exquisite randomness

and grasses seed at will,

where ever there is unclaimed ground.

A collective color from scattered origins

without agenda or intended purpose,

but to be, to grow, to colonize.


I wonder of a subtraction from such beauty

were sameness a requisite of nature's imagination.

I wonder if man suffers such subtraction,

from his cautionary embrace,

of those who do not reflect his sameness?

I wonder why differences mark human minds in fear,

why human hearts are fenced with preferences of sameness.

Color that differs in appearance, in thought, in habit or heritage,

are after all, nothing more than human foliage on display.




Where copies do not exist
Where copies do not exist

odd that the beauty we find in nature

is gathered from the absence of sameness

yet, not so fondly held in our view of one another

Perhaps nature sees a beauty in itself

that human kind will come to know

that beauty flourishes in sovereignty,

where copies do not grow.




Comments 37 comments

xstatic profile image

xstatic 4 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

"Fall seeks its surrender in quiet dignity before the sovereign will of Winter..."

What an incredible line among so many others. From Nature as a living entity to Nature as metaphor for man in "his cautionary embrace of those who do not reflect his sameness."

This poem has much to say as do most of your writings, and will bear reading more than once.


Curiad profile image

Curiad 4 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

"I wonder of a subtraction from such beauty, were sameness, a requisite of nature's imagination."

Beautiful Alan, Introspective and representative of the spirit of nature.

Mark


Mhatter99 profile image

Mhatter99 4 years ago from San Francisco

Very thought provoking. Perhaps its me, but I see a different form of the original and yet, somehow the original carries on. Thank you for the reflection.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

This is so like a stroll through your mind, to admire the unique imagery of your ponderings and to inhale the fragrance of each of its blossoms in your seasonal garden's blooms of which you take intimate notice, experiencing and caressing each of them.

It's simply too rich an experience for me as reader for just one sitting, especially at this wee hour before I retire. But it's a lovely impression with which to retire for the night. I'll be back to read it again and absorb it more fully. What a treat it is! It's stirred my thought to notice and to plumb each of the images it describes so well against the background of its creator.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

. . . "where copies do not exist. . . "


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Good morning, Alan. It was a short 'night' but I'm awake & rested. I needed to get out the last of the trash for the weeks' early Friday pickup.

Just read "Nature Blooms in Differences" with brighter eyes and mind to feel, receive and perceive it more keenly.

Your vision relinquishes 'morning constitutional' purposes which ordinarily might be imposed upon a walk's chosen path. Instead, you've welcomed and embraced the deeper essence of subtlety in nature's quiet example of acceptance of presences within its wholeness of an extraordinary natural variety of differences. She imposes no regulations for permission to be there from the 'foreign' immigrants among the 'natives'. She knows that if they thrive, they can be there. It's how the planet became rich with life and growth. There really were no original natives on Earth's barren surface.

You observe its peaceful blending, as its differences are coordinated to further enrich the wholeness of the space occupied by all, rather than quarreling, confronting or clashing, as humans too often do in response to arrivals of interesting differences, or more accurately, to perceived dividing differences. A choice of focus.

Your poem is not only a beautiful treat emerging from your gentle spirit as it's experiencing, perceiving and expressing the beauty of nature's pregnant solitude accepting variety and displayed its extraordinary beauty; but from it, you've derived a vital, crucial lesson for its application to humans to simply observe the lesson & let our variety and divisions disappear into and enrich our own wholeness.

As you note, we're part of nature which accomplishes acceptance so inherently.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Good morning butterfly! After reading it this morning I realized that my hurried yesterday, published too soon. I felt it was imcomplete, not in thought, but in expression and so I made repairs so the reader would have clearer understanding of my intended meaning.

That you grasp it all without such repair is evidence of a keen mind, not of which I was unaware. I hope the repair adds clarity to words which wrote faster than my thought could feed.


Valleypoet 4 years ago

A great message is emanating from this poem Arb. From a philosopher's perspective your words convey a pantheism, man and nature of the same substance, and an expression of what is. But as this is poetry, and not philosophy, I read this as an expression of Arb the human being, writing about the hope that one day somewhere soon man can live together, as peacefully as the trees in the Forest, despite their differences..........:-))


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Hi Jim! Thanks for reading although I must apologise. The original reading was difficult to get one's mind around completely. The product of a hurried write. The repairs should convey my intent with additional clarity.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

hello Curiad! It was a treat to see you here and appreciated. Thank you my friend.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

thanks hatter, as always, for a welcomed comment. Perhaps there is no "original". Perhaps there is only different.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

As an original different, you would appreciate such description


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Hello Valleypoet! I suppose I am part philosopher, part poet and part confused; only the day will decide. You read well my friend. I wish that we would hail our differences and not separate ourselves from fear of them. Wishful thinking, but then, sometimes we live for a moment, vicariously. Always appreciate your comment. They speak, poet to poet.


cat on a soapbox profile image

cat on a soapbox 4 years ago from Los Angeles

Hello arb- How well you express your observations and your thoughts as you ponder the differences of assimilation between nature and mankind! It really does give us food for thought! As you know, I think we should all take our cues from nature. Our natural environment, left to her own devices, adapts and survives. It is man's intervention, good intentions or bad, that causes things to go awry.

I enjoyed this so much :)


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

I have to say I like both versions. I'm keeping both!

The original one you say was written too hastily captures a lofty spontaneity, while the revised version pins down and clarifies the message.It brings in or recharges some really lovely lines:

Color that differs in appearance, in thought, in habit or heritage,

are, after all, nothing more than human foliage on display.

Perhaps, one moment in such a place, would reveal a splendor

where copies do not exist.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

BTW - Are you aware that this hub is not mentioned on your profile page among your Contents? Surely everyone who would visit it may not be aware of it. I've looked in my own hubs for any setting that would instruct that a hub not be announced on the profile page and find none. I'm at a loss to explain it.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

@ cat, thanks for the read and your wonderful comment. I am of the opinion that nature was provided in order to teach us from pictures what we would otherwise fail to see.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

hello butterfly. When writing, we have the benefit of our thought filling in the blanks. The reader must sometimes labor incessantly to read our minds. I wonder that poetry ask a balance from the writer? Either way, I am more content filling in some blanks and leaving a little room for the reader to do the same. I did so enjoy the verse you chose and am happy that it was rewriten.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

I have noticed. The last one took 3 days to show up there. I think it has something to do with the new 24 hour thing which is really taking 48 hours.


drbj profile image

drbj 4 years ago from south Florida

There is so much food for thought in your beautiful profound poetry, arb, you know I will have to return more than once to soak it all in. Brilliant!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

That's accurate - we do get to fill in and fill out the blanks as we put our thoughts to paper or screen. And how apt the observation that readers, and, indeed, even people in face-to-face conversation, can't read our minds. It can be too easy to forget that, but if we really want to be understood, we must make ourselves and our words as honest, clear and concise as we can, still realizing that what is heard or seen is never exactly what is being expressed. It's the old thing about subjectivity, in that it filters whatever comes in from outside with its own experiences, willingness, attention to detail, general intelligence, even current health and emotional tone. So of course, what seems so very clear to ourselves may be a muddle and maze to someone else IF they even bother to give it more than passing notice.

Since so much of my poetry was written with no intention whatsoever of anyone else reading it (and hoped one person would not read it, or if so, that he would have no concept of what it was saying!) - it's surprising if & whether anyone can make sense of it, but I'm told they often do. Perhaps it's a difference in sharing it with more compatible minds!

But I definitely agree that it's good to clarify some and leave some to the recipient's resources. It's more likely to engage the reader when it's not all so 'cut and dried".

I like many of the verses in your 'Differences' poem but that one is special, Alan! Glad you enjoyed it again too!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 4 years ago from TEXAS

Yes, new hubs are 'pending' for 24 hours after first being published, but did you know that each time they're edited while they're pending, an additional 24 hours is added to the delay? Once they've fulfilled that hold period and have been displayed or "featured', though, any additional editing doesn't remove it from view.

You can choose to disclose idle hubs on your profile page, you know, though we're warned that it diminishes the overall "link strength" of all our hubs. But to choose to do it, anyway, go to My Account - Profile - Edit Profile, and check "yes" under "Show idle hubs on my profile."


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Hello drbj and thank you for reading. In some cases, brilliant is in the understanding of the reader.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Your poetry, I assure you, conveys all the sense in the world!


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Thanks Nellieanna for the info. I was not aware of any of this.


ImKarn23 profile image

ImKarn23 4 years ago

Oh, this was enchanting, sir!

A walk through nature - or - a microscope on society..

We humans need to learn respect - period! (i almost said that we need to learn respect - AGAIN, but lately - i've wondered if we ever had it...)

We need to learn respect for nature, for each other - and for OURSELVES!

We shame ourselves, first and foremost...

sigh.

voting and sharing forward - as deserved..]

Have a lovely sunday..


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Well Karn, I think our capacity to feel shame teaches us much about humility. I wonder sometimes if we fail to strike a balance regarding shame. Like all things. Some of us shame too easily and some seem immune. I suppose it exist in order to construct an acceptable civility, but then, who is it, that determines acceptable. Such question would be the basis for a most interesting hub which I think, fits you to a tee. I think you push the envelope just enough to make a point. I think it is a gift in the literary sense and in the femenine sense, alluring and provacotive. Perhaps you are all of the above. Such mystery will serve you well in both endevors.


c-m-hall profile image

c-m-hall 4 years ago from York, Maine

I like the part about the leaves ... immigrants to this place. I'm sure some of our trees come from outer space. Some other planet ... As perhaps some of us do too! Wonderful!!!


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Well cm! I think most of the people I like are from outer space. Maybe that says more about me than them.Ha ha.


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Alan - Such a different fall poem, different in every sense of the word. Quite marvelous actually. My favorite lines:

-- they and their trees are immigrants to this place.

-- The integration of her immigrants, is lost against the distance, in the scattered color of adopted children.

-- Shrubs root in exquisite randomness and grasses seed at will,

-- Perhaps, one moment in such a place, would reveal a splendor

where copies do not exist.

Such a pleasure to read and reread and savor. :) ~~Theresa


Natashalh profile image

Natashalh 4 years ago from Hawaii

That first picture caught my eye - azaleas and live oaks make the South one of the world's most beautiful places int he spring.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Good morning Theresa and thank you for such kind comments. This is a favorite of mine and I favor the lines you have pointed out. Thanks again.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Natashalh, thank you for the visit and kind remarks.


dreamseeker2 4 years ago

Pretty pics and great thoughts....found your poem and insight into nature interesting. Voted up!


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Hello dreamseaker2 and thanks for reading. Thanks for the vote, it is always appreciated.


Genna East profile image

Genna East 4 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

(I am tardy, again…so sorry, Alan, but needed a few weeks to take care of work demands.)

The title was the first to seize my attention and imagination. You have become a remarkable poet, Alan. Just a couple of gems in this wonderful poem:

“Nature does not fence its welcome with condition, it is her pleasure,

to take from differences, that which adds to splendor…”

“I wonder why differences, mark human minds in fear,

why human hearts are fenced with preferences of sameness.”

Nature is the always-present teacher for what has become the absent and absentminded student, humanity. Too many of us have become disassociated from our life support systems in far too many ways. The answers came to many questions long ago; we have only to observe them, as you have so perceptibly in your poetry. Up and much more.


arb profile image

arb 4 years ago from oregon Author

Hello Genna. Just got my computer back after it left for a fling with a handsome virus. Thanks so much for your gracious comment. I know your own love of nature brought this write a little closer to home than it did for others. The weather here tries to keep me at bay, but, I will walk again today and talk with what I see.

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