Top Tomato Tips: How to Plant Tomatoes

Leave Only Top 3-5" Exposed

This 8 inch tall starter tomato is planted deep, leaving only the top 4 inches above ground.
This 8 inch tall starter tomato is planted deep, leaving only the top 4 inches above ground. | Source

Early Tomato Care Produces Bountiful Results

Tomatoes are America's number one home garden vegetable. If you have room for just one crop, plant a tomato. Once a tomato starts producing, the gardener has tomatoes all season, until that first frost.

The key to a healthy tomato plant is healthy soil. Work organic matter into the soil before planting. After the tomato is planted, mulch for weed suppression and water conservation. Getting young transplants off to a good start will produce the most abundant harvests.

Choose tomato plants without any blooms or fruit. If there are blooms or fruit remove them. Give your plant time to establish a strong root system and healthy leaves. That early fruit will be disappointing and tasteless, so remove it before transplanting to the garden.

Only plant tomato plants early if you love the drama of running out and covering them up at every possible threat of frost. Or, wait to move plants into the garden after all danger of frost. Tomatoes will start growing vigorously when nighttime temperatures remain above 50 degrees.

There really is no advantage to buy big or tall (leggy) plants. Plant the tomato deep. Pinch of lower leaves and leave only the top 3-5 inches of the plant above ground. Deep roots will develop along the buried stem, helping the plant through the coming hot, dry season.

If cutworms are a problem, protect the base of the plant with a half of a toilet paper tube or a collar of waxed paper planting the collar 2 inches above the ground and 1 inch below.

Cage or Stake Tomatoes When You Plant Them

This 4" inch tall starter tomato looks dwarfed by the cage. Soon it will be producing half pound tomatoes.
This 4" inch tall starter tomato looks dwarfed by the cage. Soon it will be producing half pound tomatoes. | Source

Tomato Supports

Spacing

Trying to grow plants in close quarters will not result in more tomatoes. Space smaller tomato plants at least 2 feet apart. For the big, indeterminate plants, space 3 feet apart. Giving tomatoes plenty of room will prevent many disease outbreaks.

This year, I'm going to grow some big tomatoes and I am giving them plenty of room. I've chosen varieties that are known for producing large fruit. The plant stakes and cages go in as the little tomato is transplanted into the garden.

Stakes or Cages

Staked plants are less likely than unstaked plants to get diseases. Staking also improves yield, fruit set, fruit quality and makes harvesting easier.

Try a variety of methods for caging and staking tomato plants. Once you invest in a solid plant support method, you can use it for years with no additional expense. There are also several staking methods that are very economical. All University Extensions have helpful information on line. For example: G6461 Growing Home Garden Tomatoes - University of Missouri ...

I like using an 8 foot tall wooden stake. Pointed at one end, a 1 x 2-inch wooden stake will last for several seasons. Pound into the ground until it is sturdy and straight. Use soft cord or twine to tie the plant to the stake always leaving a little extra room for plant growth.

Consider winter storage space when choosing a tomato support method. For example the wooden stakes will last longer if stored in a dry area for the winter. Collapsible tomato cages are a cinch to store.

Gardeners can also use cylindrical wire cages. Mesh should be wide enough for a person's hand to fit through to pick ripe tomatoes. This method saves time required for staking, pruning and tying. If you grow several tomatoes, winter storage space may be a consideration.

Most heirlooms are Large-vined or indeterminate tomato varieties. These big plants will benefit from pruning out some of the auxiliary or side shoots to keep the plant from becoming too bushy or too tall. Remove side shoots to allow good light and air movement.

Be sure to give your new transplant a healthy drink of water.

More by this Author


Comments 10 comments

jpcmc profile image

jpcmc 4 years ago from Quezon CIty, Phlippines

Intersting. I'll check it out.


Patsybell profile image

Patsybell 4 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO Author

I think you might like to try heirloom tomatoes. I buy seed at Baker Creek. http://rareseeds.com/ Heirlooms are plant seeds passed down from generation after generation.


jpcmc profile image

jpcmc 4 years ago from Quezon CIty, Phlippines

Hi Patsybell. I'm thinking of planting different varieties and see how they thrive in our climate. I'm particularly fond of cherry tomatoes. They're great in salads.


Patsybell profile image

Patsybell 4 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO Author

jpcmc, in your area, tomatoes can be grown as perrinials. I've never lived where I could keep tomatoes year round. But I think it would be fun to try.


jpcmc profile image

jpcmc 4 years ago from Quezon CIty, Phlippines

These are excellent tips. I'm licky enough to hlive in a tropical country. I don't have to worry about frost. However, I do have to worry about typhoons.


Patsybell profile image

Patsybell 4 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO Author

It makes good sense to me. Trenching is ideal for leggy tomatoes. The straw adds water-retaining organic matter. Your dad had a great idea.


Malcolm Griffiths 4 years ago

Hi Patsy,

you have some great info. here; thank you.

My dad always used to plant his tomatoes in a trench lined with straw; not sure why but we still do it now and get a great crop.

I thought you may find this useful too...

www.how-to-grow-tomatoes.co.uk


Patsybell profile image

Patsybell 4 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO Author

Thank you. I appreciate the feed back.


sgbrown profile image

sgbrown 4 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

Very useful information! I have definitely had a problem with cut worms this year. I wish I had found your tip on the toilet paper roll earlier. Great hub, voted up, useful and sharing! Have a wonderful day! :)


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

I need to transplant some tomato plants right away. Thanks for these tips!

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Patsybell profile image

    Patsy Bell Hobson (Patsybell)214 Followers
    113 Articles

    I inherited my love of gardening from mother and grandmother. I am a garden blogger, freelance writer, Master Gardener emeritus.



    Click to Rate This Article
    working