Do We Really Need Secure Borders? You Be the Judge

Mexican drug gang
Mexican drug gang
MS 13 drug gang
MS 13 drug gang
Arizona border sign
Arizona border sign
Cocaine seiure at border
Cocaine seiure at border


The U.S./ Mexico border is the primary point of entry for cocaine being smuggled into the United States. According to a recent interagency intelligence assessment, approximately 65 percent of the cocaine smuggled into the United States crosses the Southwest border. That would encompass California, Arizona and Texas

Criminal groups operating from Mexico smuggle cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, amphetamine, and marijuana into the United States Across our border. These criminal organizations have smuggled heroin and marijuana via these routes and distributed them throughout the United States since the 1970s. In addition to distributing cocaine and methamphetamine in the West and Midwest, these Mexico-based drug gangs now are attempting to expand their distribution of those drugs into the eastern U.S.

Traffickers operating from Mexico now control the wholesale cocaine distribution business throughout the western and mid-western United States. Mexico-based trafficking groups in cities such as Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Phoenix, San Diego, San Francisco, and Seattle control the distribution of massive quantities of cocaine

Pretty much all heroin produced in Mexico and South America is destined for the U.S Over the past decade, the United States has experienced a dramatic shift in the heroin market from the domination of Southeast Asian heroin to a dominance of the wholesale and retail markets by South American heroin, especially in the Eastern states. In the West, , "black tar" and, to a lesser extent, brown powdered heroin from Mexico have been, and continue to be, the predominant available form of this highly addictive opiate. According to the DEA, illegal immigrants and migrant workers frequently smuggle heroin across the U.S./Mexico border in 1- to 3- kilogram amounts for the major trafficking groups, seizures indicate that larger loads are being moved across the border, primarily in privately owned vehicles. Once the heroin reaches the United States, traffickers rely upon well-entrenched drug smuggling and distribution networks to deliver their product to the market, principally in the metropolitan areas of the mid-western, southwestern, and western United States with sizable Mexican immigrant populations.

Mexican drug trafficking organizations operating "super labs" (laboratories capable of producing in excess of 10 pounds of methamphetamine in one 24-hour production cycle) based in Mexico and in California have taken control of most of the production and distribution of methamphetamine on the continent. Independent laboratory operators, including outlaw motorcycle gangs, previously maintained control of methamphetamine production and distribution within the United States, and continue to operate today on a lesser scale. The entry of ethnic Mexican traffickers into the methamphetamine trade in the mid-1990s resulted in a significant increase in the supply of the drug. Mexican criminal drug organizations, based in Mexico and California, provided high-purity, low-cost methamphetamine originally to cities in the Midwest and West with large Mexican populations. They have since expanded their drug distribution territory into virtually every corner of the continental U.S.

According to, current and former U.S. law enforcement, defense and counterterrorism officials, Hezbollah, the Iran-backed Lebanese terrorist group, is using the same border routes, that Mexican drug Lords use, to smuggle drugs and people into the United States, the drugs are used to raise money to finance its operations. Of course if this and other terrorist groups, such as al Qaeda also can use Mexican trafficking routes to infiltrate operatives into the U.S., one might come to the conclusion that the lack of border enforcement is severly threatening U.S. national security.

U.S. Justice
U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA.)
The Washington Times (Friday, March 27, 2009)

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Comments 7 comments

jjmyles profile image

jjmyles 5 years ago from Pacific Northwest Author

Paul what we need is a secure border to keep the criminal element out of America. We have plenty of criminals of our own and do not need to import anymore of them!!

PaulStaley1 profile image

PaulStaley1 5 years ago from With the wind---(or against it)

We need more education. We need a more prosperous neighbor. Mexico is a wonderful country filled with North Americans just like us--cowboys and intellectuals alike. More cooperation between the two nations is what we need to have a stronger more secure North America--not walls--not a big gated community.

Hxprof 6 years ago from Clearwater, Florida

Your emphasis on drug smuggling into the US is right on target. Terror orgs. use the same methods for inserting their members into America.

You state, "Of course if this and other terrorist groups, such as al Qaeda also can use Mexican trafficking routes to infiltrate operatives into the U.S., one might come to the conclusion that the lack of border enforcement is severly threatening U.S. national security."

If you come to this conclusion then you have concluded well.

john t 6 years ago

By all means. Let's bring in the drug gangs and child rapists so you can have more mexicans making your damn burrito. To h e double L with the burros and the trash that comes with it. Go eat a square meal in a nice clean mom and pop joint for a change. Support your culture, not theirs. This is America.

James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 6 years ago from Chicago

You have done us a service with this needful and well written piece of work. Thank you for telling the truth. I think it is great.

jjmyles profile image

jjmyles 6 years ago from Pacific Northwest Author

So Evan, what you want is a global one world order filled with a bunch of drugged out lawbreakers?

Evan G Rogers profile image

Evan G Rogers 6 years ago from Dublin, Ohio

Ok, let's analyze your arguments a bit further:

1- Why are cocaine and heroine so bad? and why is the drug cartel so powerful?

Well, obviously, because the drugs are illegal. These drugs don't actually cost this much to produce - if i'm not mistaken, just about all of the illegal drug plants are actually weeds! They grow without care or help of humans (unlike asparagus or tomatoes). So, if we just let the stuff be legal, consumption would (probably) stay about the same, maybe go up a little bit, but then prices would PLUMMET. It would cost you less to grow a joint than it would to grow you a tomato. ... good bye cartels.

Also, if it were cheaper, people who are addicted could afford their habit without committing crimes! If a joint could be grown in your backyard, or a few ...hits? (i don't know the terminology)... of cocaine could be made in one's own backyard, crack wouldn't have been so bad.

Once again, and as always, government makes things worse.

2- what the heck is a "border", anyway?

What is a border? it's just a line that some bozos drew to say "my military, which i pay for by theft of my populace, reigns supreme here! And all people living in these lines are bound to my tyranny.". If someone wants to leave tyranny, then they should be allowed to. The declaration of independence let the 13 states secede from Britain, and I think that "walking north a few miles" is a fine declaration of secession from Mexico.

We should be welcoming the immigrants. I know many of them - they are fantastic workers compared to lazy ungrateful American teenagers who can't seem to figure out how much dressing to put on a salad. Whenever I go to a new Chipotle, I know immediately the quality of the burrito at that store by just looking at how many real mexican people are working there - the more, the better.

So let's get our heads out of our asses, realize that our problems are almost all created by government: the wars in iraq, afghanistan, and on drugs; the monetary inflation of the gov't-created Federal Reserve; and the god awful 30-50% taxes on real wealth we have to put up with in this country.

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