ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Five Things You Should Know Before Raising Chickens.

Updated on June 26, 2013
Our coop, once a playhouse, now a chicken house (or as my son calls it a "chicken home")
Our coop, once a playhouse, now a chicken house (or as my son calls it a "chicken home")

1. The coop doesn't have to cost a ton to get the job done.

There are plenty of pre-fabricated coops online or at your local livestock/feed store. You're also bound to find them littered all over craigslist. My brother-in-law has a beautiful coop that he bought, and if you want to throw down the money for it that's fine. I'm more of a do-it-yourselfer. Tons of things (often things people are giving away for free) are able to be reclaimed into wonderful coops! We ended up taking an old play structure that a neighbor's kids had outgrown. He was happy to be rid of it, and we had the perfect framework for a coop. Large doghouse can also work for making small coops and chicken tractors.

Shoot, let the kids pet them too. Just remember to wash your hands after handling them.
Shoot, let the kids pet them too. Just remember to wash your hands after handling them.
"If you want nice chickens who will pose for photos like us, then just hold us when we're babies!"
"If you want nice chickens who will pose for photos like us, then just hold us when we're babies!"

2. Hold the chicks.

Chickens aren't naturally friendly; they're naturally dumb, but not necessarily friendly. They eat, poop, sleep and eventually lay eggs (they've even been known to sleep in apple trees and refuse to come into the coop at night, preferring instead to be eaten by raccoons.)

But in all seriousness we can make a chicken friendly, or at least less horrible. With a little extra work on the front end you will make the world of difference to your flock and greatly increase the joy you receive from them. Now if you're planning on raising meat birds you can skip this, as I don't see much of a reason for bonding with something you're just going to kill, but if you're like us and are raising them for the eggs (and the experience) then the first 4-6 weeks you have new chicks there is one crucial piece of advice I can give you. HOLD THEM EVERY DAY. Yes, every day. Hold each chick, at least once a day, preferably twice. There are tons of sites out there giving directions on how to hold chicks, so I won't waste your time, just remember it will cause them less stress if you are calm, and if you do not come down from above them (like a predator would). My Uncle has chickens and when he wants to catch one he has to corner them and use a net which seems terrifying for the poor bird. When I want to pick up one of my chickens I simply walk over to it and pick it up. Holding a chick is fun, holding them all every day can be time consuming, but well worth it, especially if you have young kids.

It's not like I'm giving you an impossible task. Baby chicks are adorable. Hold them!
It's not like I'm giving you an impossible task. Baby chicks are adorable. Hold them!
Hey I laid an egg!
Hey I laid an egg!

3. Plan your flock size and buy chicks accordingly!

Perhaps one of the most difficult things in the world, is not going hog-wild at the feed store when you're buying your chicks. However, before you head to the store take a good look at your coop, run, and most importantly your roost-space and determine how many chickens you can house in a safe and healthy way. As tempting as it may be, don't buy more chicks just because you don't have one that color yet, or because your five year old really wants one (like I did) and stick to the plan. Do your research beforehand and know what breeds you want before you leave the house. This is not a time for window shopping. We were looking for docile egg layers and came back with some wonderful Plymouth Barred Rocks, Rhode Island Reds, and my favorite, the Amaraucana (aka Easter Egger) which laid green eggs. On impulse we also came home with a Silver Laced Wyandotte, who was a beautiful, but ornery chicken, and a few straight-run Silkie chicks who are horrible egg layers, but crazy adorable, and also turned out to be roosters and thus ended up on the dinner table. Bottom line: just get what you came for and get them all at the same time. Introducing chicks is easy, but adult chicken introduction is not. (If you do end up with a crow in the wee hours of the morning, here is a humane way to take care of the problem.)

4. If it's off the ground, partially enclosed, and you put straw in it, it's a nest box.

Pretty much enough said. I wish I'd known the first point when building our coop as I put our nest boxes on the ground level, making it easier for dirty chicken feet to soil the nest box. When the nest boxes are higher, and preferably with a perch in front for them to hop onto before entering most of the dirt will get knocked off of them before they lay.


5. Automate as much as you can.

Save yourself tons of time by installing low-maintenance feeding and watering systems to fit your coop design. PVC pipe watering systems can be a great way to get water inside the coop with little to no mess. We installed a gravity feeder and refill it weekly. I have children to collect eggs, so I don't have to worry there. Now if I can just make the coop lock itself up at night and open again in the morning I'll be happy.

Here are my favorite to books on raising chickens, one for facts and one for fun.

Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens, 3rd Edition: Care, Feeding, Facilities
Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens, 3rd Edition: Care, Feeding, Facilities

This book is hands down, the best thing you can have if you're wanting to raise chickens. I've referenced this book so many times in the last year it isn't even funny. It covers coops, breeds, diseases, even how to show chickens. It's thorough and well worth the money.

 

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • MissKrisCayllie profile image

      MissKrisCayllie 

      2 years ago from Jersey Shore

      Great article!! We have been thinking about raising hens ourselves.

    • Millionaire Tips profile image

      Shasta Matova 

      5 years ago from USA

      This is all great advice. My sister has chickens and they are still working on building a chicken coop!

    • compu-smart profile image

      Compu-Smart 

      5 years ago from London UK

      I love eggs more-so than Chickens so it's good to know that I have all I need here to raise them. thanks.

    • Angelo52 profile image

      Angelo52 

      5 years ago from Central Florida

      Great article. Thanks for the information. I'm hoping to have a small chicken coop in my future. The information you provided should come in handy then.

    • sideyardflock profile imageAUTHOR

      H.A.Cummings 

      5 years ago from Washington State

      You can find so many coop-able things on craigslist it isn't even funny! Most of them are free, you just have to look at things a little sideways and dream a little.

    • aethelthryth profile image

      aethelthryth 

      5 years ago from American Southwest

      Great ideas for coops! The cost of the coop is the major reason we don't have chickens yet. Looks like we weren't thinking creatively enough.

    • sideyardflock profile imageAUTHOR

      H.A.Cummings 

      5 years ago from Washington State

      Thanks, and it was free! Even better!

    • CZCZCZ profile image

      CZCZCZ 

      5 years ago from Oregon

      Love the idea of using an old playhouse for the kids as a chicken coop.

    • sideyardflock profile imageAUTHOR

      H.A.Cummings 

      5 years ago from Washington State

      I should get some mealworms, I bet they'd love that. My kids enjoy digging up worms, and when I'm pulling weeds I'll often take one of my big fat girls with me to help turn over the soil. :-)

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 

      5 years ago from Iowa

      This is great advice for the would-be chicken owner. I got three chicks last summer and they have turned into three wonderful pets that lay delicious eggs for me every day. My girls are very friendly - I feed them meal worm treats right out of my hand - and are quite entertaining. They also are a little spoiled, I must admit. But even my husband, who was very skeptical at first, is glad we got them.

    • sideyardflock profile imageAUTHOR

      H.A.Cummings 

      5 years ago from Washington State

      Our community has restrictions against roosters...but we didn't want any of those anyway. :-) Thanks for the compliments!

    • Jordan Hake profile image

      Jordan Hake 

      5 years ago from Southwest Missouri, USA

      Great job! I'm looking at getting some chickens soon and I'll be sure to take your advice!

    • KDeus profile image

      Keely Deuschle 

      5 years ago from Florida

      Great article! I've seriously considered raising chickens, although my community has restrictions. An acquaintance of mine has also used their children's outgrown playhouse for their coop. Keep the great articles coming and welcome to hubpages!

    • sideyardflock profile imageAUTHOR

      H.A.Cummings 

      5 years ago from Washington State

      Yes, this is my first hub, thanks for the compliment!

    • profile image

      Guest 

      5 years ago

      Is this your first hub? You are a natural. Keep writing. Voted up and useful.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)