How to Solder A Pipe

How to solder a Pipe

Tools Needed to Solder a pipe
Tools Needed to Solder a pipe
Photo A
Photo A
Photo B
Photo B
Photo C
Photo C
Photo D
Photo D
Photo E
Photo E
Photo F
Photo F
Photo G
Photo G

Soldering a Pipe

So you need to add a line for a new sink of some plumbing problem and you don’t want to hire a Plumber. Soldering a pipe together is not a hard thing to do. First make sure that the Water is off, and the line that you want to add or connect is dry. If you have any water running thru the pipe it will not solder. If it is wet when you start then dry it out. Also if you turned the water off in the house then open all sink valves so the water will drain out of the lines better

1. First cut the line where you need to repair or add a line. Us a pipe cuter, it males a nicer cut.

2. Clean the pipe where you are going to connect the new line. Photo A you can also use fine sandpaper.

3. Clean both sides of the fitting that you are going to connect. Photo B You can also use fine sandpaper.

4. Next using a Brush put Flux on both side of the pieces that you need to connect. Usually it is better to dry fit all pieces that you need to use. That way you can solder all the pieces at one time. See photo C and D

5. Next push them together making sure that they seat all the way into the fitting. Photo E

6. Next is to start soldering the pieces together. Add heat to the joint and let the solder go into the joint. You don’t need too much solder. Then take a rag and wipe around the joint. MAKE SURE YOU USE CARE TO NOT START A FIRE. I always keep a wet rag around and some water in case things get to hot. Also if you are soldering next to wood you can purchase a piece of fire proof material that will keep you from starting a fire.

7. After soldering all joints turn the water back on you are done. Remove Screens from one sink. Sometimes when the water have been off there are mineral deposits in the water that when you turn it back on it will make your sinks run slow. Also were you soldered the new joint I usually try to run the water a bit to clear out anything that might have been in the pipes.



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Comments 4 comments

handymanbill profile image

handymanbill 2 years ago from western pennsylvania Author

Thanks wilderness for the extra tip. Never though of that


wilderness profile image

wilderness 2 years ago from Boise, Idaho

My nemesis in home repair is soldering pipes - thanks for the instruction.

I might add a single tip: at times there will be a very slow drip at the joint to be soldered as water drains from other parts of the house. A piece of ordinary bread can be pushed into the pipe a ways upstream from the new joint - it will collect the water for a short time and keep the joint dry so it can be heated. Afterward, the bread will disintegrate and easily pass through the piping to an open faucet or toilet.


handymanbill profile image

handymanbill 4 years ago from western pennsylvania Author

Thanks for your visit to my hub and the vote


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

Wipe the remaining flux off with a wet rag. Any residue will cause corrosion on the copper. When the copper is properly heated, the flame will turn green, which is when you want to introduce your solder. Nice work, Bill!

Voted useful, interesting and up.

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