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Kingsnakes

Updated on July 27, 2009
Kingsnake
Kingsnake

Kingsnake

What is a Kingsnake

Kingsnakes are a type of colubrid snake. A colubrid is a snake that is a member of the family Colubridae. Colubridae is a broad classification of snakes that includes about two thirds of all snake species on earth. These species are found on every continent, except Antarctica. King snakes are non venomous snakes. They are constrictors which means they kill their prey by a method called constricting. Constricting means killing prey by suffocating it. They hold their prey tightly enough and thus keeping it from taking air into its lungs. They do this by wrapping one or two coils around the prey.



Size

Adult Kingsnakes normally range in length from 1 - 1.5 meters but some have grown up to 2.1 meters.



Name

The name Kingsnake has been derived from the Common King Snake's habbit of preying upon and eating its fellow snakes including rattlesnakes and copperheads to whose venom they are immune and it won't affect them.



Distribution

Kingsnakes are found in six of the seven continents. They can survive everywhere else except Antarctica.



Life span of Kingsnakes

These snakes can survive for more than 30 years in captivity.



Diet of a Kingsnake

They are opportunistic  hunters. Their diet include small mammals, birds, bird eggs, snakes, bird eggs and amphibians. Occasionally some species of Kingsnakes are cannibalistic, which means they will feed upon their own young.

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    • Ultimate Hubber profile imageAUTHOR

      Ultimate Hubber 

      9 years ago

      lol... So, did you feared it every time you entered the house?

    • wannabwestern profile image

      Carolyn Augustine 

      9 years ago from Iowa

      We have had a few interesting experiences with kingsnakes at our country house in the desert. One hibernated in the flowerpot next to our front door.

    • Ultimate Hubber profile imageAUTHOR

      Ultimate Hubber 

      9 years ago

      I am glad you asked.

    • blue dog profile image

      blue dog 

      9 years ago from texas hill country

      the reason i asked is because of the saying "red on yellow kill a fellow."

    • Ultimate Hubber profile imageAUTHOR

      Ultimate Hubber 

      9 years ago

      Well now its a Kingsnake. Thanx for reminding. As kingsnakes have so many sub-species, I thought that snake would be one of its species but was not. Interestingly, this picture is on the first page of Google when you search kingsnake and not image results, the website results.

    • blue dog profile image

      blue dog 

      9 years ago from texas hill country

      is the snake pictured a kingsnake, or a coral snake? wouldn't want someone grabbing the wrong snake.

    • Ultimate Hubber profile imageAUTHOR

      Ultimate Hubber 

      9 years ago

      Its written as Kingsnakes, although people tend to write them as king snakes too which is not wrong. But scientifically "kingsnake" is correct and better.

    • Randy Godwin profile image

      Randy Godwin 

      9 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Speaking of king snakes...

    • Ultimate Hubber profile imageAUTHOR

      Ultimate Hubber 

      9 years ago

      lol. yea me too. Thanx Dame Scribe.

    • Dame Scribe profile image

      Dame Scribe 

      9 years ago from Canada

      I can't stand the critters. They give me the heebie jeebies, lol. :) Good info!

    • Ultimate Hubber profile imageAUTHOR

      Ultimate Hubber 

      9 years ago

      Thanx UW. Most people will not want to see a real snake in person. Snakes certainly can be nasty sometimes.

    • Uninvited Writer profile image

      Susan Keeping 

      9 years ago from Kitchener, Ontario

      Very nice hub. A cannibal snake :) I like looking at the pictures but I probably would not want to see one in person.

    • Ultimate Hubber profile imageAUTHOR

      Ultimate Hubber 

      9 years ago

      If you ask me it will be quite difficult for me to even touch any of them.

    • dohn121 profile image

      dohn121 

      9 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York

      Not a fan of snakes, although I can handle touching a corn snake, boa or Garder snake. But that's where I draw the line.

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