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Eastern Water Dragon (Physignathus lesueurii subsp. lesuerii)

Updated on June 29, 2012

The following photo gallery of the Eastern Water Dragon, lesueurii subsp. lesueurii, a subspecies of the Australian Water Dragon. These lizards scurry away quickly into bushes when disturbed but many in public parks around Brisbane, Australia they have become used to humans, providing great photo opportunities. They are interesting animals, they wave their legs quickly at others to indicate dominance while a slow wave indicates submission. Head-bobbing is another form of communication between these lizards. Males are also territorial and will chase off any rivals on there patch.

A young Eastern Water Dragon looks towards the camera, must be hungry.
A young Eastern Water Dragon looks towards the camera, must be hungry. | Source
Physignathus lesueurii subsp lesueurii splayed out sun-baking on a rock.
Physignathus lesueurii subsp lesueurii splayed out sun-baking on a rock.
Another glance towards the camera in hopes of food by the Eastern Water Dragon
Another glance towards the camera in hopes of food by the Eastern Water Dragon
The patterning on Eastern Water Dragons is quite pretty.
The patterning on Eastern Water Dragons is quite pretty.
Something else catches this lizards eye and soon it scurries away.
Something else catches this lizards eye and soon it scurries away.
Another Physignathus lesueurii subsp. lesueurii, this one's a litte larger and older than the last.
Another Physignathus lesueurii subsp. lesueurii, this one's a litte larger and older than the last.
Eyes down-turned, looking for food as always.
Eyes down-turned, looking for food as always.
Must have gotten a little too hot in the sun for this lizard.
Must have gotten a little too hot in the sun for this lizard.
Finding Eastern Water Dragons in Brisbane, Australia is never a difficult task, here's another again sun-baking on a rock.  This one has a slightly lighter patterning when compared with the previous two lizards.
Finding Eastern Water Dragons in Brisbane, Australia is never a difficult task, here's another again sun-baking on a rock. This one has a slightly lighter patterning when compared with the previous two lizards.
A photo taken mid-blink.  You can see the third eyelid of this Eastern Water Dragon covering the eye, making it appear cloudy.
A photo taken mid-blink. You can see the third eyelid of this Eastern Water Dragon covering the eye, making it appear cloudy.
Again looking towards the camera for food.  I image many people feed them, unfortunately it means they end up with very little fear of humans
Again looking towards the camera for food. I image many people feed them, unfortunately it means they end up with very little fear of humans
A full-length photo of the Eastern Water Dragon highlighting the difference in skin patterning between the head, body, legs, and upper and lower tail sections.
A full-length photo of the Eastern Water Dragon highlighting the difference in skin patterning between the head, body, legs, and upper and lower tail sections.
Notice the yellow and red throat of Physignathus lesueurii subsp. lesueurii, the other subspecies Physignathus lesueurii subsp. howittii lacks this colouration.
Notice the yellow and red throat of Physignathus lesueurii subsp. lesueurii, the other subspecies Physignathus lesueurii subsp. howittii lacks this colouration.
Male Eastern Water Dragons have a brighter coloured throat than the females.  Juveniles also have less pronounced colouration on their throats.
Male Eastern Water Dragons have a brighter coloured throat than the females. Juveniles also have less pronounced colouration on their throats.
Close up of the head of an Eastern Water Dragon.
Close up of the head of an Eastern Water Dragon.
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