Raising Awareness About Even More Words, Phrases That Are Ad Nauseam

Celebrity, Dan Aykroyd wanted to start a campaign years ago to get the word, "like," erased from the English language
Celebrity, Dan Aykroyd wanted to start a campaign years ago to get the word, "like," erased from the English language | Source
My hero, Bugs Bunny
My hero, Bugs Bunny | Source
This graphic was used to raise awareness about a "No Tobacco Day"
This graphic was used to raise awareness about a "No Tobacco Day" | Source

Oscar-winning introduction

Do not. I repeat. Do not get upset, offended, or grow violently angry at me. This is a first-person look at something that seemingly is happening most all of the time in our country. I am all for it. So do not think that this is a feeble stab at being comical (as I usually try to be) for I want to show you that I "can" write a serious-minded hub.

Some time back, a fellow hubber, Catgypsy, wrote a very enlightening piece about a few words and phrases that she felt needed to be done away with due to her hearing them most everyday. I joined in agreement with her after reading her hub. (e.g. notice in my introduction, one of the over-used phrases, "Oscar-winning." The only entity I respect as "Oscar-winning," is my hero, Bugs Bunny).

Then to complement her hub, I wrote my own version of that hub and gave Catgypsy the credit for the inspiration. I received a few good comments. Thanks again, fellow followers for your comments on that hub and well, all of my hubs.

This was a popular graphic to raise awareness about protecting the zebra
This was a popular graphic to raise awareness about protecting the zebra | Source
We can always count on the old reliable bull horn to capture attention on ads telling us to "raise awareness on bland color bull horns"
We can always count on the old reliable bull horn to capture attention on ads telling us to "raise awareness on bland color bull horns" | Source

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Enough is enough

Attention people and groups who insist on "raising awareness" on this, that, and the other: Hey, "we," the American people "are" aware. We are not dozing on the job, asleep at the wheel and so on. And if you think we are not aware of something, just tell us about the bottom line you are hiding from us. We would be happy to be more aware of what cause you are championing if you would just sit down, phone us or hey, send us an email about your cause and we would band together to get others to "know" as much as possible about what you are worried about.

So now, here I go again writing from the same stance, same mindset and in an unapologetic-but-helpful-attitude.

My topic is:

Raising Awareness About Even More Words, Phrases That Are Ad Nauseam

Hands raised are a sign of a group raising awareness on a certain cause
Hands raised are a sign of a group raising awareness on a certain cause | Source
Vet walking across America to raise awareness on the treatment of Vietnam vets
Vet walking across America to raise awareness on the treatment of Vietnam vets | Source
 Man walks across  nation in 2015 to  raise awareness for  some problem that I forgot
Man walks across nation in 2015 to raise awareness for some problem that I forgot | Source
Photos of groups getting together mean one of two things: One, a protest or two, they are raising awareness on something as a group
Photos of groups getting together mean one of two things: One, a protest or two, they are raising awareness on something as a group | Source
People marching on a government building is a neat way to raise awareness on something of a national nature
People marching on a government building is a neat way to raise awareness on something of a national nature | Source
A group holding up signs with messages easily raises awareness on any cause or problem
A group holding up signs with messages easily raises awareness on any cause or problem | Source
Overweight  guy on  bike rides across nation  raising awareness on how ugly overweight people are being treated
Overweight guy on bike rides across nation raising awareness on how ugly overweight people are being treated | Source
Does this poster raise your awareness on what is written on the front of the poster?
Does this poster raise your awareness on what is written on the front of the poster? | Source
This artwork always gets my attention on having my awareness raised on a certain cause
This artwork always gets my attention on having my awareness raised on a certain cause | Source
The late George Carlin had a routine where he started his performance with telling words and phrases that he was not going to use
The late George Carlin had a routine where he started his performance with telling words and phrases that he was not going to use | Source
Super-funny Steve Byrne's routine of "Know whut I'm saying?" is simply hilarious
Super-funny Steve Byrne's routine of "Know whut I'm saying?" is simply hilarious | Source

This guy was raising awareness on the homeless issue and he only did this as a non-profit venture

Emilia Clarke talks like Valley Girl

"With That Being Said" - - (which I have heard so much that I get nauseated), let's continue with my hub with other words and phrases that I wish were eradicated from our vocabulary.

"Like" - - Saturday Night Live alum, Dan Aykroyd, started a movement of national proportions to get this word, 'like,' banned from our vocabulary. This is why I love Aykroyd. I have heard "like this," or "like that," and "like, you are going to like, uh, love, uhhh . . ." until I almost vomit. Sorry teenagers of 2016 stretching all the way back to 1990 plus the "twenty-somethings" who try to hold onto their fading youth by interjecting 'like' into their conversations.

"Bromance" - - used when two males are great friends. Why not just use the terminology, "great friends?" No. Someone with a lot of time on their hands just had to start this asinine phrase. Frankly, I am "great friends" with a lot of guys. But none of us are into a 'bromance' with other males. Call us backward. Call us "out of the loop." I could care less.

"Out of The Loop" - - annoying to say the least, but not nauseating. Yet. But give it time.

"Digits" - - this means giving someone (a girl giving a guy her phone number) their phone number. Another useless term. "Phone number" has worked well for years, so why change it?

"The 4-1-1" - - give a busy-body needed information on something that is definitely not of any concern to them. "4-1-1" is what I use to get a phone number from my phone company that's not listed in their phone book. Or should I say, "digits book?"

"Whatever" - - is still hanging around from the 1980's. My grandson has tried to use this when I ask him to do something for me. Then I reply, "whatever . . .what? . . .who?" The look on his face is priceless.

"Zin Master" - - was tacked onto former Los Angeles Lakers coach, Phil Jackson who is a legend among NBA coaches. Jackson reportedly fused an atmosphere of peace among the players in the locker room and on the floor creating a flow or positive energy thus leading them to win several World Championships. Jackson did this while coaching the Chicago Bulls, FYI.

"FYI" - - (notice how I just jump from one term to the other in my own machine gun-like fashion)? People used to say for your information, when they were about to spill something that others did not know. Some lazy person thought, "Hey, it takes 2.2 seconds to say that entire phrase, 'for your information,' so I will start a time-saver in the form of 'FYI."

"Word Up, Word" - - a two-fer. This one's roots is found in the Hip Hop Movement started in the mid-1990's used by performers who went on to be successful rappers, rapper film stars and rapper television show stars. I suppose these two terms mean: "I agree." Okay. What happened to "yes?" What "yes" not cool? Can you see how stupid the reasons are for using "these" now-worn-out words and phrases?

"Know Whut-I'm Sayin'" - - super-hilarious Steve Byrne did a stand-up gig recently on television and he did this rant about people misusing this term. Say the term. It is really a question. And Byrne went on to display how he handles it when a person starts in with the "know whut-I'm saying," he instantly replies, "No, I do not see what you're saying?" "What do you want me to know?" This comedy bit is one of the reasons that I like him.

"Chill" - - you'd think that this term "went south" when the rapping thing peaked, but naawww. I heard it on an episode of "NCIS: Los Angeles," a few months ago and the producers of this show want viewers to view this show as modern, upgraded and laid-back. Yeah, right.

"Yeah, Right" - - people who love to use sarcasm to reply to your comment use this term too much. Way too much. It's very annoying when a sarcasm-advocate uses "yeah, right" and then rolls their eyes out of sight into their heads.

"Circle The Wagons" - - okay. I will compromise, but in a slight amount. John "Duke" Wayne and other stars of the Old West television shows and films used this to warn settlers (traveling via wagon train to California to start a new life) to get the wagons in a circle and find something to hide behind to protect themselves against arrows and flaming torches used as weapons by an angry tribe of Indians who did not like for "white men" to encroach on their territory.

"Fill Me In" - - is used by people who want us to believe that they are super busy with this project and doing something with that project and depending on us to "bring them up to speed" on whatever event or news is available.

"Up To Speed" - - See above explanation.

"Racially Insensitive" - - I thought that the term, "bigotry" was what people of other races said when us white folks used terms that they found objectionable. Maybe not. So with a quick slight of hand, the "Politically Correctness Cops" were told by overly-sensitive liberals to not use or correct any of us "ignorant lambs" who used a bigoted term, but to teach them on the spot that what they said was "racially insensitive." Thus, this softens the term, "bigot." Why do I write a lot to say so little?

"Yo" - - stands for "hey, look here." That is all I got for this one. No it's not. I have grown very weary of hearing "yo" so much that I am afraid that I am going "yo yo."

Note: there is a term that is being tossed about loosely that refers to a female. And it does rhyme with "witch." No, it is not "that" word, but a twisted version of the word and I refuse to use it on this or any of my hubs. I had rather choose wisely to keep my female followers than know that I used the version of "witch," the newly-strung-out version.

George Carlin, did I make you proud?

Good night, Belmont, Mississippi.

© 2016 Kenneth Avery

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Comments 3 comments

Jodah profile image

Jodah 5 months ago from Queensland Australia

This is a very worthwhile Kenneth. I hate most of these terms as well, especially "Like", "Whatever", and "Yo". "At the end of the day" is another I dislike. Well done.


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 5 months ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

Hello, my good friend, Jodah,

Thank you so much for the supportive comment. I mean it.

Sometimes a good vent via hubs helps.

Write me anytime and have a peaceful night.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 5 months ago from Queensland Australia

No problem, Kenneth, feel free to read some of my newer hubs anytime also.

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