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Bearded Dragon Care

Updated on September 16, 2010
Whitney05 profile image

Whitney has raised and bred different species of geckos, snakes, lizards, tortoises and other exotics since 2003

Pogona vitticeps

Bearded dragons are originally from Australia. They are found mostly in arid, rocky, semi-desert regions, but they are, also, found in arid open woodlands.

Bearded dragons are good climbers, sometimes seen on branches, bushes, and fence posts, but they are mostly terrestrial reptiles.

They are diurnal lizards, spending most of the day basking on rocks and in open areas. During the night and during the hottest parts of the day, they can be found in underground burrows.

Bearded Dragons as Pets

Bearded dragons are one of the best known 'beginner reptiles.' In general, they rarely bite their owners. But, should never be left to the hands of children. An adult should always help supervise handling and caretaking of the animal.

When they become angry, bearded dragons tend to "blow" up. They will flatten out and their beard will darken. This creates an illusion of a larger animal. When you see your bearded dragon do this, that means you should probably leave it alone. But, for the most part, they are very docile reptiles.

When handling a bearded dragon, try not to frighten it because it will bite, but if you handle it every day, it will become comfortable in your presence. You should pick up a Bearded Dragon very carefully, gently scooping it up your with your hand under its belly and behind its front legs. Be sure to keep your hand open so that the Dragon can step onto you with its back feet. Dragons do not grip as well as other lizards, so you should support them but do not hold on too firmly.

Remember to never pick up a bearded dragon by the tail. Their tails are very delicate and Dragons do not regenerate their tails as other lizards do.

Bearded Dragon Behavior

Bearded Dragon Lifespan

With proper care and husbandry, bearded dragons can live an average of 5 to 15 years.

Bearded Dragon Size

Bearded dragons are medium sized reptiles. They can reach up to 2 feet long to include the length of the tail.

Females tend to range about 16 to 20 inches long, whereas males tend to be slightly larger.

Bearded Dragon Enclosure Size

When housing one bearded dragon, a 40-70 gallon tank is recommended because they do like to run and climb. The tank should be both long and high; the optimum size should be around 65" long and 16" wide.

You may be able to get away with a smaller enclosure, such as a 40 gallon breeder, which is 36" long, 18" wide, and 18" tall.

You can buy some tanks at low prices, or you can be creative and design one of your own by using glass and/or wood.

Do not place young bearded dragons in enclosures that are too large. They can become stressed and feel lost. It is best to house baby dragons in 10- 20 gallon aquariums, and upgrade as they grow.

Do not purchase the screen aquariums to house bearded dragons, as they do not allow the proper temperatures. The airflow with a screen enclosure minimizes the temperatures.

Bearded Dragon Cage

Bearded Dragon Set Up

Filling the Enclosure

Substrate:

The enclosure should have some sort of substrate. Where many people disagree with loose substrate, playsand, paper substrates, potting soil (without perlite), and alfalfa pellets, can be used, but not recommended. If you choice to go with a loose substrate, Never use cedar. Regardless the type of substrate that you choose to use, daily cleaning is necessary to provide a healthy environment.

For smaller and younger Dragons, paper towels or turf should be used because they will try to eat sand and small rocks, which could lead to a trip to the vet. As dragons become six months and older, their eating habits become better, meaning they do not eat as many small rocks when hunting. This is the perfect time to switch substrates from paper to a turf substance. When changing to a turf substrate, sand is a better choice because when the dragon goes to the bathroom, its mess can be cleaned using a kitty litter scooper, and then thrown away.

Personally, I disagree with loose substrates, ESPECIALLY, calcium-based sands. I recommend using paper towels, reptile carpet, or a tile base such as slate.

The reason behind not using loose substrates is that, they can cause impaction when injested. Impaction can result in death.

Décor:

Bearded dragons are best kept separately. However, for multiple bearded dragons, you must increase the size of the aquarium, so that there is a proper number of shelter places and basking spots.

For shelter, you should have rocks, wood/ branches, and possibly plants.

Also recommended for the bearded dragon's tank, are plants. Although many dragon keepers say that fake plants are dangerous to bearded dragons because they may eat it, both real and fake plants can be safe it just depends on your dragon. If live plants are placed in the tank make sure that the soil does not contain perlite (the small white balls) because Dragons like eating them, although it makes them sick. Snake plants, small palms, and jade, are a few recommended live plants. You must make sure that the plants won't be eaten or ripped up very fast, and that they will be able to survive in the temperatures inside the tank.

In the wild, bearded dragons love to climb, so as a pet, they must be given items to climb on, such as driftwood. Drift wood can be expensive if bought at pet stores, and it can be infested with different types of bugs and mites. If you get your drift wood from outside, make sure that you cleanse it with bleach and water, so that when it goes into the tank, it is bug-free.

You can try reptile hammocks, but because bearded dragons become a little heavy weighted, they can weight the hammock down until the suction cups fall from the walls.

Reptile Outdoor Enclosure

Lighting

The lighting in a bearded dragon enclosure should include an incandescent spot light and a full-spectrum light. The ultraviolet light is very important to a bearded dragon's life as it provides the vitamin D3, and if a bearded dragon does not receive enough of vitamin D3, he may die (along with the lights, put a vitamin supplement in their food).

Using UV-B and UV-A bulbs has a positive physiological effect on the animal. It can stimulate activities, such as the appetite, activity level, general health, and they may play a role in the reproductive behaviors. Theses bulbs are a little costly, and must be replaced once every six months. Just like heating bulbs, they should be set on timer, about 8-10 hours daily.

* Remember: full-spectrum tubes should not be placed too close where the beardy can touch the tube, but at the same time the UV from the tubes only reach about 6-8". Have a perch or log that is near the top, but too close where the beardy can reach up and get burned.

Proper UV lighting is essential! It can help to prevent metabollic bone disease.

Heating

The daytime temperature for a bearded dragon should be between 75ºand 85ºF, with a basking site of 110º to 120º. The nighttime temperature should be between 60º and 75ºF. It is very important to make sure that basking temperatures are correct, as well as the overall enclosure temperatures. Proper heating is necessary for digestion.

The overall humidity should stay the same at 35%.

To get the correct temperature, you should use an incandescent bulb or spotlight, but do not use a regular light bulb. The bulb should be placed in a reflector type fixture, make sure that the fixture can handle the heat. Make sure to place the light fixture above the basking spot, located at one end of the tank.

The bulb wattage should create a temperature of 90º to 105º F in the section that is closest to the light. In a 25 gallon tank use a 30-40 watt bulb; in a 55 gallon tank, use a 60 watt bulb; in a 75 gallon tank use a 100 watt bulb. These are estimated wattages. You should NEVER estimate the temperature.

To measure the temperature, buy a digital thermometer. Again, NEVER estimate the temperatures within the enclosure. Temperatures that are both too low or too high can cause health problems. Too low temperatures can hinder digestion, an increase the risk of impaction.

Be sure to place the light and heat bulb fixtures on the screen top far enough away from the bearded dragon so that it will not get burned.

DONOT used heat pads or heat rocks INSIDE the tank because they may burn the bearded dragon!

Pinkie Mice for Bearded Dragons

Bearded Dragon Diet

Baby and juvenile bearded dragons should receive more feeder insects versus fruits and vegetables, but you should always provide fresh produce in the enclosure every day. This will help familiarize the bearded dragon with them. Slice the fruits and vegetables as fine, or small, as you can, making sure that it is size appropriate to the baby bearded dragon. Provide as many other feeder insects to the youngster that it will eat within a 15-20 minute period. Try to do this at least twice a day.

Adult bearded dragons should receive more fruits and vegetables than feeder insects. You should always provide fruits and vegetables. You can provide feeder insects twice a week.

Because bearded dragons are omnivorous, meaning they eat insects as well as fruits and vegetables, it is important to provide the proper nutrition!

Feeding Baby Bearded Dragons

Feeding Bearded Dragons

Comments

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    • profile image

      fleetnbella 4 years ago

      I will be getting my beardie tomorrow. i sure cant wait. they are the sweetest reptiles. LOVE THEM...

    • profile image

      Sevi07 5 years ago

      I just got my own pet bearded dragon! I'm so exited! Pinch me I'm dreaming!

    • profile image

      stacey 5 years ago

      every time i go near the tank of my bearded dragon it rather puffs its face out or its spikes come out and makes its self look bigger..what does this mean?

    • profile image

      andy 5 years ago

      what humidity do i need in my zoo med my girl has just laid eggs had a mad rush round trying to get an incubator.

    • profile image

      Danielle 5 years ago

      I have 2 Female and 1 Male beaded dragons, but 1 female is a lot smaller that the other ones, The male has been bullying the female we put him in with so the 2 females are together they are different size but they get along very well, but now the Male is alone but every time you go to get him out or give him some food he stretches out and puffs his beard out, any thoughts to how I could stop this? Cheers

    • profile image

      tyler 5 years ago

      hi my name is tyler keppler love my dearded dargon name petey i love him i love to freeing him he is getting biginger as he is thank you so much

    • profile image

      czawadzski 5 years ago

      We just got a baby beardie he was sepetated from the others because he liked to bite their tails were thinking about getting him a slightly larger girlfriend but I'm afaraid he will try to eat her. The other day my bf put a large mouse n the cage with him (just to contain the mouse) while he fed the snakes and the beardie went after the mouse trying to eat it even though it was over 2x his size any suggestions? I know its not that he's hungry cuz he eats A lot he's gunna be a fat lizard

    • profile image

      rexiestar23 5 years ago

      my bearded dragon eats locust as well

    • cestmonvie profile image

      cestmonvie 6 years ago

      The video of the week old beardies is so cute, made in awe though at how much mine has grown! He was soooo tiny at one point and now he is sooo big... makes me feel like a proud parent.

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      If the male is not with a female, you don't have anything to worry about.

    • profile image

      soccergirl11 6 years ago

      my beardie is showing signs i dont know if he is ready to mate

    • profile image

      Tyler 6 years ago

      I am ready to give up. My dragon has become very aggressive. I have done everything I was told to do and that the books said. It won't even let me touch or hand feed him/her. It will bite anything that goes into the tank. HELP!

    • profile image

      Julia 6 years ago

      @ Brandy take him to the vet immediately, a health check up will cost you between $40 and $60. it is totally worth it

    • profile image

      Brandy 6 years ago

      I have a bearded dragon about 8 months old. It has stopped eating. He will not move is front right leg and when he tries to walk falls over to his back. He will not try to turn back over. I need some suggestions on what to do? There isn't a vet in our area that deals with bearded dragons.

    • profile image

      danvoelker 6 years ago

      I used to have a bearded dragon. He lived for around 14 years. Good article.

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      I have an article on plants safe for turtles and tortoises. For the most part, they will be fine for a BD.

      https://hubpages.com/animals/Edible-Plants-for-Tor...

    • profile image

      Tyler 6 years ago

      I'm more just wondering if you have a list of plants that they can eat and that can survive in the same dry hot environment. I am going to start my outdoor terrarium this summer so sizes are not a big deal. Thanks for your help.

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      Hm.... Flowering, I'm not sure, as most safe and edible flowering plants get large. I'd have to ask around on that one.

    • profile image

      Tyler 6 years ago

      Thanks. Now back to the live plant thing. A vine or ground cover would be great. My wife would like a flowering plant. What plants are best for in an indoor enclosure?

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      Playing with the BD often upon first arrival more than likely stressed him out beyond belief. You should always leave them alone for at least a week, feeding and watering only. This gives the animal time to adjust to new surroundings and environment.

      Try different foods to see what the BD likes. Offer fruits and veggies throughout the day, replacing with enw the next morning. Remove crickets and insects after 20 minutes or so.

      Slow introductions between you and the BD at first. Try hand feeding to gain trust between you and the animal.

    • profile image

      Tyler 6 years ago

      Anything that will make it that he can eat.

      Also he is very aggressive and defensive since we first got him. I try to play with him often but he is always on the defense. What are some good methods to calm

      Him down.

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      What type orf plant are you looking for? Flowering, green, bush, ivy?

    • profile image

      Tyler 6 years ago

      I would like to put a live plant in the cage for my bd. What is the best plant? One they can eat and can survive in this habitat.

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      You don't have to feed pinkies. It's actually not the best idea, as they are fatty.

      You can name it whatever you want to.

      I recommend tile, carpet, etc. Fine grained sand is ok for adults, but be careful of impaction.

    • profile image

      Kamalamala! 6 years ago

      Is it really neccessary to feed bd pinkies? And what should I name my bd? What sort of substrate should I use!?!

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      I would opt for the Spring Mix. It is a mixed bag of lettuces that is a great staple.

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      lisa 6 years ago

      its a leaf thing lol....u can buy it in asda in the salad section also comes in mixed bags but he doesnt like the watercress xx

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      What is rocket?

    • profile image

      lisa 6 years ago

      Thanx i tried rocket and broccoli he is eating the rocket but leaving the broccoli....at least he is eating sumthing.....thanx again xx

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      Try other foods. Try a wide variety.

    • profile image

      lisa 6 years ago

      Hi!!!! my sons bd wont eat his fruit and veg..wot can i do? xx

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      I wouldn't, as it can emit oils that can irritate the respiratory system.

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      Bernie 6 years ago

      I have an old cedar log and was drift wood..a very nice looking piece of wood that would look great in the desert setting I have for my BD...I see that you shold not use cedar as a substrait..can I use this cedar drift wood for him as a climbing and basking branch?

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      The BD probably hasn't shed those areas yet. Try a lukewarm soak

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      Leslie Kowalski 6 years ago

      Hi again - your answers have been so valuable - thank you! I have another concern about our dragon. When we got her (about 3-4 weeks ago) her skin was bright and yellow. In the last week her back looks like "matte finish", almost like she has been dusted with powder. The skin on her legs did shed the first week that we got her, so I'm wondering if her back is going to shed, or if it could be for another reason? Only her back looks like this - her head, tail, and legs look the same as when we got her.

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      The tubes only last 4-6 months. They will still light up, but the UV will start to run out. You just have to properly dispose of them after 4-6 months and buy a new one. I prefer the bulbs, as they last much longer.

      The only guarantee to check the UV output is to purchase a solar reader, which can be costly.

      The bulbs last a few years, but the tubes a few months. Yes, they're more costly, but they last longer. I use the powersun bulbs with my tortoises, and the only problem that I have had is a defective bulb that would shut off randomly, but the rest have been great. When they are shut off, and turned back on right away they won't turn on immediately beauase they have to cool off first.

      Make sure that you DO add veggies and greens to the diet plus the worms.

    • profile image

      Leslie Kowalski 6 years ago

      Thank you so much for your answers! Our UVA bulb is definitely warm enough for our dragon, but I'm wondering if I should get a 2nd fixture for a UVB bulb too. It looks like I have 2 choices. One is to get the PowerSun bulb that you mentioned ($45 - yikes!), or to get a 2nd fixture with a UVB fluorescent tube (which would probably run us the same amount of money for the fixture and bulb). The PowerSun bulb is getting very mixed reviews on Amazon, so I'm leaning toward the tube. I'm also thinking that the tube will last longer overall (fluorescents always seem to last longer than incandescents). What do you think?

      I'm glad that feeding just mealworms is good enough for our lizard. They seem much easier to handle than the crickets. Is there any important reason I should be considering feeding crickets as well?

      Thanks again!

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      1. I can't say whether or not that watt is enough, as I don't know what your temps are. You have to base the watt on the temperatures in the tank- basking temps and overall temps. As for UVA/UVB. They need both. They powersun bulbs are great for UV, as they provide a little heat and the UV, whereas most others don't.

      2. Crickets and mealworms are both great feeders. They need to be fed live.

    • profile image

      Leslie Kowalski 6 years ago

      We just got an ~ 1 year old dragon and a I have a few questions.

      (1) I purchased the Zoo med double lamp and have a 100 W UVA basking bulb on one side and a 70W blue (night) bulb on the other. Is this good enough? Now I'm wondering if I should have gotten a UVB lamp. Looking around, I don't think the UVB lamps will fit in the fixture that I purchased.

      (2) Do you think crickets and mealworms are interchangeable, as far as nutrition, for the dragons? Mealworms seem to be much easier to keep so I'm wondering if I need to get both. Also, is it important to feed live mealworms to the dragon?

      Thanks!

    • profile image

      Nicky  6 years ago

      How old does your BD need to be before you take it outside or take it on a leash :) xx

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      1. No.

      2. When they want to. There's no time that is going to be the same for every BD.

      3. When he goes to sleep.

      4. Could be any reason to include dominance, warning sign, etc.

    • profile image

      Nicky 6 years ago

      hey i was just wanting to ask some questions.

      1-do BD make any noises when they sleep

      2-what time do they wake up and fall asleep

      3-how do u know when your BD is tired

      4-what makes them puff there beard

      be great if could answer GREAT HUB ! :D

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      Nicolle, I would say 6-8 weeks, as it allows the breeder enough time to ensure that the BD is eating properly.

      Fran, Try crickets instead of locusts. What substrate are you using? What are the temperatures?

    • profile image

      fran 6 years ago

      my bd keeps hiding and only seems to go toilet if i give it a bath it has fresh veg and a couple of locust a day

      i would like to know if some thing is wrong

    • profile image

      nicolle 6 years ago

      how old does ur BD need to be before u take it home ? xx

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      Check your temperatures to ensure they're warm enough. BD's are diurnal, which means they are awake during the day and sleep at night. They generally bask during the day, and will rest at night. I'm not sure which resource you found that said they hide during the day, but it would be the one and only that was 100% incorrect. All resources and books that I've ever read say otherwise.

      They generally don't go a couple of months without eating. They eat daily. They need fruits and vegetables daily, starting at day one. The difference is that when growing, they do need more proteins as provided by crickets. The veggies should still be offered. A BD that has never seen a piece of romaine as a baby or juvie will generally not be fond of it when it's older. I don't know how many times I've gotten asked why their adult won't make the switch to veggies. Plus, when you feed tons of crickets a day, they just get full on crickets and don't want the veggies. You have to monitor the appetite and learn how to gauge it, especially as the BD ages.

      Definitely find better resources, as what you're pulling from is giving you bad information.

    • profile image

      Joe 6 years ago

      Ive had my bearded dragon for about two months and the previous owner had it for a month and its a baby, they only gave the BD crickets because its a baby ans they said they dont really eat veggies at a baby and i still give it the option for veggies but recently all my BD is doing is sitting on the log basking in the heat lamp and uvb lamp all day it moves up and down the log a little to get closer and further from the light and i try to feed him twice a day crickets too but i keep those in a different tank that i put him in and he hasnt been eating much maybe 1-2 crickets every other day. right now im confused cuz i read that they usually go hide and sleep all day if they dont feel good but my BD isnt hiding, also i read that BD can go for a couple months eating barely anything sometimes. Do you think i should be concerned?

    • profile image

      Nicolle 6 years ago

      Ok thank u so much this is great that if anyone is stuck we have someone to ask :)

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      They can, but if you're planning on putting a baby outside, you need to ensure that no birds or other predators will be able to get it. Even adults need to be confined when outside, especially if you're not going to sit out there with them.

      A few hours a week would be plenty, of course with the UV bulb for the indoor enclosure.

      I have seen some people have full outdoor enclosures for adults, but that really varies per climate.

    • profile image

      Nicolle 6 years ago

      Thank u that makes much more sense and its a baby BD im getting :) Also was wondering can they go outside and if they can how long are they allowed outside for ?? This is such a great website ! :)

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      No, that is not true. You don't want to get into hand-feeding as if the BD gets used to hand feeding, you'll find it hard to get it to eat from a bowl. They typically like anything bright, not just raspberries. You want to keep the diet very varied with plenty of different fruits and vegetables. But, getting a younger BD, you also want to make sure that it gets appropriately sized crickets daily. Just don't overfeed because you want to ensure that there's still some room for the veggies.

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      Nicolle 6 years ago

      Hey,My mum just went and bout me my 1st bearded dragon couple of days ago but as soon as she pays it up , i will get it home, im a bit confused on what time i am meant to feed it and what to do really , i have done alot of research but nothing much on times to feed at etc,just wondering if u could help me.Im a bit nervous getting her/him,, its going to be a baby one so im hoping it will be ok with me ,, i was also wondering is it true if you hand feed them raspberries you get a closer bond because apparently they love them ?

    • profile image

      emzzy 6 years ago

      thank you for you advice glad to know i will get them out now

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      Crickes can cause damage to a reptile when left in the tank. Crickets have been known to bit reptiles.

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      emzzy 6 years ago

      hi i was just reading your coments and u seem to know wat u are talking about.i have a bd who i love hes great but i have read on the internet that you shouldnt leave crickets in the tank could you tell me why and if it causes any harm to my baby????? plus he loves to eat them from the tub and when some get out into hes tank he does eat them but leaves a few and there hard to catch so would really like your opinion many thanks

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 6 years ago from Georgia

      If it's a tube, they should be replaced well before they go out. The UV tubes need to be replaced every 4-6 months whether they are giving off light or not, as they stop producing optimal UV after 4 months. So if it's a tube UV light, the BD hasn't been getting UV for some time, and you want to get a replacement asap.

      If the bulbs, they don't have to be replaced as often, so it may not be quite as big of a deal because they last a good bit longer, but you still want to get the replacement soon.

    • profile image

      Lee 6 years ago

      My gf has left me her bd whilst she is on holiday, and his uv bulb has gone I won't be able to get a new one for a few days is this ok?

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      Boo.x 7 years ago

      Hi Whitney, my beardie Ronaldo, originally had sand as substrate recommended by shop,I changed this later to wood chips, about a week ago I changed it to paper towels. The basking spot is 110 and the cool area is 75, I have another beardie in with him who is smaller and doing ok.Ronaldo would eat about 20 crix a time 3 times a day.He wont eat veg, and is about 9wk old, never had a problem with him eating.He finished shedding as well bout a week ago (little bit on his tail)thats when he went like this.

    • profile image

      panno 7 years ago

      i have a male beardy drangon and he willnt eat vegs i put fresh stuff in each morning but still nothing ??

      what can i do ??

      thx

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      You want to offer very small crickets. Just a few. The BD was WAY too young to have been sold. It is a near hatchling size BD, and not safe to be away from the breeder until he has determined it is eating fine and is safe. Most breeders do not sell their BDs until at least 6 weeks. I am assuming you did not go to a breeder, but a pet store, where the BD came from a wholesaler. Be very careful of the health of the animal, as it didn't have a good start, and the start of life is most important.

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      britt 7 years ago

      I just bought my first Bd and he/she is tiny!!! pushing 4 inches...how many crickets should it be eating?

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      About once or twice a week.

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      maly 7 years ago

      how many times a week do give your bd live food and how many he's about a year and half

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      I would just watch carefully.

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      Rob Angus 7 years ago

      ive just bought a plastic cactus for decor and when i came back a bit later it was eating the plastic spines so ive removed it will the plastic be harmfull to my beardy

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      Make sure that you house all of them separate, especially since you have different ages and different genders. You don't want the females to breed before they're ready, and the male will breed no matter what.

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      Maly 7 years ago

      We bought 5 BD 2 females and 1 male in 1 tank, and a female and a male in an other, everthing is fine exsept the 2 younger ones witch are about 12 inches from head to tail, 1 is really fat compared to the other and I'm not sure witch one is male and female, they seem to be craping and peeing ok because I clean any mess out and there both eating as much as each other, is it ok?

      p. s. it is livley and alert

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      All you can do is wait it out. Being out just a few days, shouldn't have caused her to become thin. Maybe you should readjust your feeding schedule and how much you're offering.

      I would be quite cautious as frogs can contain a toxin on their skin, so you'll want to be very careful. Also consider cage clips if the BD keeps getting out.

    • profile image

      Ursula 7 years ago

      Okay, thank you so much!

      And, yes... sadly, my beardie is thin. She got out last friday and I just found her with the toads in the basement. She's a crafty critter... but she can't seem to pick out the roaming spiders and centipedes unless they are close and moving . I think the toads were more enticing than the small spiders... and the toads have a warm cage, similar to Angies (my BD) :)

      Again, thank you so much for your help! I am glad I have someone who knows what they are talking about to ask :)

    • Whitney05 profile image
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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      Are you sure that the toads weren't eaten by other toads? That is common when housing multiple frogs/toads in the same enclosure.

      If they are in the BD, the decomposing bodies would be hard to feel unless the BD is thin. There's not much you can do except wait it out. If you are worried a vet may be able to pump the stomach, but I've never heard of that in a reptile. It may be possible though. Keep the temperatures up and keep up daily lukewarm soaks.

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      Ursula 7 years ago

      My bearded dragon got into my sisters toads(it's baby season, tiny toads are actually quite adorable. We counted the babies and two seem to be missing. I can feel the two small mummified-toad lumps in my beardies stomach/intestinal tract. She has been keeping her eyes half-closed, her beard dark,she hasn't been able to go to the bathroom and has been a rather depressed lizard since she ate them. Is there anything I can do? (P.S. I already gave her two warm baths to see if that would help) Thanks!

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      Not all are going to be the same. You will find some eat better than others, some are more active, etc. Just keep an eye on those who have less of an appetite and those who are less active. You may have to create separate enclosures for those.

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      rachel 7 years ago

      i have some babies that are hatching as i type, my question is... are some more lethargic then others? or is that a cause for concern?

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      UV lighting is a must!! You have to have it. If you buy the UV tubs, they must be replaced every 5-6 months because the UV runs out even thought it'll still create light. The tubes are cheaper, but they don't last as long , and in the long run end up being more expensive than the uv bulbs. The power sun bulbs are more expensive, but they last so much longer than the tubes. You have to have one or the other.

      Socialize slowly. Babies aren't as social sometimes. Remember you're big and it's little. It can take time.

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      jdawn 7 years ago

      hey i did not read all that was above so you may have already answered this.. if so i am sorry. first off, is it essential that a bearded dragon have uvb light? if so is there anything cheaper that what is at the pet store or am i just going to have to suck it up and buy one? and second my bearded dragon which i have only had a few weeks and is a baby is eating well and everything but doesnt seem to like to be handled very much is there anything i can do to change this? or reasons why he may be squirmy like hes trying to get away?

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      I have not heard of that.

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      maly stanley 7 years ago

      Hi when I bought my bearded dragons off my girlfriends mate he said he was not feeding them black crickets because they were poisoning them and the bd were dieing.I had gecko's and chamlons and they have never been afected, have you ever heard of this?

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      I don't believe I've ever seen them or heard anything about them. Sorry.

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      ste carey 7 years ago

      thanks for the amazing info, one thing i see people using instead of sand is beach chippings i was wondering what you thought about this, they seem to be fairly large so that the BD wont eat them, but also small enough too clean.

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      If they are freeze dried or dead, the BD will more than likely not eat them. Live mealworms are fine to give as treats or even as a staple diet for older BD's. The stomach acid will kill the mealworm if the BD chewing doesn't.

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      malcolm stanley 7 years ago

      I was shopping in b+m bargins and they had some meal worm you feed the birds, would it be ok if i give my beardeds a treat with some. I have heard that if you give them live ones and they don't chew them they can come out of there poo alive

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      Angel 7 years ago

      Hi. I have two beardies one male and one female. I was wondering if you could tell me where i can look for assistance with finding them homes. I cannot keep them anymore and want to give them a good home. I am in VA state. I contacted the reptile rescue through their email but no response.

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      Definitely try to move the tanks. And separate them, as you'll probably see bullying from the more active one to the other one.

      It is good that you found him.

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      Belinda 7 years ago

      Hi Whitney,

      After reading all the info on where BD's tend to hide, I decided to crawl on hands and knees throughout the house and garden, if need be, but find I will find him!!

      Just before leaving work yesterday my son phoned me and told me he found the escapee under his bed curled up in the corner. It never even occurred to me that the BD will go into the house rather than out the window.

      I have learned my lesson and have moved the terrarium away from the window and after reading your answer I will go and buy another terrarium for the other one later today.

      Your comments/answers on questions from all your fans have assisted me greatly the past few days – THANK YOU !!!

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      Look for warm places; because they do bask during the day, you could try looking for brightly lit places, where the BD may try to bask.

      If you opt to get another BD, try housing in a different enclosure. Not the same one, especially since one is very docile.

      Also, move the tank AWAY from the open window. Placing the tank in direct sunlight and even on an exterior wall, will increase the temperatures more than you need.

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      Belinda 7 years ago

      Hi Whitney, I bought each of my children a Beardy for their birthdays, which are 5 days apart from one another. From the start one of the Beardys was more energetic and active than the other and seemed to want to run all over the place. One of my children left the terrarium’s door slightly open when she went to get fresh food for them. When she returned there was only 1 Beardy in the terrarium. Now the problem is that the tank was next to an open window and I suspect that it escaped through the window.

      I also have 3 chow-chow’s who tend to hunt the common lizards, and I fully expected the Beardy to be caught and killed within hours. It has been 4 day’s already and I have not been able to locate the live Beardy or its body. It is quite cold at night and I have wondered if may die from the cold.

      If it is still alive, what can I do to get it back?

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      I would offer vegetables daily, and mealworms every other day. It is very important that the BD gets his fruits and veggies. You can offer a bath once a week, and he should be fine. In a lot of cases, people will just spray the veggies a little bit and offer veggies that are rich in moisture. Some can get them to drink from a bowl.

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      hannah 7 years ago

      is it ok if i feed my lizard about 10 meal worms a day, and veggies with calcium on them everyother day? also, how many tims a week should i give my lizard a bath?

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      I just drop them in.

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      Leigh 7 years ago

      Hi, this is going to sound like a stupid question, but when you feed crickets to your BD do you let them free roam in the viv or use feeding tongs as some people suggest.

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      CC, You can take finger nail clippers and carefully cut the tip off. If you can see the quick within the nail you can go to that point, but otherwise just trim a little bit so that you don't cut the vein.

      Jaguar, mealworms aren't necessarily fatty foods. You don't want to force weight on the BD, but just ensure that the BD is eating. They don't all grow at the same pace. As long as your BD is eating its insects and veggies, you should be fine. You can call a regular vet and ask if you bring in a fecal sample, whether or not they can perform a test to check for parasites. If they'll do it, bag up a some poo and take it down there. That will help clear your mind about whether the BD has worms or parasites, which is a common cause for weight loss and lack of appetite.

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      Jaguar 7 years ago

      I was looking at some photos of bearded dragons today and I got a bit worried...

      My bearded dragon is skinny and has lost weight since I bought her. I think something is wrong she doesn't eat as much as everyone elses that I've seen and when she turns around or twists her skin ripples because it's loose/she has lost weight.

      I'm a bit worried and there is no reptile vet anywhere near me I found out. Should I start feeding her fatty foods such as mealworms to get her to put some weight on? Thanks

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      CC 7 years ago

      We just got this bearded dragon. He has long claw. Can I clip his claw? Does anyone know how much to clip?

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      Consider using a ceramic heat bulb in addition to the UV bulb. Start with a small watt because you don't have that far to go. Like I said, you want the basking area to be around 110 or so. I'd start with a 45 watt bulb; you should be able to return in or exchange it if it's not getting hot enough or is getting too hot.

      The average tank temperature is fine with what you have, but where ever the BD is basking, whether it be a log, ledge, second level type deal, etc. you'll want the temps a little hotter.

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      jaguar 7 years ago

      Wow realy? well its a 150 watt basking bulb and thats as hot as it gets at the basking spot how do i get it higher? i use a mini light to give it a boost in heat in the morning as it is cold now.

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      I would get the basking spot up. That's actually a little low. The main tank can be around those temps, but you want the basking spot to be much higher.

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      Jaguar 7 years ago

      Ok thanks it's a good thermometer with a probe. She hasn't done it since I told you thanks anyways.

      By the way the temp on the basking spot varies from 80-90 degrees depending how hot or cold the day is

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      Generally, gaping mouth can be a sign of overheating. Could be fear. It's hard to tell. There's nothing really to worry about.

      Make sure that you are measuring your temps with a good thermometer and not a stick on one.

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      jaguar 7 years ago

      hi thanks to you my bearded dragon seems happy. she eats her crickets and basks,and has just shed her skin after i gave her a bath.

      but.... i noticed somethig the other day...

      i went into my room as usual and found her looking out of the glass. As i was cleaning my room she jumped up on her basking spot then opened her mouth. She has done this twice in 1 week.

      is this normal?whats wrong?how can i stop this?

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      Whitney 7 years ago from Georgia

      If the nails get too long, you can trim them, but regularly, no you shouldn't have to trim them with the rocks and wood, as that should wear them down some. The sand won't do anything for the nails.

      I trimmed my BD's nails once or twice a year.