Engagement Rings: Don't Be Fooled By Flaws!

Lookin' good, but what's the "make"?
Lookin' good, but what's the "make"?

Diamond Engagement Rings: Don't Be Fooled by Flaws!

80% of engaged women in America receive diamond rings when they get engaged. And if you're going to be one of them, here's the truth you need to know!

The average engagement ring costs about $3500, and rings are considered to be the second-largest expense of a wedding. Therefore, it's important to be an educated consumer. 

Engaged couples, for the most part, concentrate on clarity, or how free the diamond is from flaws when considering the purchase of a diamond ring. Unfortunately, that may not be the most important factor to consider.

A diamond's best color? "Colorless" like a pool of clear, mountain spring water!
A diamond's best color? "Colorless" like a pool of clear, mountain spring water!

The "Make" and What It Means to YOU!

I forever hear brides who say, "I'm looking for a diamond with minimal flaws and great color." And that's fine provided the make is what it should be!

You could have a diamond that's minimally flawed with no color (like a pure, clean mountain stream, which is considered the best color), and yet if the make is bad, that diamond will look like a piece of paste.

The make is the cut, proportioning and finish of a diamond.

This is not where you want to be taken...
This is not where you want to be taken...

Don't Get Taken to the Cleaners!

Some jewelers estimate that by concentrating on color and flaws, you can pay 20%-40% more than you should because of the poor cut. Even Tiffany's in its How To Buy A Diamond brochure, says that cut is the most important factor to consider when buying a beautiful diamond.

That's why it's critical to know how your diamond stacks-up, make wise!


Diamonds of a carat or more? Get a grading report from the GIA!
Diamonds of a carat or more? Get a grading report from the GIA!

The Solution...

Every diamond of a carat or more should be accompanied by a report from a respected gemological laboratory like the GIA (Gemological Institute of America). Don't buy a diamond of this weight without one.

If your jeweler refuses, tell him that you'll pay for the report. It's worth the money!

CAUTION: A jeweler's appraisal of a diamond and a report from a gem lab are two different things. Jewelers do not have the technology or equipment (like a gem lab) to thoroughly analyze a diamond, both inside and out.

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