GEOCACHING: A Gateway to New Adventure On The Hiking Trail!

GPS Adventures in Exploring! Big Bear area, California

Castle Rock Trail, Big Bear, Ca.I took this photo while hiking upwards.
Castle Rock Trail, Big Bear, Ca.I took this photo while hiking upwards.
Castle Rock.
Castle Rock.
Near Fawnskin, California. Photo by Jon Siess.
Near Fawnskin, California. Photo by Jon Siess.
Doble area of Big Bear, California.(My own photo)
Doble area of Big Bear, California.(My own photo)
Baldwin Mine, Doble, California.I took this on a lovely geocaching day.
Baldwin Mine, Doble, California.I took this on a lovely geocaching day.
Looking at the Doble/Baldwin lake Area from the Baldwin Mine overlook.
Looking at the Doble/Baldwin lake Area from the Baldwin Mine overlook.
One of many wild sunflowers in the California Mountains. Please do not use my photos without permission.
One of many wild sunflowers in the California Mountains. Please do not use my photos without permission.
A  typical cache container-some can be quite small( micro).
A typical cache container-some can be quite small( micro).
This is what a GPS device looks like. See the elevation it has recorded?
This is what a GPS device looks like. See the elevation it has recorded?
A small Pioneer Graveyard from the 1800's in Doble, Big Bear California. Also the site of a fine hidden geocache.
A small Pioneer Graveyard from the 1800's in Doble, Big Bear California. Also the site of a fine hidden geocache.

GPS Technology and Hiking

If you want a new hobby for yourself and your entire family, try investing in a GPS, a global positioning System. You can link into Geocaching.com,, register and start to find "caches" of hidden treasures (usually small items and a log book) on remote hiking trails and in cities. A great book for beginners is GPS MADE EASY, by Lawrence Letham (Mounteers Books). The GPS device gets its co-ordinates from you and uses satellite signals from space. Every cache has its own special co-ordinates, logged into the geocaching.com site. (I have put out over 60 caches and really enjoy getting emails from the field).

You will discover hiking trails and areas that perhaps you would have never encountered otherwise. A good backpack and hiking shoes, a decent first aid kit, and you're ready to become a GPS pro.

This hobby has taken me and my partner all over Southern California, to remote lost mines and hidden gulches. You will need to purchase a GPS, preferably with an antennea as there can be "bounce" while getting signals. Once the GPS hones in on its cache, you open the box or container and sign the log book. Little trinkets, toys and such are exchanged, making it fun for the kids. (I confess I find that part fun also).

The photos are ones I have taken in Big Bear Area on Geo-cache outings. ENJOY!

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Comments 5 comments

Sally's Trove profile image

Sally's Trove 6 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

Thank you so much for leading me to this Hub. I'm not quite sure why you thought I'd be interested based on your comment on my winter whiteout Hub, but you were right. I've never heard of geocaching. What a stellar idea! I love the city aspect of it for my friends who are interested in abandoned urban and industrial sites. Fabulous pics, especially the one of the GPS device...is it being held together with rubber bands and bungee cords? No fake photo that. A true representation of a serious hiker. LOL. Super!


GarnetBird profile image

GarnetBird 6 years ago from Northern California Author

Yes, its from the actual field. If you look at the Southern pacific Rattler Hub, the GPS was there when Jon got a picture of the snake. It happened on the same day. Geocaching is great for getting kids away from the TV, I'm told--it does the same for me! Thank you for your kind comments.


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 6 years ago from Oakley, CA

Interesting. I am a rank beginner in this sport, and at age 62 with a bum knee, the type of trek in your article is beyond me. I'm limited to finding urban caches, with an eye out to 'muggles.'

But I had bought a TomTom specifically for getting into this sport, because it, (unlike the GPS built into our car), had the ability to enter a Lat/Long coordinate as a destination, rather than only a street address.


GarnetBird profile image

GarnetBird 6 years ago from Northern California Author

This Hub has been more or less ignored and I appreciate your comments! Urban caching can be fun, too!


Johnada2 6 years ago

Hey Guys! im new to hub pages and i think its absolutly great... why not give this MAD DAy out a try !! Zorbing in Glasgow

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