Say it Ain't So, Joe -- Repercussions of the Penn State Scandal


Shoeless Joe Jackson and others on the White Sox conspired to fix the 1919 World Series in what became known as the Black Sox Scandal. “Say it Ain’t So, Joe,” a boy reacted, and those words became famous. That was a baseball scandal. Shoeless Joe Jackson has the third highest batting average, .356, in major league history. Nobody in authority has ever suggested that points be taken off his batting average that I know of. There has been some talk lately that he should be considered for the Hall of Fame.

Joe Paterno almost became the head coach of the Pittburgh Steelers way back in 1969, just before the black and gold glory days began. When he declined the job, it was offered to Chuck Noll. Joe Pa went on to become the winningest coach in major college football history. No more. Today, he went from number one to number eight on the list, as a result of the sanctions announced by the NCAA today. This was not a football scandal.

Joe Paterno is dead. God will be his ultimate judge. Jerry Sandusky will die in jail. Athletic director Tim Curley and vice president Gary Schultz face perjury charges for lying to the grand jury. The president of the university, Graham Spanier, issued a statement during the grand jury business saying he unconditionally supported Curley and Schultz and that they “operate at the highest levels of honesty.” Lol. Reminds me of a president who once said, “I never had sex with that woman.”

Sandusky is one sick puppy. The others mentioned above were enablers, and some committed crimes in doing so. There are consequences for your actions, in the cases of those mentioned above, the consequences are likely to fit the crime. The university itself faces millions of dollars in civil liability due to lawsuits.

The NCAA should have left most to this to the courts to resolve, the jurisdictions where it belongs. The mission of the NCAA is, or was, to enforce sports-related infractions. To infer that it’s actions today are to subvert the “football is God” mentality is absurd.

The current number one college football team, Alabama, has been off NCAA probation for a whole six weeks in 16 sports, after serving its third probation since 1995. USC, the projected number one college football team, is currently on probation and subject to reduction of scholarships and other sanctions. Penn State is one of the few schools that has never been placed on probation.

Hey, $60 million for child abuse victims is a great thing. Penn State likely would have done something similar on its own. But the NCAA took unilateral action that circumvented its own rules. Help and compensation for past victims and future victims of child abuse could have been accomplished in better ways than what the NCAA did.

Again, the issue here is a very sick person who systematically abused children over a long period of time, and a select group of others who enabled that behavior. Shame on them.

But this is not about football. Past and present and future students at Penn State have nothing to do with this tragedy. Penn State has enough issues to deal with without the NCAA piling on. Talk about overkill.

Personally, I believe that Penn State, the university, the students, the administration, the faculty, the alumni, and everyone associated with the program, will do far more to help the victims of child abuse than NCAA sanctions ever could.

Putting names on the uniforms would have helped if "Redd" was one of the names
Putting names on the uniforms would have helped if "Redd" was one of the names

Repercussions September 1, 2012

The “new era” of Penn State football began at State College in front of over 97,000 spectators and untold numbers watching on television with a more than disappointing 21-14 loss to Ohio U. Who?

You can blame this one on the NCAA and its arbitrary and capricious sanctions, mostly based on a document known as the Freeh Report that is full of errors, misrepresentations, and downright lies.

The best player on the Nittany Lions last season unfortunately was no where to be found at Beaver Stadium this Saturday. No indeed, Silas Redd was 2,800 miles away at USC hardly working up a sweat as he scored a touchdown and carried the ball 9 times for 56 yards.

We don’t even need to mention the other players Penn State lost because of the sanctions. Silas Redd would have made the difference. Penn State was up 14-3 at the half. Ohio U. scored 21 unanswered points in the second half. You don’t think if Penn State had Silas Redd they wouldn’t have pounded the rock in the second half and won the game?

More repercussions to follow soon.

There is a whole lot more to be decided before this case is closed.

More repercussions September 8, 2012

Nittany Iions lose 17-16 to the Virginia Cavaliers.

Why?

Blame it on the NCAA and the sanctions. Penn State veteran field goal kicker Anthony Fera transferred to Texas just before the season started. Fera made 14 of 17 field goals last season. Newbie field goal kicker missed 4 today, including one that would have won it at the end.

The rest of the story:

Penn State pulled it together and finished 8-4, losing to Ohio State and Nebraska. Bill O'Brien established that he was the right choice for the coach.

And now we wait on the outcome of criminal trials and civil suits.

In my opinion, the NCAA will ultimately have no choice to eat some crow and reduce the sanctions.

Update February 11, 2013:

Yesterday the Paterno family issued its own report, which is basically a review of the Freeh Report, calling it a "total failure" that is "full of fallacies."

Exactly. And the NCAA used the Freeh Report as the basis to administer sanctions? Pathetic.

Update February 22, 2013:

In the last few day it should have become perfectly clear to most everyone hat the NCAA is a farce. NCAA President Mark Emmert and his staff totally botched the investigation of the University of Miami. Specific information is all over the internet and sports talk shows pertaining to the subject, so I won’t repeat it. I will say that credibility is destroyed when you do something you have punished others for doing. The NCAA imposes sanctions for “lack of organizational control” when its own house is a mess. Pathetic.

So Penn State gets the brunt of the blame for the Sandusky scandal while others who also contributed to the fiasco get a hall pass, as least so far. Kathleen Kane, the new attorney general of Pennsylvania has launched an investigation into why Tom Corbett, now the governor and former attorney general, took almost three years to arrest Sandusky. Good question. Here’s the thing. The government to include law enforcement, Children Services, and the Department of Public Welfare all should take blame for not handling the Sandusky matter properly. If they had, we would not have a Penn State scandal.

And then we still have the criminal trials of Penn State officials pending.

My prediction is that these sanctions against Penn State are going to be substantially revised. I have no problem with the money this is costing Penn State. I do have a problem with innocent parties like students being punished via the sanctions.

Update July 14, 2013

Last week the former president of Penn State, Graham Spanier, initiiated a libel and defamation law suit against Louis Freeh.

Penn State is negotiating financial settlements with more than 30 individuals who have come forward with sexual abuse claims. Penn State will not release details until the deals have been completed.


More by this Author


Comments 42 comments

jeolmoz2 profile image

jeolmoz2 4 years ago from Florida, USA

This is bad for Penn State, Brother...It's The Death Penalty for their Football Program


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

What I'm wondering, jeolmoz2, is if Mark Emmert and the NCAA Executive Committee will now apply similar sanctions to the Catholic Church for facilitating and covering up child sexual abuse to protect the image of said church.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Brent Musberger called the game right this morning on Mike & Mike. He usually does call the game right.

Brent, to paraphrase, said he was terribly terribly disappointed in the NCAA. He said the NCAA reached way beyond their authority and completely missed the point.

Exactly.


jeolmoz2 profile image

jeolmoz2 4 years ago from Florida, USA

Agree fines & penalties r self-serving 4 NCAA...it's PR work4 their image...will b more impress if any victims recvd $$ instead having sue in court n wait yrs compensated...it's all PR, brother. NCAA gets immediate action but real victims do not!


jeolmoz2 profile image

jeolmoz2 4 years ago from Florida, USA

How bout Notre Dame Coach Brian Kelly practicably forces a kid up an unsecure tower to film practice n kid falls 2 his death, but he got his team on field same lk nothin had happened, when press asked him he said quote "... he would've us play...Irish Tradition" Where was NCAA then? With their fines, investigation & sanctions? That kid lost his life 'cause coach needed someone film practice?


Wendell Patterson profile image

Wendell Patterson 4 years ago from Alabama

I agree that the NCAA has entered into uncharted waters but the magnitude of this situation is like no other that we have ever seen. Their facility was used as terror chamber for Sandusky henious acts and the truth will never been know of how much Joe Pa knew which I am assuming that he knew a lot base on the Freesh report but the fact of the matter is that he is not here to defend himself and he will face his own judgement. The bottomline is that Penn St. signed off on these penalties and I am sure from fear of the death penalty. I don't agree with the NCAA neccesarily getting involved but it's nobody's fault but Penn St allowing the cover up of Sandusky action. Great hub by the way


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Good point, jelomoz2, about where was the NCAA in the Notre Dame incident. The university did its own investigation and it was nobody’s fault. Yeah, right.

Yes, Wendell Paterson, Penn State signed off on the penalties. And now we have controversies over that. Members of the Board of Trustees are saying they were not consulted prior to the consent agreement being entered into. The Paterno family is crying foul. One alumni group is advocating the ouster of the entire board. I think the new president, Rodney Erickson, already is in some trouble. He may not last long. The entire matter was handled poorly by everybody, but especially so by the NCAA.

And another thing. In 1998 sexual abuse allegations were brought against Sandusky. Of course the police investigated, as did the Dept. of Public Welfare. The Centre County DA, Ray Gricar, declined to press charges. Why not, nobody knows, exactly. Gricar mysteriously disappeared in 2005. Many who are now reviewing documents from back then say charges should have been filed. If they had, perhaps none of the rest of this would have happened.

What I’m saying is that there were plenty of others guilty of enabling Jerry Sandusky by their actions, or inactions, not just Penn State people. The Penn State people responsible are being punished within the criminal system, as it should be.

The victims in this case will be taken care of, as best as can be done under the circumstances. That would have happened without the NCAA. Some of the victims will be receiving huge financial settlements.

What happens to your typical child abuse victim? The predator may go to jail, but do the victims receive any compensation?


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

So today the Penn State Board of Trustees met with President Rodney Erickson to express concern over him rolling over for the NCAA. Read about it here:

http://www.ktvn.com/story/19114641/ap-source-psu-t...

No reporters were allowed, but no doubt some of what went on will be leaking out.

It would not surprise me if the Board of Trustees takes some legal action to void this consent agreement. It also would not surprise me if the student body and alumni initiate some sort of class action.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

This is quite interesting:

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/ncaaf-dr-saturday/vi...

So Victim 4 does not agree with the sanctions on Penn State.

Maybe somebody should have talked to the victims, do you think?


Cassandra C 4 years ago

I am a current student of Penn State main campus, class of 2014. I recently wrote a letter to the editor that was published in my local newspaper a couple days ago. So far there are no rebuttals. One excerpt, "It's bad enough that there are victims of Sandusky. It is not fair to add more than 40,000 more victims, who are the students of Penn State, who are being hurt every time the media writes about our great school and community. I will not allow people to criticize my degree over a scandal that actually took place when I was barely 10 years old."


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Cassandra, please post the link to your letter if it is online.

Every Penn State student and alumni I have personally spoken to feels the same way you do. My daughter is starting Penn State, albeit one of the campuses, next month. Her oldest brother is a Penn State graduate. Her best friend will be a sophomore at main campus. They and others I have spoken to echo your sentiments.

In today’s issue of USA TODAY, on page C1, it says, “Penn State President Rodney Erickson on Wednesday said if he had not accepted the package of sanctions the NCAA announced this week, the school’s football program would have been shut down for four years.”

Does somebody besides me have a big problem with this?


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Franco Harris, of Immaculate Reception fame, said today:

"The NCAA should have never got involved in a case like this. Secondly, Penn State definitely should not have accepted it. We need people to fight for Penn State. The inactions of our board speaks loud and clear about how they don't work to protect Penn State."

Exactly.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Of course there have been numerous hubs written in the last several days about this Penn State business.

Now here is somebody who actually has a clue:

http://keithengel.hubpages.com/hub/Crucifying-Pate...

Like I said in my comment on that hub, what we have here is a feeding frenzy and mob mentality created in large part by the media, and played to by the NCAA.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

I posted the following on another hub yesterday and am waiting for someone to credibly dispute any of it:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Who enabled Jerry Sandusky, the nut case, who will die in jail?

1. Joe Paterno. He’s dead.

2. PSU Vice President Gary Schultz and Athletic Director Tim Curley, both of whom will likely be doing hard time for perjury. And PSU President Graham Spanier who also may go to jail. Maybe not. In any event, his career and reputation are ruined.

3. Back in 1998, the District Attorney, Department of Public Welfare, Children Service, and police investigators copped out (no pun intended). In reviewing the documents from back then, many conclude charges should have been filed against Sandusky. If they had been, the rest of this tragedy likely would have not happened.

4. The parents of the victims. With a few exceptions. Your child is being sexually abused over a long period of time, and you have no clue?

5. Sandusky’s wife and other close family members.

6. The media. They were able to figure out Tiger Woods was doing a bunch of hot babes. Why couldn’t they figure out Jerry Sandusky was doing a bunch of young boys for years and years?

7. Penn State students and alumni. NOT. PSU will pay out far more in civil lawsuits than what the NCAA billed them for, and this cost will to some extent be borne by the students, alumni, and taxpayers.

Anybody with a brain bigger than a pea can figure this one out. There’s plenty of blame to be passed around, but PSU students and alumni don’t deserve any of it.

The NCAA is a kangaroo court.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

There are several other hubs out there written about the Penn State situation. One of them is "Justice comes to Penn State finally!" by joelomoz2. Yesterday I posted this on that hub:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On Nov. 9, 2011, Joe Paterno announced his retirement and stated, “I am absolutely devastated by the developments in this case. I grieve for the children and their families, and I pray for their comfort and relief. This is a tragedy. It is one of the great sorrows of my life. With the benefit of hindsight, I wish I had done more.”

Joe Paterno could have done more. He said so. So could have many other people not associated with Penn State.

Joe Paterno did not commit any crimes. He did not attempt to cover up anything. That is my tentative conclusion after reviewing the grand jury testimony, the Freeh Report, and whatever other evidence I can find.

I say “tentative” because there may be more to the story than currently meets the eye. We apparently are going to have some perjury trials, and we may get to the bottom of some more of this. Civil trials may also offer some revelations.

We don't know for sure if others at Penn State covered up anything, yet. We can suspect they did because the grand jury report indicated that Athletic Director Tim Curley and Vice President Gary Schulz were not credible witnesses. Why weren't they credible witnesses so said the grand jury report? The best I can determine is that it is because their testimony conflicted with Mike McQuery's.

Talk about a rush to judgement and feeding frenzy.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Well, nobody really wanted to debate me on the hub referred to above, but I am engaged in meaningful conversation on this one entitled "Penn State's NCAA verdict":

http://hubpages.com/sports/Penn-States-NCAA-Verdic...


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

On the “Penn State’s NCAA Verdict” hub referenced above, LanaLu, who also wrote her own hub on the subject entitled said:

“Blackandgoldjack - Everyone has an opinion and can freely state their opinion, but when reading about the NCAA and Some of us have followed the story from the beginning because maybe we attended Penn State or maybe we have family and friends playing football so its a view point in which people provide... Penn State will recover from this and No students don't deserve to be punished along with the staff, however, I stand by the NCAA when they say Education and Safety comes first. Speaking from a professional point of view with sexually abused victims, No matter the amount of money the school is penalized for will not take away the emotional hurt and problems caused to students by such behavior, it simply is NOT acceptable no matter how you twist and turn the story. These are people we trust with our children and for them to take advantage and look away as it happens is pure WRONG.”

To which I responded:

“LanaLu, since you say you are speaking from a professional point of view with sexually abused victims, let me ask you a question:

What is your professional opinion of what transpired concerning sexual abuse allegations against Sandusky in 1998 in which the police, PA Department of Public Welfare, Children and Youth Services, and the district attorney were all involved?”


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

kbralwill, who wrote the hub posted this in response my comment:

“Blackandgoldjack, my thoughts on your comments are as follows - there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that suggests that Sandusky did in fact commit this crime (and he was convicted on the vast majority of the counts against him), and it seems beyond doubt to me based on the reports that I have heard that Joe Paterno and members of the Penn State administration at the very least were negligent in their actions, enabling further abuse of children by Sandusky. And at the very worst, they knowingly attempted to conceal these heinous actions, becoming complicit in the crimes. Whether they knew all of the details or not about what happened, and I strongly believe they did, it was their job to know. At Penn State University, at least for a time, football seems to have become more important than the welfare of children, so I have no problem if the university as a whole suffers at least a little.”

And LanaLu posted this in response to my comment:

“Blackandgoldjack - I will not turn this article into a debate between the two of us and it is clear to me that you disagree with the NCAA and that you must be a Football fan but so am I... I have come across many cases in the last few years which sexual crimes were committed but justice was never served due to lack of evidence and fear of victims coming forth... All I can tell you is that victims of sexual abuse find it difficult to come forth and admit what happen because for athletes especially, they have a reputation to uphold and their mental though is that if the truth comes out their reputation will be shattered... If you are further more interested in the topic due some research, it might help you understand it slightly better rather than support such behavior...”


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

I then posted this in response to those two comments:

"You made some interesting points in your last comment, kbralwill. You appear willing to think this through, unlike some others. Let’s elaborate on some points you made.

First, no one is questioning that Sandusky is guilty. Interestingly, one charge he was not convicted of was rape of the child in the shower in the incident in 2001 when Mike McQueary stumbled upon them. That incident, and the conflicting testimony from Mike McQueary as opposed to that of Curry and Schultz, will be crucial in their criminal trials.

Now, you indicate, “. . . members of the Penn State administration were at the very least negligent in their actions . . .”

I would agree with that statement with one qualification. They enabled further abuse of children ON PENN STATE PREMISES (to include functions such as bowl games).

That is why Penn State will pay millions of dollars to settle civil suits. They would be found guilty in civil court of negligence in allowing this to happen on Penn State premises, by a preponderance of the evidence. I suspect Penn State will settle most of these claims before they get to court.

To determine the truth of, as you say, “. . . conceal these heinous actions, becoming complicit in the crimes . . .” lets attempt to answer a few questions:

Did Sandusky abuse children other places than Penn State premises?

Did Sandusky abuse children long before this incident in 2001 involving Mike McQueary?

If the incident in 2001 involving Mike McQueary had been reported to the proper authorities, would that have stopped the child abuse?

kbralwill, you also say “. . . it was their job to know” meaning Penn State.

Were any of the people implicated in this scandal from Penn State trained to recognize child abuse? How about the people at Second Mile? What about the authorities to whom the 1998 incident of alleged child abuse was reported?

How would you answer these questions, kbralwill? Of course our self-proclaimed resident expert on child sexual abuse, LanaLu, is welcome to weigh in. Or anybody else.

And to LanaLu, excuse me? It appears to me that you insinuated that I support child sexual abuse. Is that what you are saying?


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

sportsfather then posted this:

“I think everyone agrees what happened at Penn State was wrong on so many levels. Obviously Sandusky should rot in his cell for the rest of his life. But that's not the point of this hub. The question was whether or not the actions by Sandusky and members of the PSU administration and athletic department warranted NCAA sanctions.

People need to remember that the NCAA is not a court of law. They can quite frankly do whatever they want. Members of an athletic program don't have to break a law in order to receive NCAA sanctions. USC didn't break any laws and they were beaten up pretty good by the NCAA. Same with Ohio State. SMU didn't break any laws to my knowledge and the NCAA completely imploded their football program.

But, PSU is a "member" of the NCAA. And as a "member" of the NCAA, they must agree to hold themselves in accordance with the standards they agreed to when joining the NCAA. And when a member of a teams coaching staff is molesting children, that isn't holding themselves in accordance with NCAA standards. Even worse, the head coach had knowledge of this, moved it up the ladder, and then conveniently forgot that it actually happened and played the "I did my part" card. Unfortunately, the real world doesn't work like that.

If Jim Tressel reported the tats for trophies issue to Gene Smith and Gene Smith sat on it while both "conveniently" forgot about it, they both would be canned in two seconds. Fortunately for Gene Smith, he Tressel never forwarded him the info so it was insulated to Tressel.

And let's get realy here. A member of a coaching staff molesting children and a head coach acting like it never happened is FAR worse than what OSU, USC, SMU, or any other team receiving large penalties ever did.”


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

LanaLu then posted this:

"Blackandgoldjack: you stated "It appears to me that you insinuated that I support child sexual abuse. Is that what you are saying?" Absolutely NOT & I apologize if the statement came out as such... You just seem to feel strongly about the NCAA not making the right choices to show ALL Universities and other schools that Education comes before Athletics (could be a misunderstanding on my part).... Lets all face it we all have our own view of things in here on this topic and highly doubt we can come to an agreement so personally I am going to Agree to Disagree and close this door. Look forward future hubs..."

And I posted this to her and sportsfather:

"First of all, sportsfather,Sandusky was not a member of the Penn State coaching staff when the incidents that prompted the NCAA sanctions occurred. Sandusky retired in 1999. He was, however, as a long-time significant employee, given access to Penn State premises. Therein lies the problem for Penn State in terms of civil liability for negligence in that sexual abuse of children occurred on Penn State premises.

You’re exactly right, sportsfather, when you stated, “People need to remember that the NCAA is not a court of law.” So why are have they acted as a court of law? The NCAA does not have the resources or expertise to deal with criminal matters.

The distinction between breaking rules and breaking laws is an important one, if made properly. The universities you mentioned, Ohio State, USC, and SMU broke rules pertaining to such things as recruiting, “paying” athletes in one way or another, and other activities that gave those universities an unfair competitive advantage.

What NCAA rule(s) did Penn State break, and how did that give them a competitive advantage?

What laws did the powers that be at Penn State break?

I do not agree with your evaluation of what Joe Paterno did. Basically, he followed the procedures, reporting through the chain of command. Now, he himself said that, in hindsight, he could have done more. A whole lot of people, not just those connected with Penn State could have done more.

Again, why wasn’t Sandusky charged with child sexual abuse in 1998? Nobody seems to want to answer that question. In this instance, Penn State did report alleged child abuse to the proper authorities. Authorities like the police, the Pa Department of Public Welfare, Children and Youth Services, and the district attorney.

Actually, if anyone is really interested in preventing child abuse, the above question regarding what happened in 1998 is more important than what Penn State did not do.

LanaLu, if the NCAA is trying to show all universities that education comes before athletics, why did they create a scenario like NFL free agency such that there is a bidding war for Penn State’s top players? Why did the NCAA permit West Virgina to switch to the Big 12 and fly to Texas and Oklahoma this season instead of driving up I-79 for a little over an hour and play Pitt? How does that benefit education over athletics? I could go on and on.

In my opinion, the NCAA played kangaroo court and administered sanctions beyond the scope of its authority, and worse than that, without properly investigating the matter. The NCAA jumped on the tune of the feeding frenzy and did what was politically correct, rather than what was right. I’ll say it again, the NCAA is a joke."


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

To which sportsfather responded:

"You are right about Sandusky not "actually" being a coach at the time. But as you mentioned, he was a significant member of the Penn State football program who was still very much a presence in the locker room/football field. Teams/coaches ban certain individuals from even coming into the stadium if they feel they have bad intentions (OSU did it to a photographer last year). Sandusky had a presence in the PSU football program.

And you bring up an interesting point about the "competitive advantage" argument. But I ask you this, how did Ohio State players receive a competitive advantage for getting tattoos in exchange for memorabilia? It doesn't have to directly give a team/player a competitive advantage for it to be shown in a negative light by the NCAA.

And you said this, " So why are have they acted as a court of law? The NCAA does not have the resources or expertise to deal with criminal matters." To my knowledge, they did not act as a court of law. They didn't have anyone arrested, charged, or convicted of a crime. They simply laid down sanctions no different than an governing body in sports. It is no different than any other sport. The NHL and NFL suspend players regularly for their actions off the ice/field (PacMan Jones anyone?).

You are operating under the assumption that the NCAA only has the authority to punish players/programs for actions that provide a competitive advantage on the football field. That just simply isn't the case. Then technically a player could be arrested for drug trafficing and still play football in your opinion because it didn't provide a "competitive advantage." The NCAA should never and will never let the schools/players under their umbrella act in that manner without some sort of consequences.

Listen, I gather that you're a Penn State fan and obviously this is a sensitive topic for you. Lord knows I feel for the good PSU fans that don't deserve what's happened (some of the best fans in college sports in my opinion). But you honestly can't believe that only Jerry Sandusky is to blame here. Do I think the NCAA took the sanctions a little too far? Yes. A 4 year bowl ban is crippling to a program like PSU. But do I think the NCAA has a right to levy sanctions that send a message to other programs that they must conduct themselves in a manner that a football program the magnitude of PSU should? ABSOLUTELY! As an OSU fan whose team is facing a ban from bowls and a significant scholarship reduction, I say they absolutely deserved it. Jim Tressel should be ashamed of himself and the players that created the mess deserved to be kicked off the team."


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

To which I responded:

"So let me ask you a few questions, sportsfather.

What if Curley and Schultz are found not guilty of perjury? (a felony with possible jail time)

What if Penn State is found not guilty of failure to report child abuse to the proper authorities? (a misdemeanor)

Obstruction of justice charges may yet be filed.

What if nobody associated with Penn State, other than Sandusky, is found guilty of any criminal charges?

What would you say about the NCAA sanctions then?"


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

To which sportsfather responded:

"That's a lot of if's. Regardless, if PSU were to appeal the sanctions at that point, it would look from a perception standpoint that they only care about keeping the football team competitive. Not to say that is true, but that's how it will be perceived. History has shown us that the NCAA tends to care as much about perception than it does hard facts. Like I said in the very first comment, at least with these sanctions in place, talking heads can't say PSU's football program got away with nothing but a slap on the wrist."


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

And also kbralwill responded:

"I had said in the initial post that I wrote that I was uneasy about the NCAA involving itself in this affair because of the fact that there has been to my knowledge no hint that any NCAA violations had occurred. But despite this uneasiness, I could finally see the NCAA's role in this mainly because of the reasoning that sportsfather has laid out. PSU is a member of the NCAA organization and it is clear to me at least that this membership requires more of the university than simply adhering to the NCAA rules and regulations regarding fair play.

This is why I was perfectly fine with the $60 million penalty assessed to the university and would have been okay if that amount was even greater. Even if the members of the administration go to trial and are found not guilty in this case, that is not a substitute in my mind for them being innocent of what they have been accused. I do think that their apparent negligence (at the very least) in this case is worthy of every bit of condemnation that they have received.

But the part of this ruling that has troubled me is the impact it has had on the innocent in this case. I do think that it is somewhat troubling that the football players and members of other PSU sports teams will be adversely affected by no fault of their own. In fact, if it were up to me, I would have been okay with leveling the $60 million fine, or something greater, stripping Paterno of the victories that he had amassed during the time frame, the reduction of scholarships, and the five-year probation period. I have been very much troubled with the four-year bowl/post-season ban because I think that this does unfairly punish the student-athletes who were innocent. Also, absolutely crippling the football program for a time will have unfortunate impacts on other sports, whose athletes were also innocent in this case.

But in the end, I think that some sort of response by the NCAA was necessary because it will send a message to other programs in the future that this cannot and will not be tolerated. I honestly think that the damage done to Penn State's reputation was probably sufficient to guarantee that the football program would suffer quite a bit even before the NCAA handed down its ruling. However, I'm not sure that this would have been the case if this scandal took place at LSU or USC, for example. I really believe that if this happened at LSU, USC, or a handful of other programs around the country and no NCAA sanction had been handed down, those football programs would have been virtually unaffected by this. Does anyone believe that a scandal such as this with no NCAA penalties would have in any measurable way affected USC's football program?

It's for this reason above that I agree that some sort of NCAA penalty was necessary. It was necessary for the future to ensure that teams that might only be marginally affected by the scandals themselves, will know that the NCAA can still assert authority over them. And the bottom line as far as I'm concerned, if this prevents any such scandal in any way related to any NCAA team from ever occurring again, then I support the NCAA's actions."


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

And then I posted:

sportsfather, I do not think PSU could or would appeal the sanctions. It would be up to the NCAA to react to not guilty verdicts in criminal trials by lessening sanctions of its own accord. Obviously it is too late to do anything about, for example, Silas Redd transferring to USC, Anthony Fera transferring to Texas, etc.

Some sanctions, however, such as the loss of scholarships, could be revoked.

Would the NCAA do that? A long shot. Maybe if the NCAA is made to look foolish enough and public pressure mounts to rectify the wrongs. This is provided, of course, there are no guilty verdicts, at least on felony charges.

Now sportsfather, you said, “History has shown us that the NCAA tends to care as much bout perception than it does hard facts.” Hey, I like that. Would you like to be personally punished for perception as opposed to hard facts?

You said in a previous post, “Then technically a player could be arrested for drug trafficing and still play football in your opinion because it didn't provide a ‘competitive advantage.’”

First, let’s use the word “convicted” instead of “arrested” please. Your Ohio State recently had a player, Bri’onte Dunn, who in the last week was charged with possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia after being pulled over by police for erratic driving. Should he have been kicked out of the Ohio State program solely on the basis of that?

The NCAA should typically have nothing to do with punishment of a player convicted of a felony drug charge, such as trafficking, or any other felony, and some more serious misdemeanors. You would hope the university would suspend the player and all scholarships and other financial aid would be withdrawn. So your ‘competitive advantage’ comment is not applicable to criminal behavior. It is applicable to rules violations such as improper recruiting.

I’m glad you mentioned Tattoo-Gate, another NCAA fiasco. Do you really want to go there? Why did the NCAA permit the five involved players including Terrelle Pryor to play in the Sugar Bowl? To stress the importance of education over the money from football? .


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

And then I posted:

kbralwill, I agree with you about the $60 million. I also would not object if it was more. I would have added the stipulation, however, that at least some of the money be allocated specifically to Sandusky victims. For example, the Sandusky victims should have monies immediately available for psychiatric counseling, etc., as opposed to waiting for the settlement of claims.

Now, you said, “Even if the members of the administration go to trial and are found not guilty in this case, that is not a substitute in my mind for them being innocent of what they have been accused. I do think that their apparent negligence (at the very least) in this case is worthy of every bit of condemnation that they have received.”

We need to separate negligence from criminal actions. Do you know that if while you are driving a car and you strike and kill a pedestrian you are in all probability going to be found to have been negligent? In other words, your insurance company is going to pay big bucks. You were driving and you killed a pedestrian. Negligence, prima facie.

The same reasoning applies to Penn State with respect to negligence. Child sexual abuse occurred on the premises of Penn State. Negligence, prima facie. That’s why Penn State will willingly pay millions of dollars to settle the claims of the victims.

Negligence, however, is a far cry from perjury and other felonies.

Please elaborate on what you said about USC and LSU. I am not sure I clearly understand what you are saying, and I do not want to make assumptions.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

And then kbrawill posted:

Blackandgoldjack, my point about USC and LSU is based on my belief that not all programs are equal. I think in the case of Penn State, and probably the vast majority of college football programs in America, the embarrassment of such a scandal would have been sufficient to (a) hamper the football team's ability to compete for a while and (b) ensure that administrative changes would be made to prevent such scandals from ever occurring again. In short, I think the short-term damage was already done to Penn State's football program without the need for the ban on bowls/post-season participation. I think that if the Penn State program is able to rally around each other with a few less scholarship athletes per year and qualify for the Big Ten Championship or a bowl game, then they should be permitted to play in those games because the players would have earned it and, let's not forget, were in no way guilty in this case. This is why I was in favor of a probation period and not the post-season ban.

As for the examples of USC and LSU, first I want to say that I don't mean to imply that either of these schools or any other school in America would not take every step to ensure such a scandal not take place again. What I mean to say is that if such a scandal had happened at one of those schools, I'm not convinced that in and of itself the scandal would have hampered the football team's ability to compete for any length of time. Essentially, I'm saying that I think Penn State's ability to recruit was already hampered by the scandal, whereas I'm pretty sure that recruits would have still had no problem flocking to big time powers like USC or SEC schools. Thus, I think the NCAA needed to set some sort of precedent that the football program or other sports program can still be hurt even if no rules violations have occurred if the actions of the school administration are deemed egregious enough.

Again, I don't want to intimate that this was an easy call for me, and I feel absolutely horrible about the innocents who will be affected, but if these actions by the NCAA have the effect of preventing something like this from ever occurring on a college campus again, then I accept them.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

And then sportsfather posted:

"And Brionte Dunn should be kicked off the team if convicted. Moreover, no player involved in Tattoo-gate (the reason for the sanctions) were charged with a single crime."

And I then posted:

"Bri'onte Dunn won't be convicted, sportsfather, not for a drug offense anyway. He said the drugs and pipe belonged to his mother. Right, mommy does the dope not me.

Of course, I was skeptical of this story at first, but it checks out.

First of all, the police should had him tested for drugs, what with the drugs and pipe in the car he was driving, and him driving erratically, which is why they stopped him in the first place. But they didn't for whatever reason. Ohio being a "per se" state, a traceable amount of THC in his blood or urine should result in a driving while under the influence of drugs charge.

Now, Ohio State did a really smart thing. They sent this guy to get drug tested. And he was clean. If he had been smoking dope the night he was driving and got stopped, the THC would have in all probability still been in his system.

I hope you see the point of this parable, sportsfather.

kbrawill, I'm going to have to mull over what you said before I step into that hornet's nest."


FreddyM profile image

FreddyM 4 years ago from Everywhere USA

You got it right B&GJack.I wouldnt be surprised at all if the sanctions are reduced once all the cards are on the table.The civil suits and criminal trials are going to change peoples minds.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Good news, Freddy.

A member of the Penn State board of trustees is filing an appeal with the NCAA. The Paterno family is also filing an appeal. The NCAA will likely deny these appeals. That will open the door to federal lawsuits.

The NCAA is walking on thin ice, and they don’t even know it.

My prediction is that the sanctions on Penn State are going to be substantially revised, to the benefit of Penn State. It may take time and many legal battles, but it is going to happen.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

I wonder how Penn State's football team will do this season.

Well, we know how the first game turned out. I just updated this hub with the results.

We have only seen the tip of the iceberg on this story.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Update September 8:

I just updated the hub with more repercussions. Another Penn State loss to be blamed directly on NCAA sanctions.

Which would be fine, except the NCAA will eventually be proven to have been wrong.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Update November 1:

Former Penn State President Graham Spanier has now been charged with criminal offenses like perjury and obstruction of justice.

These trials are going to be very interesting.

Also of some interest, I was listening to Mike & Mike this morning, and Greenie, hearing word of the charges questioned once again why current and future players are being punished for the misdeeds of others. Exactly. Not to mention that these misdeeds of others have been proven, other than those of Sandusky.

Stay tuned for the trials. I doubt there is going to be plea bargaining here.


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

Excellent commentary and I sure agree with what you had to say about NCAA sanctions. Good work!


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Thank you, avianvoice.

One more item of interest in this never ending story is that we have a new attorney general in Pennsylvania as of this past Tuesday's election. One who won't be a puppet of the current governor who was attorney general when much of this Sandusky business went down.

What that means, in my opinion, is that information will come to light concerning the governor himself being guilty of some of the same sort of things he has accused others of doing, and in fact made sure these others are being prosecuted for.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 4 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Update November 13, 2012:

For the first time, I have actually seen someone, other than Sandusky's lawyer and family other than that one son, say Sandusky was not guilty of the crimes for which he was sentence to prison.

And it is right here on HubPages in the hub "N.C.A.A. Was Wrong About Penn State" by Don Robbins and here's the link:

http://hubpages.com/politics/NCAA-Was-Wrong-About-...

I have been commenting on the hub. Incredible. Although I do agree with the title of the hub, but not what's in it.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 3 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Update February 11, 2013:

Yesterday the Paterno family released its own report, a review of the Freeh Report, calling it a "total failure" that is "full of fallacies."

Interesting, and a whole lot more to come.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 3 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

I update the hub today, February 22,013, with new information. Surprise, surprise, the NCAA proved itself to be totally incompetent.


Visitor 3 years ago

Can't decide if Don Robbins is:

A) Crazy

B) Mad Genius

C) Right.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 3 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Don Robbins appeared to have vanished. He and his conspiracy theories may be hanging out with Jimmy Hoffa somewhere.

I've read the grand jury testimony, the transcripts of Sandusky's trial, the Freeh Report, and everything else pertaining to this situation. I vote that Don Robbins is A) Crazy. He has no grip on reality.


BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image

BLACKANDGOLDJACK 3 years ago from Blitzburgh area Author

Update July 14, 2003:

Last week the former president of Penn State, Graham Spanier, initiiated a libel and defamation law suit against Louis Freeh.

Penn State is negotiating financial settlements with more than 30 individuals who have come forward with sexual abuse claims. Penn State will not release details until the deals have been completed.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working