ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Kauai Karma - Roosters' Revenge

Updated on January 5, 2015
Sentry the rooster guards Lihue's Budget Rent- A- Car building.
Sentry the rooster guards Lihue's Budget Rent- A- Car building. | Source

Fresh off the airplane, I met my first Kauaʻi rooster at Līhuʻe's Budget Rent -A -Car. Our driver was negotiating prices at the counter when a flamboyantly feathered fowl strutted across the parking lot. Silky black tail feathers swaying, he cock-a-doodled his aloha intermittently to shuttle bus arrivals.

"That's Sentry," said Budget agent Penne, when she saw me snapping pics. "Every morning he parades himself in front of our doors."

With affection, she goes on to tell me how she shoos this clamoring cockerel off, only for him to return again and again throughout the day.

This hen was one of many chickens who visited us on our lanai.
This hen was one of many chickens who visited us on our lanai. | Source

Chickens Everywhere

At a green light in Hanalei we remained stopped as a hen trailed by chicks paraded across the road. Looking out the window, as we made our way north toward Princeville, I noticed occasional chickens on the side of the road. We stopped to buy groceries and a rooster sprinted through the parking lot as we loaded our bags. At our Princeville timeshare, we were visited daily by roosters and hens, possibly because we ignored the sign asking us NOT to feed them.

Hurricane Iniki

No one has yet counted the ratio of chickens to people: I saw chickens everywhere I went. Locals say the whole thing started when Hurricane Iniki hit the island in 1992. Iniki caused millions of dollars of damage to homes, hotels and tourist attractions. Fighting cocks got loose when their crates were broken open by the storm. They proliferated in the wild by connecting with homeless rural hens.

No Mongoose on Kauaʻi?

72 Jamaican mongoose were brought to the Big Island in 1883 to get rid of the rats. This was the brainstorm of some poor soul who did not realize that rats are night creatures and mongoose are day creatures. The rat population was unaffected and the egg loving mongoose contributed to the extinction of Hawaii's ground nesting birds on all but two of Hawaii's isles. How did Kauaʻi avoid the mongoose? Offspring of the jamaican mongoose were later released on Maui, Molokaʻi and Oʻahu. Kauaʻiwas spared when an angry dock worker, bitten by a caged mongoose bound for the Garden Island, kicked the cage into the ocean. There are occasional rumors of Mongoose on Kauaʻi. In February of 2004 a credible witness saw one and traps were set in an effort to catch it.

Wild Cock Fight in Kauaʻi

Cockfights

Cockfights are popular in Hawaiʻi and throughout the world. They have been around for over 2500 years. Cockerel owners, pit their roosters against each other in fights to the death in this bizarre subculture. Sharp metal spokes called gaffs are attached to the bird's legs so lethal damage can be inflicted. In November of 2009 the Kauaʻi Police Depart (KPD) broke up a cockfighting event attended by more than 300. Cockfights were in progress and 15 roosters were dead when KPD officers crashed the party. More than 100 roosters, $70,000 in cash, 240 metal gaffs, numerous wooden crates used to transport the animals and a bit of marijuana were seized by the KPD.

Kaua'i Humane Society Director Becky Rhoades said the conditions of the injured birds were "horrible." 20 cockerels had to be euthanized.

"Practices such as cockfighting and dog fighting cause acute suffering and physical harm to animals and desensitizes both children and adults to the value of life and should be eliminated," Rhoades said.

Tourists and Locals

While many visitors and tourists are kept awake and angry due to the ceaseless cock-adoodling, the locals are accustomed to their red crested neighbors. Kauaians I spoke to had names for the roosters and hens inhabiting their backyard or garden. "They eat centipedes and they are clean," said Kino who was selling souvenirs at a popular lookout. "They have their place here now." The Health Department tests often for avian flue with no positive results so far. Perhaps God and Mother Nature are chuckling as they watch a bizarre version of Alfred Hitchcock's The birds become real life on Kauʻi.

Who is responsible for the Kauai chicken infestation?

See results

References

Animal Abuse: Cockfighting - over 100 birds seized - Kapa'a, HI | Pet-Abuse.Com Animal Cruelty Database http://www.pet-abuse.com/cases/15352/HI/US/#ixzz1mh4KN7RD

http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/facstaff/dagrossa-p/anth200/Fieldwork%20Papers/Cockfighting.pdf



Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • YogaKat profile imageAUTHOR

      YogaKat 

      6 years ago from Oahu Hawaii

      I too am saddened by roadkill. I try not to look to close at lumps in the middle of the road. Stessily, I am very grateful for your comments here. What AWESOME karma you bring to me and HubPages.

    • profile image

      stessily 

      6 years ago

      YogaKat, This sentence is charming, although may sometimes border on the annoying for someone not hanging loose: "At a green light in Hanalei we remained stopped as a hen trailed by chicks paraded across the road." It may seem like an impossible practice, but I wish that critters would be allowed always to cross roads in safety. Roadkill saddens me, because the critters were just going out for a bite to eat for themselves and to bring back to their offspring.

      As for cock fighting: If people want to spar in a ring with each other, that's one thing; training birds, dogs, etc., to fight for sport is a completely different can of worms which is unpalatable to me.

      Sentry's tale is charming; it's great that he feels comfortable about knowing his world, acquainting himself with passersby, and thereby introducing himself.

      Kind regards, Stessily

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)