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Public Opinion Survey

  1. Sustainable Sue profile image92
    Sustainable Sueposted 5 years ago

    If you had to take a public opinion survey on a topic you cared about, how would you reach people who have cell phones, but no landline?

    1. ib radmasters profile image61
      ib radmastersposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I would use postal mail, instead of phones to take surveys.
      I don't think it is safe to give out any information over the phones.

  2. ddsurfsca profile image68
    ddsurfscaposted 5 years ago

    I would buy lists of numbers, also there is software that traces good numbers.

    1. ib radmasters profile image61
      ib radmastersposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      start by telling us your number.

  3. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image94
    Marcy Goodfleischposted 5 years ago

    That's one of the problems facing marketing analysts these days - demographically, younger age groups are less likely to have landlines than older people.  Of course, much of the widely used research coming from universities was done through using 18-24 year old students as subjects.  So maybe things are balancing out now.  Just kidding.

    Other options are focus groups, mail surveys, filtering the landline responses to get balanced demographics, finding peope in public settings (malls, etc.) and surveying them, etc.

  4. Auto Faction profile image86
    Auto Factionposted 5 years ago

    Honestly, I think it makes more sense to post a survey online. I've never answered a phone survey, but when left to myself on a computer I answer them all the time (I'm 21 btw). I find myself a lot less pressured when answering surveys like this and the same method seemed useful when I did research in Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong. The only downside I can think of is that you can't target geographical areas like you could with an area code.

    1. Sustainable Sue profile image92
      Sustainable Sueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      What if it was sent to you via email? Would you respond to it?

      1. Auto Faction profile image86
        Auto Factionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, I think I would answer a survey if it came up in my inbox.

    2. Sustainable Sue profile image92
      Sustainable Sueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      What kind of response did you get in Sai Ying Pun?

  5. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image94
    Marcy Goodfleischposted 5 years ago

    My concern with online surveys (in terms of gathering usable results) is that they can be 'gamed' through people responding multiple times, or through campaigns to get likeminded people to respond.  Also, you can't control the demographics of the responders.  The data will not give you solid information usable across the spectrums of age groups, genders, income levels, education levels, ethnic groups or any other factors that need to be included in yielding data that can be interpreted for applications in the real world.

    1. Sustainable Sue profile image92
      Sustainable Sueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, and the demographics are an important tool for surveys to be truly representational.

  6. Dame Scribe profile image61
    Dame Scribeposted 5 years ago

    There's that QR thing you could use, though would come with a price tag I imagine. Sort of like a bar code thingy, people click and taken to your link done for cell phones. I would use survey sites, make a stand alone web page, there are sites that generate the codes for use in polls and surveys. Ask in forums. Just some ideas tongue

    1. Sustainable Sue profile image92
      Sustainable Sueposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Hmmm. I forgot about the survey sites. I have a couple friends who recently conducted a poll through one. Can you ask demographic information on them? Will they compare to make sure the same person doesn't answer twice? I'll have to check it out.

 
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