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Man's Best Friend Has a Name

Updated on November 26, 2018
Rodric29 profile image

Animals are the gift that God gives to men to train and tame. It is important to treat them with respect and love, our fellow neighbors.

Brandon

Man's best friend is named, Brandon.

That is at least the name of the author's last pet, a puppy named Brandon. Pets, specifically dogs are special to the human family. Owners form bonds with all animals, but dogs are special in that they seem of all the animals to have a more reciprocal affection towards their owners. Because of this bond, which, again, is not limited to dogs, naming a dog, a puppy is an important part of owner-pet affection. So What is man's best friend name? Discussed here is the importance of naming a dog, and how it forms the emotional bond to the dogs we love because dogs have personality.

Source

Many owners go with traditional dog names like Spike, or Jake. For my puppy, he had to stand out because, well, he was my puppy.

What's the deal with Brandon

I love dogs above all the animals to have for a pet. Having had tropical fish, and a cat, dogs are the easiest to cuddle with. These canine need to have affection, constantly. Because dogs are so innocent, it is easy to show them that affection and be completely open emotionally with them due to the fact that they will never judge their owners! Love dogs.

Brandon was not the only dog attachment I made, but the lasting one that still brings tears to my eyes that he is no longer with me. That's another story.

Choosing a name is not as easy for some as it might be for others. Many owners go with traditional dog names like Spike, or Jake. For my puppy, he had to stand out because, well, he was my puppy.

The deal with Brandon is that he is the one love that all other pets must compare to in a pet/owner companionship. He was a young pup when first I met him. As with many owners in my life, I picked Brandon because he was the runt of the litter. So came the emotional bond because I could identify with him.

That is the deal with Brandon, the quintessential pup. He pulled my heart strings.

Dogs become part of the family just like a kid. Now, of course, kids are humans and have more value than a dog. (I know several people that will argue with that statement.)

What is in a Name?

Naming the dog, the best friend is an honor. Oh, and the name is not for the dog, who couldn't care less, it is for the owner. Dogs respond to body language and smell as well as sound according to the research of Jan Hoffman in her article about researching the best names for dogs. 1 It is a good read. Check it out below in the resources section.

Not to get too religious here, but God gave the animals to humans to subdue and love. To subdue doesn't mean owners should beat and harm their pets, not. I mean through loving patience, owners get the privilege of earning the trust of one of God's creatures to be a faithful companion.

Of course, pet owners should come second to human companionship, another topic too, but never should owners neglect such needy things as dogs. It is my professional (Wink, professional? Guffaw!) opinion that we will be held accountable to how we treat other humans and animals at the judgment day. What's in a name, though?

Comparing it to naming a child might push the emotional attachment, but I going with it. I have seven kids, so I think I can get away with that. Dogs become part of the family just like a kid. Now, of course, kids are humans and have more value than a dog. (I know several people that will argue with that statement.) However, the bound owners share with a dog is just as vivid. Humans like cute things. By the time kids become teens, it is too late to stop loving them because the cuteness is gone. The love is permanently set in.

With a dog who has grown from a cute little pup in the owners care, a bond of love forms that never breaks if the relationship, just like with any being, is nurtured. Naming the thing that you love is an act of intimacy that goes beyond words, but we find a word that comes close in a name.

The Human Heart is in a Dog's Name.

Source

Name the dog whatever makes you feel happy. That is what the name is about. That is the science of naming the dog.

Because humans gain an emotional connection with the pets, it is up to us to make sure that the name we give to our dog is one that it will respond to when used. Though dogs do not feel the way humans feel, the respond better to things that appeal to them. Yes! Dogs respond to names that appeal to them better.

Irene Keliher states in her article on The Doggie People Blog that

Creativity and personal expression are important, sure, but when it comes to giving your dog a name, training is a top concern. Your dog will hear his name over and over, and will learn to respond to it when learning commands. In fact, veterinary behaviorists agree that dogs recognize their names because something happens after they hear them. In other words, it’s a more of a “cue” word than a personal identifier. 2

According to some of the views on dog naming, Brandon was not a good name for my pup. It worked for us, though. Naming a dog must be good for the dog and owner. If the dod has a long name Ebenezer, it may take a while for it to get used to responding to that queue. It is my belief that the dog will eventually catch on.

Name the dog whatever makes you feel happy. That is what the name is about. That is the science of naming the dog. All the other information are suggestions that may work better for the dog in the beginning, but it must work best for both in the long haul.

It is my professional opinion (snicker, wink again) that if owners decide their pets Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, it will be a long go at it, but the dog will learn to respond.

Source

Article Resources

Jan Hoffman - You Named Me Brutus? Really? Finding the right name for a dog can require research, debate and phonetic analysis. 1

Irene Keliher - How to Choose the Perfect Dog Name (with Science) | The Dog People by Rover.com 2

© 2018 Rodric Anthony

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    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 

      5 months ago from Queensland Australia

      Rodric, yes it is a little like social media here at times. We used to have a thumbs up button (could vote funny, interesting, etc) but they took those away maybe 4 or 5 years ago, unfortunately.

    • Rodric29 profile imageAUTHOR

      Rodric Anthony 

      5 months ago from Peoria, Arizona

      John, I tried to thumbs up your comment like we were on Facebook! Chortle! Chortle! I have social media on the brain. I wish we could have a like button. Alas, that would take away from the engagement here on Hubpages. I do not want us to become another social media site, though from the way we are focusing on discussions nowadays it seems like we have arrived.

      Pet love is real.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 

      5 months ago from Queensland Australia

      They most definitely can love.

    • Rodric29 profile imageAUTHOR

      Rodric Anthony 

      5 months ago from Peoria, Arizona

      John, thanks for reading and commenting. I am also sorry for your loss of Jackson. It is hard to lose a family member pet or human. In so saying, I don't equate animals to humans in value, but it merits mention that they do have value and create a real mournful heart when they pass away. I want to believe our animals love us as they are given to us to watch over. Science suggests they cannot love, per se--not as humans can. I still believe they love.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 

      5 months ago from Queensland Australia

      I enjoyed reading this article, Rodric. I have written articles about grieving the loss of a pet and how dogs can help in the grieving process. They are wonderful animals and any person who have never owned are dog are missing valuable lessons in unconditional love and companionship.

      Yes, their names are important and I feel should be easy for both the owner and dog to relate to. My two current dogs are Coco and Ginger (very much related to their colour I guess...but the names do suit them.) A dog we lost Another dog who passed away earlier this year was Jackson. I am glad you have happy memories of Brandon.Thanks for sharing.

    • Rodric29 profile imageAUTHOR

      Rodric Anthony 

      5 months ago from Peoria, Arizona

      Adrienne, I am a formal type person myself. I use the formal names of my kids and pets. The rest of the family does all the cutesy names. Okay, occasionally a cutesy name is tossed around. Right now we do not have pets, but my kids' grandpa has a pup named Thor, which is like our dog too.

    • alexadry profile image

      Adrienne Janet Farricelli 

      5 months ago

      So true, picking the name of a dog is important and choosing one that feels good to us can really affect how we relate to our dogs. My dogs have always had a formal name and several cutesy nicknames to use at specific times.

    • Rodric29 profile imageAUTHOR

      Rodric Anthony 

      5 months ago from Peoria, Arizona

      Zulma, thanks for so saying and reading the article. Talking about Brandon is bring back some happy memories. I guess I am over the sad parts now. Everything is sweet.

    • Rodric29 profile imageAUTHOR

      Rodric Anthony 

      5 months ago from Peoria, Arizona

      Thanks, Pamela. I still miss my Brandon. Brandon was a Dennis the Menace type. My grandma would not let me keep in in the house, but we got in on occasion quietly.

    • Rodric29 profile imageAUTHOR

      Rodric Anthony 

      5 months ago from Peoria, Arizona

      The research says that they do not care what their names are, but I don't necessarily buy that. It could be my emotional connection to my former pets since I have none right now. My father-in-law has a dog named Thor. I consider Thor my pet. We have petsat Thor and he is a bundle of energy even in his old age. I love Thor, who seems to enjoy his name. I was able to play with him on Thanksgiving. It has been months since we saw him.

      I digress, I want to get another pet, but right now we cannot afford to make the house pet safe for a dog with the pool in the back. We would have to get a pool cover since the pool gate would probably not be enough. Also, we still have five kids at the house. I want to be able to afford a dog. When the kids move out, in will move my new dog.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 

      5 months ago from USA

      This is a great article about being responsible in naming dogs. I like to name my pets based on their personality. Also, I like to hear how it sounds when I am calling out to them. I also believe the name should be a name the dog would enjoy hearing. I'm not a fan of giving dogs stupid little names like, "Fat Chuck" and "Bye-Bye." I had friends who gave their dog names like that. Does the dog like those names? I can't answer for them, but I kind of feel like they may not like it.

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      5 months ago from Sunny Florida

      Brandon sounds okay to me. A dog does become a member of the family, and their personalities make a huge differences. Interesting article.

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 

      5 months ago from United Kingdom

      Nice hub, Rodric. And I think Brandon is a wonderful name for your pup.

    • Rodric29 profile imageAUTHOR

      Rodric Anthony 

      5 months ago from Peoria, Arizona

      Yes, because of you, Bill. Thanks for helping come out of my writer shell and venture into unfamiliar areas. It maynot make the PetHelpful, but it is a start. I hope you get more readers to your blog. It is great.

      Here is the Link People: https://artistrywithwords.com/

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 

      5 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Branching out, I see. Good for you! It many not always be comfortable, but it does pay dividends over time, and I'm sure Brandon would agree with me. :)

    • Rodric29 profile imageAUTHOR

      Rodric Anthony 

      5 months ago from Peoria, Arizona

      Heidi, thank you for responding to the article. I don't want to believe that our dogs do not have the same feelings that we have for them. It makes it easier to identify with them based on their behavior than the science behind their behavior.

      Congratulations on the new addition to your family! I hope you guys get to enjoy her for a long time. Before I was married, I would staying with a family whith six dogs--all rescue dogs.

      Smoky had arthritis, Bandit was autistic (I don't know if that is possible, but that is what I was told), Misty was diabetic. I don't remember the other three's names. I formed a bond with the three I mentioned though I cleaned up after all six.

      I actually miss them though I've had kids instead of pets. I know that it was either or for me. We had a cat once, also named Misty. We took her to pet Co to have her kittens check out after she gave birth, but since we had no papers on her, she was a stray who picked us as her family, she was given away.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 

      5 months ago from Chicago Area

      With our most recent addition to the family, she was a rescue that had the same name her whole life. So we decided to stick with it since SHE was already identifying with the name. But she also seems to respond to "doggy girl," "sweetie," "pupper girl," and other impromptu nicknames. I think she doesn't really care about her name, as long as we're paying attention to her. :)

      Happy Monday!

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