Behind the story, a deeper look at Jesus feeding the 5000 in John 6

Source

There aren’t many stories from the first three gospels that John repeats in his book. Here in chapter 6 we have both the recounting of Jesus feeding the five thousand and walking on water. With the other books already in circulation, John didn’t feel the need to include all the same details. In order to get a fuller picture of what was happening on that eventful day, it will be helpful to read the account from each of the other gospel writer’s point of view.

First, Matthew starts off with the tragic news that John the Baptist had been recently beheaded. After they bury the body, John’s disciples go to find Jesus. Not only was the Baptist a family member, but he had played an important role for Jesus and his ministry. Anyone who has lost someone close to them can understand Jesus’ desire to be alone with only his closest friends.

Matthew 14: 9 – 16 –“The king was distressed, but because of his oaths and his dinner guests, he ordered that her request be granted and had John beheaded in the prison… (John’s disciples came and took his body and buried it. Then they went and told Jesus. When Jesus heard what had happened, he withdrew by boat privately to a solitary place. Hearing of this, the crowds followed him on foot from the towns. When Jesus landed and saw a large crowd, he had compassion on them and healed their sick. As evening approached, the disciples came to him and said, “This is a remote place, and it’s already getting late. Send the crowds away, so they can go to the villages and buy themselves some food.” Jesus replied, “They do not need to go away. You give them something to eat.”

In Mark we learn that Jesus had sent the disciples out in pairs to teach the people to repent and heal the sick. He also gave them the ability to drive out demons. They are probably getting back to Jesus just after John’s disciples come with the news of the Baptist’s death. They are excited to report about their trips and haven’t had a chance to eat yet. Reading Mark, you get the feeling that there is a lot of commotion going on at that moment. It is understandable that Jesus would want to take them away to a quiet place. He wants to hear what they have to say, and he has some bad news for them.

Mark 6: 6 – 13 – “Then Jesus went around teaching from village to village. Calling the Twelve to him, he sent them out two by two and gave them authority over evil spirits. These were his instructions: “Take nothing for the journey except a staff-no bread, no bag, no money in your belts. Wear sandals but not an extra tunic. Whenever you enter a house, stay there until you leave that town. And if any place will not welcome you or listen to you, shake the dust off your feet when you leave, as a testimony against them.”

Mark 6: 30 – 44 – “The apostles gathered around Jesus and reported to him all they had done and taught. Then, because so many people were coming and going that they did not even get a chance to eat, he said to them, “Come with me by yourselves to a quiet place and get some rest.” So they went away by themselves in a boat to a solitary place. But many who saw them leaving recognized them and ran on foot from all the towns and got there ahead of them. When Jesus landed and saw a large crowd he had compassion on them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd. So he began teaching them many things. By this time it was late in the day, so his disciples came to him. “This is a remote place,” they said, “and it’s already very late. Send the people away so they can go to the surrounding countryside and villages and buy themselves something to eat.” But he answered, “You give them something to eat.”

Luke also tells us about the journey Jesus sent the twelve on, and the beheading of John the Baptist. With this information, we can have a new appreciation for the events leading up to the miracle of Jesus feeding the 5000. Suddenly the account in John becomes even more amazing. We can now understand that the disciples were hungry, exhausted from their journeys, emotionally overwhelmed, and possibly in shock over the news of John the Baptist’s death. They needed the peace and quiet and the alone time Jesus suggested. I can only imagine how disappointed they were when they saw the crowds. I think that Jesus was also looking forward to some down time so he could grieve his friend’s death. But when he saw the crowds waiting, he had compassion for them. He put aside his own desires to minister to them. This is a good lesson for us. How do we react when someone needs us and we just don’t think we have anything left to give? Do we get grumpy and disagreeable, like the disciples? Or do we offer kindness and compassion, like Jesus did?

More by this Author


Comments 56 comments

sallieannluvslife profile image

sallieannluvslife 3 years ago from Eastern Shore

One of my all-time favorite Bible lessons. Even wrote a hub on duplicating the loaves called "Sunday School Lesson Sourdough Loaves"! Great hub!


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Thank you Sallieann! My great aunt loved sourdough and also used them for her lessons.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

I can't find your sourdough hub on your site sallieann. Thought it would be fun to link it. Thank you for your kind words. Staying home with the boys is definitely the best thing I've ever done.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I would've followed in the footsteps of Jesus here. I've had people sometimes asking me for bus money and I always try to search for it. Sometimes though, I do not always have it.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

That is good to hear newengland.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I'm not entirely certain if I believe this story though. It's a beautiful story and there's probably some purpose about it. But feeding five thousand people with a few loaves of bread and some fish seems to me, unattainable.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

It is humanly impossible and to believe it requires acceptance that Jesus has power we don't have. An indication of his deity.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I'm not entirely certain that everything was possible for Jesus.

Mark 6:4-5 Jesus said to them, "A prophet is not without honor except in his hometown and among his own relatives and in his own household." And He could do no miracle there except that He laid His hands on a few sick people and healed them.

How exactly is it an indication of his deity even if he did perform miracles in light of Acts 2:22 and Acts 10:38?

I guess I am just simply doomed to be faithless.


Lizolivia profile image

Lizolivia 3 years ago from Central USA

What was the name of the town? The passage states they went to a quiet place by boat. There = a solitary and remote place. They were not in Jesus' hometown nor at his household. It does not mention any of his relatives being present.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

There are other things Jesus can't do, like lie, act outside the will of the Trinity, and change the heart/life of someone who isn't interested. I think Mark is indicating the condition of the hearts in the people not Jesus' ability.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Good Morning Lizolivia, Thank you for reading my hub! Do you mean the town where the disciples meet back up with Jesus? I think Newengland is referring to Jesus being in his hometown just before sending the apostles out on their missions trip.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I thought Trinity was God and Jesus was God so God = Trinity = Jesus? I'm so confused. One of many reasons I left Christianity. I was always a "heretic".


newenglandsun 3 years ago

"I think Mark is indicating the condition of the hearts in the people not Jesus' ability."

Incorrect. Note: "He could do no miracle there" (Key - he could do no MIRACLE there)

"other things Jesus can't do...change the heart/life of someone who isn't interested"

Romans 9. The god of the Bible has no trouble changing the heart of Pharaoh so that Pharaoh isn't interested. So can god change people's hearts or not? Or does he only like making it so that people cannot believe in him and unless he has touched people, they can still come to him?

I'm sorry, I'm getting angry again (as usual it seems).


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Yes Newengland, the trinity is God who reveals himself to us as three individuals; the father, the son and the spirit. All work together in perfect unity and no individual can act alone outside the will of the unit.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

With Pharaoh I believe that God hardened a heart that was already determined to be against him. His father had been cruel to the Jews and he continued that cruelty. God knew his heart wouldn’t change and he wouldn’t let the people go just because they asked.

Jesus knew the people’s hearts in his hometown and knew the miracles wouldn’t change them. Just like when I try to help my son with his homework. No matter how hard of a time he is having, sometimes he just doesn’t have a heart that will listen to me. Any suggestion from me only makes him more stubborn and frustrated. I am perfectly capable of helping him, but it is useless to try when he is like that. So I don’t bother. When he is ready to listen, I can help him.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

Oh. That's what it means when it talks about God hardening people's hearts. I was told by those calling themselves "Calvinists" that they believed in the absolute truth and that these verses in Romans 9 taught their doctrine of predestination.

I know what the Trinity is, but I am having a lot of difficulties finding this concept.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Although I haven’t studied or thought too much about predestination, I would probably agree that it is a teaching of the Bible. I tend to think of it as a result of God’s total knowledge. Remember, God knows our hearts, and he isn’t traveling along our timeline with us. Tomorrow isn’t a surprise for him. He is above and beyond time, it was his creation and he already knows everything that’s going to happen. He not only knows what we will choose to do and where the path of that choice will take us, but he also knows where each choice we have will lead us. His knowing doesn’t mean we don’t have a choice.

I know my kids pretty well and I usually know what choices they are going to make and can plan accordingly. Given the right set of circumstances and mood, I know that at least one of them is going too stubbornly refuse to make the best choice. You could say they are predestined to make life difficult. If the end goal is important enough, my plans will account for the stubbornness and the path to the final result will just be a little more complicated or difficult. Otherwise, they will simply miss out on the good things we plan for them. Just because I knew what they were going to do doesn’t mean that they didn’t have the choice. I would prefer that they choose wisely and I am sad that they will not have or do what they could have.

In a small way, this is how I see predestination. God knows our hearts and what we will choose to do ahead of time and uses them accordingly to accomplish his plans.

So if we have a habit of hardening our hearts, and God knows this isn't going to change then he will harden it when he needs it to be hardened to accomplish something he is doing.

I am currently working on a book on the Trinity, what it is, why we believe it, how it works and so forth. Maybe someday it will be published and you can let me know if it is helpful.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I don't get the whole predestination thing. If god already knows what I am going to do, what's the point trying to look for him?


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Good Morning Newengland,

Do you know why I usually have a pretty good idea of what my kids are going to do? It’s because I love them. I am interested in their lives. I have poured myself into them. I have watched them grow and become the wonderful boys that they are. I want them to come to me with their problems, their joys and their accomplishments. I want them to invite me to continue to be a part of their lives. I want them to ask for my help to solve their problems (and figure out their homework). It’s not always roses. Sometimes they get mad at me, scream at me, and disobey me just to make me mad. They don’t always want my help and I have to sit back and let them figure it out themselves, even if it would be so much easier for them if they would let me step in. But I still love them, deeply. I would give my life for them in a heartbeat, even when they hate me.

That’s how God feels about you Newengland. He loves you. He died for you. He’s interested in your life, who you are, what you do. He wants you to invite him to be a part of your life. He did what was necessary for you to have this relationship with him. Now he’s just waiting for you to accept it and believe him.

To believe him is to believe that he loves you; believe that you are sinful and that he died to pay the cost of that sin. You will want to turn away from your sin and turn to him as your Lord and master, letting him change you into the person he desires for you to be.

Sorry, enough preaching, I’m sure you know all that. It’s just that God loves you so much and I don’t think you can see it.

I see you commented on my other hub. I’m getting ready to leave so I am out of time and can’t go read it right now. Just don’t think I’m ignoring you…


newenglandsun 3 years ago

"That’s how God feels about you Newengland. He loves you. He died for you."

Habakkuk 1:12 - Are you not from of old, O Lord my God, my Holy One? You shall not die. O Lord, you have marked them for judgment; and you, O Rock, have established them for punishment.

1 Timothy 1:17 - To the King of the ages, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory forever and ever. Amen.

I can't accept this penal substitutionary atonement thing. Not even the Eastern Orthodox Church accepts that Jesus died to pay the price for our sins. Why would he even have to be "incarnated" in order to pay the death penalty for us? How could God have died when these two verses suggest otherwise? This was always a question about the Trinity that I always had dismissed. I have heard that the human nature died but the "God part" of Jesus did not. I have heard that the same thing that happensed to Jesus when he died is the same thing that happens to us when we die, hence, Jesus is immortal but died (death is death?), I have also heard "stop focusing on the differences between Jesus and God but pay attention to the similarities between the two otherwise, be a heretic!"


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Here it is...hi newengland. I thought I had missed a comment of yours somewhere just before my mom came. Sorry about that, it was a busy time. She is safely back to PA.

Yes, it would be hard to believe that God loves you enough to die for you if you don’t believe that Jesus is God. I think you read how busillis put it “and that the Son was fully the same being as God but a distinct person within the same being”. Perhaps that is a better description of what I’ve been trying to say.

There are many who don’t want to accept that Jesus died for their sins. But without the relationship with God that acceptance brings we are just left with religion. And religion by itself is everything you accuse it of being. And it is just as empty as everything else that people try to fill their lives with instead of a personal relationship with God. After all, who wants to admit they are a sinner. They don’t realize that being a sinner doesn’t take away our value or make us less lovable. It just makes us appreciate how much God loves us anyway, and the grace he extends to us.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

No, I am having trouble accepting the idea that God died for me because those verses I pointed out suggest he cannot die. Is this a wrong assumption?

Also, it is the very essence of penal substitutionary atonement which I find to be lacking and comes to making Christianity obsolete. The Eastern Orthodox Church does not deny Christ died for them, they deny he died instead of them which is what I was told my whole life up until now. Here is a link explaining more fully:

http://becomingorthodox.wordpress.com/2010/07/24/t...


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Hi Newengland,

What a gloomy cloudy day. We could see snow on the McDowell mountains earlier. Hope you had a good weekend. Sorry I didn’t get back to you sooner.

Jesus’ death did not mean that he ceased to exist. He is still eternal. He existed before he was born and he continues to exist forever.

That he died for you to pay the penalty of your sins is a key teaching of the Bible. But only you can decide if you believe the Bible or not.

The cause and effects of sin may make God angry at our sin and the pain it causes. But I don’t think the view of God as an angry God, who just can’t wait to punish us if we don’t do what the church says we must to earn his favor, is right. I think he is more like oxy clean, so pure and holy that sin can’t exist in his presence. Our sin separates us from him. Accepting Jesus’ sacrifice cleanses us so we can be in his presence and have a relationship with him.

Did you read my hub on God being like oxy clean?

http://hubpages.com/religion-philosophy/John-527-J...


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I know that the "Christian view of death" isn't that any one "ceases to exist". This would be a view consistent with strict materialism which even I have difficulties buying at times. I have heard this explained to me how Jesus didn't "cease to exist". I never said Jesus "ceased to exist" when he died. To clarify, God cannot die, Jesus died. ?????? If God cannot die and is immortal but Jesus died, how can Jesus be said to be exactly the same as God?

I don't gather that the Eastern Orthodox Church tells people that they have to follow what the church says to earn God's favor. I have had a discussion with an Eastern Orthodox Christian and he didn't come out as one arguing for works based salvation. Nevertheless, I think I do agree with them that it makes God an angry God to want to punish sins.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Good evening Newengland

Back to your question…"No, I am having trouble accepting the idea that God died for me because those verses I pointed out suggest he cannot die. Is this a wrong assumption?"

Yes, based on the verses you pointed out, it is a wrong assumption.

First, your quote on Habakkuk is wrong. In chapter one Habakkuk starts out complaining that God isn’t doing anything about the violence he is experiencing. God answers explaining what he is doing. Habakkuk’s answer in verse 12 after he hears what God is doing is “Are you not from everlasting, O LORD, my God, my Holy One? We will not die” not "You will not die", which you quoted me. It refers to Habakkuk and God's people.

As long as Jesus doesn’t cease to exist when he died, there is no contradiction with any claims of him being eternal or from everlasting.

The Greek word for immortal in 1Timothy is aphthartos which means undecaying or imperishable. Jesus did not see decay, so the verse is satisfied.

As far as the Eastern Orthodox view, I have no idea what they believe. I based my statement on what I gathered from the article you linked where it listed all the sacrifices they made. I may have read more into it than was there. It sounded nice logically if you don’t want to believe Jesus died for your sins, but I didn’t find it to be biblical.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

The article writer does believe Jesus died for our sins.

As far as Habakkuk 1:12:

Habakkuk 1:12 - Are you not from of old, O Lord my God, my Holy One? You shall not die. (NRSV)

Habakkuk 1:12 - LORD, are you not from everlasting? My God, my Holy One, you will never die. (TNIV)

Habakkuk 1:12 - Surely you, Yahweh, are from ancient times, my holy God, who never dies! (NJB)

Habakkuk 1:12 - Are you not from long ago, O Jehovah? O my God, my Holy One, you do not die. (NWT)

http://tnivtruth.blogspot.com/2007/05/habakkuk-112...

http://onlytruegod.org/defense/habakuk1.htm

Aphthartos used in 1 Tim. 1:17 means "incorruptible"

http://biblesuite.com/greek/862.htm

Athanasia in 1 Tim. 6:15-16 means "without death"

http://biblesuite.com/greek/110.htm


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Good Morning Newengland.

Can’t wait until tomorrow when it’s warmer in the morning. Brrr.

I’m impressed, I read 17 versions to be sure they agreed before posting yesterday and you used three I hadn’t thought of. ( I do have the NWT but I have a hard time accepting it as valid for the details since I discovered it replaces Adonai with Jehovah in the OT. Just seems a little too much like changing the text of the Bible to match their teaching)

I also thought incorruptible was the body not being corrupted in death or the same as not decaying.

Anyway, this is what I found on the alternate translation

“Note: According to the Masora, לא נמוּת stands as תקון סופרים, i.e., correctio scribarum for לא תמוּת, thou wilt not die. These tikkune sophrim, however, of which the Masora reckons eighteen, are not alterations of original readings proposed by the sophrim, but simply traditional definitions of what the sacred writers originally intended to write, though they afterwards avoided it or gave a different turn. Thus the prophet intended to write here: "Thou (God) wilt not die;" but in the consciousness that this was at variance with the divine decorum, he gave it this turn, "We shall not die." But this rabbinical conjecture rests upon the erroneous assumption that מקּדם is a predicate, and the thought of the question is this: "Thou art from of old, Thou Jehovah my God, my Holy One," according to which לא תמוּת would be an exegesis of מקּדם, which is evidently false. For further remarks on the tikkune sophrim, see Delitzsch's Commentary on Hab. l.c., and the Appendix. p. 206ff.)

However, since this is beyond my comfort zone as far as arguing it, I’ll answer as I would have originally before I actually read the verses yesterday and saw the difference. Which is that while Jesus is God, God is more than just Jesus. He is also made up of the Father and the Holy Spirit. Heaven wasn’t empty while Jesus died on the cross. And, as when we die, it is our bodies that die, not our inner being, the same was with Jesus. Even his body did not stay in the grave long enough to corrupt or decay. Anyway, I think you understand the rest of where I’m going with this and I have to leave before I’m late.

I hope you didn’t miss the whole point of the statement, which was to show you the extent that God loves you.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

The NWT does seem to promote JW doctrine a lot but I would not be able to state that it is a bad translation. I do not agree with the translation of "Jehovah" so many times in NT as they do but in the OT it is actually appropriate although probably not accurate.

As a student of Biblical Hebrew, I have learned that the only part of the divine name we know for certain how to pronounce is "Yah" (the first syllable). A more accurate pronunciation would be either Yahweh or Yahveh. The translations "Yahowah", "Jehovah" and "Yahovah" all come from the Masoretic tradition of placing the vowels from "Adonai" into the tetragrammaton to signify that the vocalization "Adonai" should be implemented. The German Biblical scholars made the error in thinking that this was the actual pronunciation instead of an indicator to pronounce "Adonai". They then "Germanized" the entire pronunciation and changed the "yod" to a "j" sound and hence, "Jehovah".

This is another example of a biased Bible translation:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyndale_Bible

William Tyndale also rejected this teaching of an immortal soul as well. As a person who was intent on coming up with a Bible translation, he had a lot of experience in understanding other areas of the Bible and its teachings. This is a blog I found that is apparently written by a self-proclaimed neuroscientist who has argued against some of this "inner being" stuff:

http://www.beretta-online.com/wordpress/2012/god-o...

I really have no clue as to what happens when people die seeing as I have never actually died. Again though, if it is saying that God cannot die, I have a lot of trouble accepting that God did die (no matter what portion of him died). I would think that to be co-equally God with the Father and the Spirit, that Jesus would also have their nature.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

Oh, yes. Two other Bibles that translate the tetragrammaton as "Jehovah" are the ASV and the YLT. I think the NWT gets more criticism for translating kyrios as "Jehovah" in the NT because there is not a single Bible I know of in existence other than the NWT that translates "kyrios" as "Jehovah".

I do prefer the divine name Bibles over the other kinds of Bibles mostly because I have always seen "Lord" as a title of status. I have used a Bible which has read "LORD" before but I get seriously confused when reading it because it is almost exactly like using a title as a name. I also have criticisms toward Eugene Peterson's "The Message" for translating some things as "Master God".

"Adon" is a title. "Adoni" means "my lord" or "my master". "Adonai" means "my lords" or "my lord" and is also seen as a substitute for "YHWH".


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

That is so cool that you know Hebrew. Do you ever ask God to show you what the truth is about all this?


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I know SOME Hebrew. I've never asked God to show me what the truth is about all this because I do not believe he exists. At least, not entirely certain.

There's still a lot of questions I have that really haven't been answered adequately enough for me to make an educated decision on the God issue.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Still, very cool.

You could start by asking him to show you if he's real. If he's not, it won't hurt anything.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

If I ask if he is real and if he is real but he doesn't respond...?


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Hmm, I don't know...

I think he will respond. You could remind him of his promises in Jeremiah 29:13 and James 1:5.

He has always answered me when I have asked for wisdom.

The other question would be, if he does respond, what would you do then?

I have to leave for my scout meeting.

Have a good evening Newengland.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I'd wonder if my mind was hearing things. How do I know it is actually "God" speaking?


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

For starters, it's important to know that anything he says will not go against what he has already said in the Bible. If you hear something that contradicts the Bible, its not from God.

Other than that, He talks to different people different ways at different times.

Just this morning I was talking to a friend who said her husband asked God to show him if he was real or not. He was walking across a car lot, when he was just suddenly filled with a knowing that God was real. He came home all excited and never doubted God existence again.

For her, she had to study and search the Bible looking for the truth, and God showed it to her within its pages.

Another friend didn’t think she had time to read the Bible. She has a very busy online job that keeps her glued to her email all day. She picked up her Bible while waiting on an email and told God she would read it for the minute or two until the file came through. Her computer was silent for 45 minutes while she read. As soon as she put her Bible down, emails came flooding through time stamped throughout the whole time her computer was silent.

Often He speaks through the Bible. Sometimes I will remember a particular Bible verse that applies to a situation I’m in, and I will know what God wants me to know. Other times I’ll be reading some verses and thinking about what they mean and I will think of a situation that I need to apply what I’m reading to.

Sometimes when God wants my sister to know something, she is surrounded by it. She’ll read something in the Bible, then hear it on the radio, from a friend, from the pulpit.

But for the most part, at least for me, His words are like a thought flashing through my mind. A still small voice that I have learned to recognize. Only once can I remember were his words so verbal that I had to turn around to see if someone was there.

There have also been times, the darkest times, when I have just been filled with an indescribable peace, and an assurance that everything was going to be ok, no matter what happened.

And still other times when I just feel a conviction about something.

God made you and he knows how to speak to you in the way you will hear him best.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

Isn't the Bible a terrestrial book? What if the Qur'an or the Bhagavad Gita is true?


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

The Bible's written by humans inspired by God.

I don't know what the Bhagavad Gita is, but I believe the Qur'an affirms the Bible is true.

hmmm I can't find the verse I'm looking for, but I found some others.

Mary (Maryam) 19:12, Middle Meccan in -7 AH.

God says, "`Oh Yahya! (John the Baptist) take hold of the Book with might': and We gave him wisdom as a child."

The Family of `Imran (Ali `Imran) 3:48, 2-3 AH.

The Angel Gabriel is speaking to Mary about Jesus before Jesus' birth and says: "And he (God) will teach him the book and wisdom and the Torah and the Gospel"

The Forbidding (Al-Tahrim) 66:12, 7 AH.

"and Mary (Jesus' mother)...believed in the words of her Lord and His Books"

The Family of `Imran (Ali `Imran) 3:49-50, 2-3 AH.

Jesus says, "I have come to you...attesting to (the truth of) what is between my hands of the Torah, and to make lawful to you a part of that which is forbidden to you."

The Battle Array (Al-Saff) 61:6, from 3 AH.

"And remember, Jesus, the son of Mary, said: `Oh Children of Israel! I am the apostle of God to you, confirming that which IS between my hands from the Torah...'"

The Table (Al-Ma'ida) 5:49, 10 AH.

"And in their footsteps (of Moses and the Jews) We sent Jesus the son of Mary, attesting to (the truth of) the Torah which was between his hands; and We gave him the Gospel - therein is guidance and light and attesting to (the truth of) the Torah which was between his hands: a guidance and an admonition to the righteous."

5:113.

"Then will God say, `O Jesus son of Mary! Recount my favor to you and to your mother when I strengthened you with the Holy Spirit, so that you spoke to the people in childhood and in maturity. Behold! I taught you the Book and Wisdom, the Torah and the Gospel...


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

it might have been this one...

"the promise of God IS true in the Torah and the Gospel and the Qur'an, and who is more faithful to his promise than God?"

-Repentance (Al-Tauba) 9:111, 9 AH


newenglandsun 3 years ago

They recognize the other Abrahamic religions (Christianity and Judaism) as "religions of the book" but the Qur'an does not affirm either book to be true. As such, that last verse (9:111) might suggest rather that the promise of God is to those who affirm the Torah and the Gospel.

Islam provided refuge for "heretical" groups of Christians of all sorts from the inquisitions. This covered a wide range of Christians. In turn, many persecuted individuals in Europe wished peace upon the Islamic empire.

Yes, Muslims affirm that Jesus is the Messiah and has a huge role in eschatology, however, they do not believe he is the Son of God by birth or by adoption nor do they believe that he was crucified, nor do they believe he was resurrected since they don't believe he died.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Interesting. If you asked God to show you if he was real, I'm sure he would chose a way to do it that you would understand. If you did though, you would have to tell me about it!


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I asked him...no response.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

I am sorry to hear that newengland. I still think you eventually will.

But I guess the promise in Isaiah is for those who are searching for God with all their heart. And while James promises that wisdom is offered to everyone, he does warn that if you will doubt, not to expect anything from God. So maybe you won't hear anything just now.

Thank you for not responding in anger to tsadjako and Funom Makama. I do think they are sincerely trying to help you and not condemn you.

today is field day for my youngest and he has begged me to come for the whole day and watch him. So that is where I will be. I am glad its supposed to be such a beautiful day. I hope you have a great weekend!


newenglandsun 3 years ago

So god doesn't fix our doubts? And how does he know whether I am seeking him with all my heart or not? Even if I was, I highly doubt he'd respond.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

our doubts maybe, but I think James is talking about our attitudes. Did you read those verses, what do you think? Anyway, God can change our attitudes too, but only if we really want him too. Otherwise, I think he leaves us alone.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I'm not sure if my attitude is really that bad.


Lizolivia profile image

Lizolivia 3 years ago from Central USA

He spoke to Paul while he was on the road to Damascus.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

I am glad to hear that Newengland!

Thank you Lizolivia! That is a great example, very helpful. Here was Paul, a man who believed in God and thought that God wanted him to kill the Christians. When God told him the truth he believed and repented. His life did a 180 and he obeyed God with radical courage and confidence in the truth. He didn't doubt what God told him.

If God showed you that he was real Newengland, do you think you would do the same, believe and obey God, or continue to question and doubt?


newenglandsun 3 years ago

How did Paul "know" it was God speaking to him?


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

I think I would have been pretty convinced


newenglandsun 3 years ago

If I knew for certain that it was God speaking to me, I would be convinced too. But I don't know for certain.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Do you think it would change your life?


newenglandsun 3 years ago

It probably would. Idk.


Lizolivia profile image

Lizolivia 3 years ago from Central USA

Although the devil can appear as an angel of light, as said in the scripture, he can not speak in through your spirit. God speaks in through and to your spirit and soul with a sense of fatherly love, the feeling of being surrounded by warmth and with true authority. This is why, in my opinion, people fall to the ground in the bible when the Lord approaches and also usually when he speaks to them. They are also filled with awe over his greatness. When it is the Lord speaking, there is no mistaking it.


April Reynolds profile image

April Reynolds 3 years ago from Arizona Author

Thank you lizolivia for your visit and your comments.. I'm sorry I didn"t get back to your comment right away.


newenglandsun 3 years ago

I don't believe in the Devil.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working