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Weird Animals – The Gastric Brooding Frog

Updated on December 8, 2015

Weird Animals – the Gastric Brooding Frog

You know, of course, of my supernatural skill in interviewing deceased celebrities – Genghis Khan, for example. And weird animals like the Tree Shrew.

Now I have achieved a tremendous breakthrough. I have interviewed a deceased … celebrated … weird … animal. Not just any weird animal. But the fascinating one-of-a-kind gastric brooding frog.

It was late in the evening and I was adjusting my brain wave apparatus which receives signals from chosen subjects throughout the world. I cannot reveal much about its composition – WikiLeaks would kill for that information ... but aluminum foil is a major component. Suddenly, I heard this tiny little amphibian voice:

That's me next to the large paper clip.

Gastric Brooding Frog and friend
Gastric Brooding Frog and friend | Source

Are you there, drbj? Are you there?

Where was this voice coming from? It wasn’t an insomniac neighbor or my landline, my cellphone, my imitation iPad, my computer, or my television.

I realized someone or something was trying to contact me – supernaturally. Here is our conversation, verbatim:

me – This is drbj. Who is this and why are you calling me at midnight?

Voice – This is the last Gastric Brooding Frog. Sorry about the lateness of the hour. Time is no longer of the essence to me. I have a story that Basil said you would like to hear.

me – Basil?

Voice – You know, Basil, the Green Basilisk Lizard you recently interviewed. The one who walks on water that the natives in Costa Rica call the ‘Jesus Christ Lizard.’

me – Oh, right, that Basil. Please give him my regards and tell me your story, Mr. Gastric Brooding Frog.

Voice – It’s Ms. Gastric Brooding Frog. My scientific name is Rheobatrachus silus but you may call me Distressed, or D for short.

me – Distressed? I’m sorry to hear that.

D – You would be, too, if you were not only deceased but also extinct.

me – I’m sorry to hear that, too. What happened?

Queensland, Australia
Queensland, Australia | Source
I'm small in size, but large in eyes.
I'm small in size, but large in eyes. | Source

The Story of D

D – Once upon a time there were two species of gastric brooding frogs living in Queensland, eastern Australia – the Northern branch and the Southern branch. We were very different in appearance from other frogs. And extremely unique in behavior.

me – How was your behavior so unique?

D – I’ll explain in a moment. As far as appearance, I was a Southerner, y’all, so I was smaller than my Northern cousins.

me – How small is small?

D – Female frogs like me reached 2 inches in length; males 1½ inches. Northern females let themselves go – they reached 3 inches in length; males 2 inches. In both species, the ladies were larger than the guys. For a very good reason. We have an astounding ability …

me – Which was … ?

D – I’m getting to that. We were considered medium-size frogs with dark gray or slate-colored bumpy skin. Our fingers were long, pointy and slender without webbing although our toes were fully webbed. Just like most other Australian aquatic frogs.

me – So, how did you differ in appearance?

D – Our most distinctive feature was our way-out-of-proportion, large protruding eyes which were positioned very close together behind our short blunt snout. We looked like we were wearing headlights.

Also our skin was moist and coated with mucus. Insensitive people used labels and called us slimy.

Unique Behavior

me – Now tell me more about your unique behavior.

D – We lived in rainforests and our favorite habitat was the edge of rock pools in shallow streams, among leaf litter, under or between stones, or in rock crevices. We ate all the insects that we could find on land and in the water.

In the colder months, we hibernated … and caught up on our reading. I was very disappointed by “Fifty Shades of Grey.”

me – How so?

D – I heard it used a lot of ‘f-words’ and thought that meant ‘frog.’ (laughs)

me (chuckling in spite of myself) Okay, enough procrastination. What is the extremely unique behavior you mentioned?

D – Take a moment to think about our name: the Gastric Brooding Frog. What do you think that means?

It's me regurgitating a baby frog.

Source

Astounding Ability

me – Well, gastric relates to or involves the stomach. Brooding, as an adjective, means to show deep unhappiness by being dejected, despondent and/or depressed. Which you admit you are. As a verb it means to sit on or hatch eggs.

D – Correct! We female Gastric Brooding Frogs are known for our unique mode of reproduction. We do hatch our baby eggs but not by sitting on them. After external fertilization by the daddy frog, we swallow our eggs.

me(amazed) You actually swallow them? For real?

D – Would I lie to you? Yes, absolutely real. We produce as many as 40 eggs, and raise the baby tadpoles in our stomach which becomes a temporary womb.

When they are ready to hatch, we give birth by regurgitating our little froggy babies from our mouths.

What is Gerd?

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic symptom of mucosal damage caused by stomach acid coming up from the stomach into the esophagus. In the U.S., 20% or 7 million people suffer from this disease.

me – Unique isn’t a strong enough description. That is positively miraculous. How can the eggs survive in the acid environment of your stomach?

D – That’s a very good question. During the brooding stage, we do not eat and our stomachs temporarily stop producing normal hydrochloric acid.

me – Unbelievable. How do you accomplish that feat?

D – When we swallow the fertilized eggs, prostaglandin (PGE2) in the jelly around each egg turns off the production of stomach acid while the embryonic eggs develop into tadpoles. Later, the mucus excreted from the tadpoles' gills continues to supply the PGE2 we need.

Important Note: This acid-free condition of the Gastric Brooding Frog may one day provide insight to physicians on the treatment of stomach ulcers and GERD which are so prevalent in humans.

me – Do all of the 40 or so eggs you swallow become tadpoles?

D – Only 20 to 26 of the eggs generally survive.

me – Because they exhaust their yolk supply?

D – No, each egg has more than enough yolk to feed the growing tadpole. But sometimes, by accident, I digest the first few eggs I swallow. Mea culpa. Mea culpa.

me – Don’t feel guilty, please. Your parental ability is amazing. How long does it take for the tadpoles to develop in your stomach?

D – About six weeks. My stomach continues to increase until it almost fills my body cavity. I remain active but cut down on my dance lessons. (Giggles)

When the tadpoles are completely developed, I regurgitate them over a period of time that may take as long as one week. If I am disturbed, I may regurgitate all my youngsters in one single act of propulsive vomiting.

me – Does that harm them?

D – No, they are fully developed and off they hop. I’m an ‘empty nester,’ I mean empty stomach, once again. I can resume eating after three or four days. And dancing.

Kermit the Frog
Kermit the Frog | Source

Extinction

me – I know that you are distressed because both species of Gastric Brooding Frogs are believed to be extinct. No one has seen you-all since the early 80s.

D – What is most distressing is that the cause is unknown. The suspects include pollution, parasites, the destructive chytrid fungus, loss of habitat, and over-eager collectors like Kermit the Frog.

The part about rapacious collectors is true but I’m just kidding about Kermit. He’s a buddy of mine.

Return of the Baby Belching Frog

Preserved specimen of Gastric Brooding Frog
Preserved specimen of Gastric Brooding Frog | Source
Great Barred Frog
Great Barred Frog | Source

Amazing News

me – Isn't it amazing that in March of this year, Australian scientists made such an unbelievable presentation to the National Geographic Society?

They successfully re-constructed your embryos by combining your preserved genetic DNA with the eggs of a related species, the Great Barred Frog.

D – That IS jolly good news.

me – The bad news is that the new embryos only survived for three days. But the researchers are optimistic about the possibility of bringing your species back to life soon.

D – I do appreciate your sharing that and eagerly look forward to that day. I’ll say good-bye for now the Gastric Frog Way: eeeeeehm ... eeeeeehm … eeeeeehm.’

me‘eeeeeehm … eeeeeehm … eeeeeehm’ to you, too, my friend. Is that like ‘ribbit, ribbit, ribbit’ we hear from American frogs?

D – Don’t think so; I learned it from my folks. Though I really don’t have a clue. Let’s just say it means ‘Hooroo!’’

Hooroo is strine (Australian slang) for Goodbye.

Darwin Frog
Darwin Frog | Source

Darwin Frog

I must contact D immediately to share this news. There is a frog (Rhinoderma darwinii) living in the South American jungle that was originally discovered by Charles Darwin.

This intriguing frog has a very similar child-rearing technique. It scoops up newly hatched tadpoles and stores them inside its specially adapted vocal pouch. When they are fully formed froglets, they are expelled (vomited) just like the Gastric Brooding Frog. But the Darwin Frog is male! Would they not make a perfect couple?


© Copyright BJ Rakow, Ph.D. 2013. All rights reserved. Author, "Much of What You Know about Job Search Just Ain't So."


Learn to write a dynamic resume and cover letter, network effectively, interview confidently, and negotiate salary.

Comments for Weird Animals - the Gastric Brooding Frog

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    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Hi, Devika. Thanks for the 'well done.' My research on the Gastric Brooding Frog surprised even me - such an unusual species.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Weird Animals – The Gastric Brooding Frog an interesting and informative hub about such behaviors well done on the presentation.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Ah, JRocco, your comments are music for my soul. Amazing? Funny? Brilliant? Now that makes two of us! And the pleasure of sharing is all mine, m'luv.

    • profile image

      JRocco 4 years ago

      Wow, I had no clue about these type of frogs. This was amazing and funny.

      Thank you for sharing. You are brilliant!!!!!

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Have missed you, Ruby, so was doubly delighted to see you here. Loved your comment: 'thank God for tinfoil.' My sentiments, exactly. Thanks for loving this. How are you doing at Bubblews?

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Wow, Linda - creative AND brilliant? I hit the jackpot with your lovely comment. I had fun writing about this unusual creature and hope as you do that it can be resurrected. Thanks for all the button-pushing, m'dear.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Thank you, Peg. Delighted you enjoyed this interview and thanks for the sublime comments. So that's the cause of the GBF's demise - all that despicable hairspray. If your bullfrog comes my way, I'll do my best to make him talk. Promise.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Thanks for venturing into the weirdness with me, Dolores. Yes, it is sad about the extinction but perhaps we can one day bring back this amazing Brooding Frog. Thanks for the gracious comments, m'dear.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      What a lovely compliment, shanmarie, thank you and you are welcome ... any time!

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Then I will have to check out Bubblews, nicomp. Thanks for the heads-up.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

      And to think i almost missed this! This was so interesting. The Gastric Brooding Frog is a remarkable species. I hope they can be brought back. Your communication with animals is priceless, we would never know about the little frog if it not for your super abilities, thank God for tin foil. Loved it. Thank you...

    • Minnetonka Twin profile image

      Linda Rogers 4 years ago from Minnesota

      drbj-what's it like to be so creative and brilliant? I had so much fun learning about this extinct frog. I do hope the scientist's will be able to bring them back. I seldom hit all buttons but this deserved them all. Great hub my friend.

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      This was amazing, Drbj. You are truly deserving of the Funniest Hubber Award. Your interview with the Gastric Breeding Froggie was both educational and entertaining. Those little guys probably went extinct from the big hair of the eighties - all that hairspray... I'm sending you this bullfrog who has recently invaded my yard. He needs someone to talk to.

    • Dolores Monet profile image

      Dolores Monet 4 years ago from East Coast, United States

      Leave it to drbj to take us into some weirdness like this one. Sad for the loss of the Brooding Frog (which makes it sound sad and in contemplation of its own demise) but I do find the creature kinda yucky. This is another great one, dear!

    • shanmarie profile image

      shanmarie 4 years ago

      Always a pleasure to read your hubs! Your ability to entertain while sharing so much information is unmatched.

    • nicomp profile image

      nicomp really 4 years ago from Ohio, USA

      I have been at BubbleWs. They don't count words and they pay out, mostly.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Aha, nicomp, you noticed! I commend you, dear friend, for your profound perceptive perspicacity. Thank you for finding D and me. Where have you been?

    • nicomp profile image

      nicomp really 4 years ago from Ohio, USA

      Without question this is the only Internet publication I've ever read that included both brain wave apparatus and gastric breeding frogs.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Nice to see you here, Laura. What a lovely comment ... I kept you reading the whole darn thing. That's my mission you know, in addition to supplying humorous but educational information. Thank you for the Up, m'dear.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Seems like you, Nell, love this interview as much as D did. 'Fascinating and amazing' is what she said, too. :)

      And you are so right. We humans need to find ways to keep all these endangered species of animals safe from extinction.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Hi, Martie. Thanks for your very perceptive question: 'why the new re-constructed (gastric brooding frog) embryos only survived for three days?' That's what those Australian scientists are asking, but they are optimistic about finding the answer. So is D!

      Sorry about your jaw-dropping - do hope you have recovered, m'dear. Thanks for the congrats and the most gracious complimentary comments. 'Wings of humor,' eh? Love it, love it! I promise to continue the 'good work' as long as possible.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Delighted, Jeannie, that you stopped by and found it interesting and exciting that I have the unique talent of communicating with deceased animals. It wasn't too much of a stretch, y'know, since I have been able to communicate with deceased celebrities like Al Capone, Napoleon, Genghis, Bruce Lee, and a few others. Interviewing D was a breeze!

    • izettl profile image

      Lizett 4 years ago from The Great Northwest

      How you got me to be interested in an egg swallowing mystery of nature, is beyond me. But you kept me reading the whole darn thing with your factual and humorous style. Voted up!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

      Hi drbj, I love your interviews! lol! and this was totally fascinating. I learned something new, and the Gastric Brooding Frog is amazing! or should I say was amazing, I just hope we all learn to respect and keep our animals safe in the future in any way we can, wonderful!

    • MartieCoetser profile image

      Martie Coetser 4 years ago from South Africa

      What a fascinating frog! I wonder why the new re-constructed embryos only survived for three days?

      My jaws are on my lap.

      Thanks for this precious information about the The Gastric Brooding Frog as well as the Darwin Frog, drbj! Congratulations too on your well-deserved HubPages award. You are indeed the funniest hubber, but you are also the genius among us, able to present the most interesting information on the wings of humour.

      Please continue the good work, my dear professor :)))

    • Jeannieinabottle profile image

      Jeannie InABottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD

      How interesting that even dead animals are able to communicate with you. That is quite a talent. Thank you for this exciting interview!

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Hi, Dianna. Thank you for your vote of funny confidence and your gracious comments. The GBF may be one of the most weird animals/amphibians I have yet encountered. Thanks for the Up and the pluses.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      'One of a kind' Mary? Thanks for returning, m'luv, and I do take your meaning in the best possible way. Promise.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      You are so welcome, Alicia, and thanks for stopping by and the comments of approbation. I would have answered you sooner but I have been engrossed in my study of prions ... thanks to you, m'dear. :)

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Hi, suzie, thank you for loving this and finding it entertaining and educational. 'Sfunny, but D liked it, too.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Your friend is absolutely amazing, bp, tell me where I may contact her - she would be a fount of information for an interview. In retrospect, I may have come across one or two women with similar maternal proclivities. Thanks for the Up and the adjectives, m'dear. Where are you these days?

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Hi, Thelma. We must be on the same wave length, m'dear. You used all the favorite adjectives I like to read: 'amazing, educational, humorous, funny and interesting.'

      Thank you, and enjoy your weekend. Hope it is at least one or more of my favorite adjectives above.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Thank you, dear Audrey, for your silver-tongued, effusive, eloquent, congratulatory comments. A genius? Wow! Now there are two of us who believe that! :)

      You have been a fervent. fecund follower all these years and I look forward to many years more. Where are you writing these days, m'dear? I miss reading your enlightening, exuberant hubs. Your faithful fan, bj

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      The first thing I thought of, Cynthia, when I read your comment - 'Who would have thought it, eating your own kids?' - was I think I have seen a few mothers who may have felt that way when their children were behaving badly. :)

      Thanks for enjoying this and more power to the scientists involved in this unique frog's being brought back to life.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      I do agree, Genna, the Gastric Brooding Frog may be one of the more weird animals I have discovered - on a par with the Tree Shrew, the Proboscis Monkey and the Banana Spider.

      Thank you for looking forward to my 'delightful and educational hubs,' and for describing them so. In answer to your question, the stomach of the pregnant, so to speak, GBF, takes up her entire abdominal cavity. She is almost all stomach.

      Thanks for finding my hubs priceless, m'dear, that's exactly how I feel about you! And thanks for the Up and the sharing.

    • drbj profile image
      Author

      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      What a generous comment, Genna, that you would have tweaked the title of 'Funniest Hubber' to include 'Best Educational Humorist.' On my behalf, I thank you, m'dear.

      Thanks for taking the time to include excerpts of my 'two shades' of writing. You are a sweetie. And marvelously perceptive, to boot.

      The final paragraph of your comment, gushing and all (which almost made me blush), makes all the time and research necessary more than worthwhile. Trust me.

    • drbj profile image
      Author

      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Delighted, Nellieanna, that I could share some new knowledge about both these special frogs. I enjoy observing unique creatures . . . animals, too! It would be close to miraculous if researchers could resurrect the Gastric Brooding Frog - the Australian scientists seem to be on the right track.

      I'm also so happy that you, the correctly dubbed "Best Poet on HP," find my humorous/serious explanations fun to read. That's my mission, y'know.

      D says not to worry, she still adores Kermit ... and Miss Piggy.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Sorry about the repetitive comment above - HP is feeling bodacious today.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Thanks for the clever approbation, Bill, which is more than meaningful coming from the "Best All-Around Hubber' at HP, and they surely got that right!

      You just keep enjoying my hubs, my friend, and if you happen to learn a little something new, it's my extreme pleasure. Love your 'daily double' remark.

      May your weekend be special! Nice special, that is.

    • drbj profile image
      Author

      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Thanks for the clever approbation, Bill, which is more than meaningful coming from the "Best All-Around Hubber' at HP, and they surely got that right!

      You just keep enjoying my hubs, my friend, and if you happen to learn a little something new, it's my extreme pleasure. Love your 'daily double' remark.

      May your weekend be special! Nice special, that is.

    • drbj profile image
      Author

      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      I know about that poisonous Bufo frog, Mary, because they seem to be very prolific in my neck of the woods. Must be the lovely ocean breeze that attracts them. I'll do my best to avoid meeting any in person though. Thanks for the reminder. Thanks also for the Up, the et ceteras, and the sharing, m'luv.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 4 years ago

      I voted you as the funniest for 2013, and this post proves your wonderful wit and humor in writing for the vote. I never heard of this frog and don't know if I would want to see it, especially after it vomits its tadpoles out. Very interesing post and voted up++.

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 4 years ago from Florida

      I forgot to congratulate you on winning the Hubbie Award when I commented before. You are one of a kind and I mean that in the best possible way.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Interesting, informative and funny - a great combination, drbj! Thanks once again for the education and the entertainment.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Now you know, Jim, I would never make fun of any brethren or amphibian friend of yours. Just keep writing your incisive political hubs that won you the deserved title of Political Hubber of the Year.

    • drbj profile image
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      drbj and sherry 4 years ago from south Florida

      Dear Petra - I'm so happy that you are still on HP, and that you enjoyed the Story of D. This creature IS amazingly interesting as you pointed out. Thank you for you precious comments. If you keep reading my humorous hubs, then I shall keep writing them. Promise!

    • suziecat7 profile image

      suziecat7 4 years ago from Asheville, NC

      Loved this - entertaining as well as educational - thanks, Drbj.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 4 years ago

      I have a friend who is definitely married to Gastric Brooding Frog. The woman swallows her young and when she has had enough she spits them out!!! Voted up and very, very funny and informative.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 4 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Hilarious drbj, and educational. I think I saw a gastric brooding frog down in the back pond....no wait they are extinct, so I may have to go have a closer look. Anyway, hooroo and keep writing your great hubs.

    • Thelma Alberts profile image

      Thelma Alberts 4 years ago from Germany

      Amazing, educational, humorous and interesting read. As always, it´s funny and I enjoyed reading this. Thanks for sharing. Have a great week!

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 4 years ago from Nashville Tn.

      Dear drbj - I'm writing to congratulate you on winning the Hubbie Award and to tell you I believe you are a genius. You are truly the only one like you...

      As you know, I've been a fan for years and you may never, ever get rid of me. (Especially when you write your incredible hubs such as this one.)

      Thank you for reading my comment when you already have so many others to read.

      Fanfully yours,

      vocalcoach

    • CMHypno profile image

      CMHypno 4 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

      Who would have thought it, eating your own kids. Informative and amusing hub as always drbj. It's a real shame that these fascinating frogs have become extinct, so let's hope the scientists can genetically 'resurrect' them

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      I do so look forward to your delightful and educational hubs here on weird animals, and yes, I have to say, this is one weird frog you have discovered to share with us all. Wow ... just how big are their stomachs! hehehe Thank you for educating us in such fun manner. Your hubs are priceless!

      Up and more and sharing

      Hugs, Faith Reaper

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 4 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      This is why you won the Hubbie Award,drbj…and richly deserved. I would have tweaked it a tad to run the title something along the lines of, “Best educational humorist.”

      “In the colder months, we hibernated … and caught up on our reading. I was very disappointed by “Fifty Shades of Grey.””

      “When we swallow the fertilized eggs, prostaglandin (PGE2) in the jelly around each egg turns off the production of stomach acid while the embryonic eggs develop into tadpoles.”

      The deadpan delivery is flawless, the science is meticulous and written in a disarming way that keeps us smiling and waiting for the next line with both interest and relish; the flow, perfection. I’m sorry if it sounds as though I’m gushing, but I just love these! :-)

    • Nellieanna profile image

      Nellieanna Hay 4 years ago from TEXAS

      I love this, Dr. BJ! I feel so knowledgeable now about both the extinct Gastric Brooding Frog but that Great Barred Frog and the Darwin frog, too. Most helpful they are to science.

      These unique creatures give us much to ponder. I liked the video. Too bad people aren't as eager to avoid helping to cause creatures to become extinct as we become about trying to recreate them, though. Good ole hindsight. Once they're extinct, so much simpler to see which ones on which to focus. Be nice if we considered all our sharers of the Earth in our head-long drive to subdue it.

      On the lighter note, your humor-laced serious explanations make learning new stuff such fun! I was truly relieved that "D" has no hard feelings toward Kermit. That would really be a shame. You're such fun. :-)

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well, if you aren't the funniest Hubber I don't know who is...oh, wait, you are the funniest Hubber. Well thank God that vote went correctly.

      Not only do we get to laugh when you write but we get to learn. It's like only having ten bucks at the race track and hitting the daily double....how cool is that?

      Yep, I enjoyed this one. LOL

      bill

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 4 years ago from Florida

      Very interesting....the only frog I am concerned about is the Bufo (Cane) frog that comes out at dusk. They are a menace to our pets because of their poison that is strong enough to kill a small dog. You may have seen these frogs where you live. I wrote a Hub about them.

      Voted UP, etc.etc. and shared.

    • The Frog Prince profile image

      The Frog Prince 4 years ago from Arlington, TX

      Now don't got picking on my brethren BJ.

    • Petra Vlah profile image

      Petra Vlah 4 years ago from Los Angeles

      Amazingly interesting as usual! Reading your intelligent, humorous and most knowledgeable hubs is one of the only reasons I am still on HP.