ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Please Be Honest When You Are Selling Your Horse!

Updated on October 29, 2018
Ellison Hartley profile image

Ellison is a professional horse trainer and riding instructor. She runs a summer camp program and offers kids a safe introduction to horses.

Honesty In Your Advertisement

Please be truthful in your advertisements. Don't exaggerate a horses height by a couple inches, or downplay a horse's bad habits or vices.

Many buyers have a whole list of prospective horses they are planning on seeing. Which can be time-consuming. As well as costly, between gas driving around and paying a trainer to come with you if that is part of your horse shopping plan.

If you don't advertise your horse appropriately, you are not only wasting the prospective buyers time but your own time.

Advertise honestly and then spend your time with prospective buyers who actually might be a good fit, instead of ones who will just be frustrated that your horse wasn't what it is advertised to be.

I can honestly say that when I purchased this pony,Peanut, he was exactly as advertised. It was a great experience.
I can honestly say that when I purchased this pony,Peanut, he was exactly as advertised. It was a great experience. | Source

Height

It sometimes seems that if five people measured a horse they would get five different heights... Try your best to get a good height on your horse for your ad.

If someone is looking for a horse to compete with, having a horse being the appropriate size will be very important. So help by making sure you have an accurate height. Another thing I have found is helpful, is if you have a photo of the horse being ridden, tell the height of the rider. That way it puts things into perspective for those looking at the ad.

Riders looking to use their horse for competitive disciplines will want a horse that is an appropriate size, so being honest and accurate about your horses size is important.
Riders looking to use their horse for competitive disciplines will want a horse that is an appropriate size, so being honest and accurate about your horses size is important. | Source

Training And Experience

Give an accurate account of your horse's training and experience. Remember, you are trying to find not just a match for your horse, but the right match. One that will be a long-term home for him hopefully.

Exaggerating how well a horse is trained could potentially get an inexperienced rider hurt. Not to mention just be a waste of someone's time if it isn't appropriately trained for what they want to do.

Ask professionals their opinion of your horse when you are advertising so they can help you give the best description. Make sure you are honest about what he has done, if he has only begun to jump or trail ride, whatever the case may be...you should use words like "prospect" or "potentially good for". That way it is very clear to a potential buyer whether or not the horse has the skills that are appropriate for their ability level.

Be honest about your horses training and the skills it has. Is it proven at a certain discipline or still a prospect? To a buyer that makes a big difference
Be honest about your horses training and the skills it has. Is it proven at a certain discipline or still a prospect? To a buyer that makes a big difference | Source

Soundness

If your horse is 100 % sound as far as you know, great, advertise him as such. Just don't be surprised if a potential buyer still gets a pre-purchase exam done.

If you know your horse can be sound with maintenance, explain that. Explain the problem, explain what type of maintenance is necessary, about how much it costs to do. Then explain what your horse's limitations are if there are any.

Leading someone to believe your horse is sound and rideable is not is not doing justice to your horse. If someone gets him and can't ride him, he will probably be rehomed again, and who knows where he will end up. Don't you think it is better for him to find the right kind of home, whatever that may be? That way where he goes can hopefully be a long-term home for him or even better a forever home!

Remember if you fib or leave something out about the horse's health and soundness, it will come out in a vet check, and then you have wasted someones time and money. You wouldn't like it if you were put into that situation, don't do it to someone else!

Molly is one of my great lesson horses. She is excellent at her job, but has limitations due to her front leg conformation causing her soundness problems.
Molly is one of my great lesson horses. She is excellent at her job, but has limitations due to her front leg conformation causing her soundness problems. | Source

Don't Be Pushy

I cannot tell you how many times I have been to see a horse for sale and been told: " a serious buyer is coming to look tomorrow". Maybe it is true, but being pushy to buyers is a turn-off, big time! It is perfectly acceptable that a buyer would come to look at your horse. Thank you and then say they will get back to you. Buyers should be looking at a lot of horses to compare and get an idea of what they really want. Don't expect a yes or no answer on the first visit. Some buyers may want to come and ride the horse a second time before they make any decisions. Be respectful and flexible with the buyers you meet. Since you are the seller provide a great customer service experience. Make the buyer feel like you are not pushing them into anything and that you are trustworthy!!!!!

Be Patient,not pushy and you will find the right buyer for your horse!
Be Patient,not pushy and you will find the right buyer for your horse! | Source

Pricing

Be careful when pricing your horse that you remember that your love and attachment to it. Or even the money you have invested over the time you have owned it, shouldn't affect the price you put on your horse.

Price him like he was someone else's horse that you don't have attachment or investment in. Then your price will be more realistic and attract more appropriate buyers.

Keep in mind, most buyers usually assume that you priced your horse with a little wiggle room, in order to be able to take offers and still get what you want from the horse. If the price is not negotiable, make sure that is in the ad, so that someone wouldn't waste their time. Looking at a horse a little out of their budget thinking they can make an offer.

Be realistic when pricing your horse!
Be realistic when pricing your horse! | Source

The Golden Rule

The golden rule applies everywhere in life and fits right in with selling horses. Be honest, and don't do anything that you wouldn't want to be done to you if you were the buyer instead of the seller.

Horses get sold all the time for lots of reasons. There is nothing wrong with selling your horse, for whatever your reason might be. Being honest and respectful is not only the best way to quickly sell your horse. It is also the best way to find the right home for your horse! One that will hopefully last a very long time and make someone very happy!!!

Live by the golden rule, even when you are selling horses!
Live by the golden rule, even when you are selling horses! | Source

Comments

Submit a Comment

No comments yet.

working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)