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How to Train a Dog with the Underground Dog Fence

Updated on October 3, 2016
During the first stages of the training, use a dog leash that is not made of metal to familiarize him first with the boundary and the electric stimulation.
During the first stages of the training, use a dog leash that is not made of metal to familiarize him first with the boundary and the electric stimulation.

Proper training is still the best key to success with any venture you want to undergo with your pet. You have problems on how to contain your pet inside your yard so you will resort to buying an underground dog fence to solve the problem. It is not that easy. You will not want the effect of just installing the electric fence around your boarders and putting the collar on your dog and let him roam around just like that. You should not let him get used to the shock coming from the collar. It should discipline him in a way that he will respect the purpose of the underground dog fence.

In order to achieve the best result and to avoid any negative effect to your pet, just follow these simple tips patiently:

1. Let them know the boundaries

Underground dog fence systems can be packaged with boundary flags to give your pet a visual presentation of the boundaries. During the first 5 days, you will need a dog leash to train your dog to recognize the fence boundaries. Do not use first the electric stimulation during this stage of the training. Let him walk around the yard and when the collar beeps, pull him away from the boundary flags. Do this in a daily basis from 10-15 minutes each session until he will be familiar with the collar beeps up to the time he will turn away from the boundary on his own.

Let him recognize the electric stimulation by using the lowest level of the dog fence system first.
Let him recognize the electric stimulation by using the lowest level of the dog fence system first.

2. Introduce the electric stimulation

After the first stage comes the introduction of the electric stimulation. Set the level to the lowest level first and let him roam around the yard. He will get curious and will try to cross the boundary but once he feels the electric stimulation, he will be disciplined. Extreme Dog Fence offers a product that has a five level setup you can choose from depending on your needs during the period of training. Let him do this for several times until he will continue his training to turn away from the boundary flags once his collar beeps. On these first stages chain your dog inside while undergoing this training unless he passes this second stage.

3. Train your dog to get away from distractions

Use distractions to tempt your dog to cross the boundary or let him out when you see other dogs passing by. You will know if he passed this stage when he will not cross the boundary no matter how you distract him.

4. Remove the leash and let him run

Let your dog run on the area without his leash. Keep watching him because it will be his first time to run on the yard on his own. Once he gets himself familiarized with the boundaries, you can now leave him alone outside. If for instance, he still attempts to cross the boundary, you can go back to using the leash.

5. Continuous monitoring

Like I said earlier, training your dog with the underground dog fence will take time and effort so you will need a lot of patience. You can leave your dog alone but must consistently check his behavior so that you can monitor if he is not violating the training rules. If he does, you can always go back to the other training stages until he will fully be trained.

Survey from users of underground dog fence conveys that it will take up to 5 weeks to train your dog with the system. Some pet owners will say the system is not effective but it all depends on your training and how patiently you do it.

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