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What Are Horses Thankful For?

Updated on November 13, 2018
Ellison Hartley profile image

Ellison is a professional horse trainer and riding instructor. She runs a summer camp program and offers kids a safe introduction to horses.

Tiny is grateful for the end of pony ride season
Tiny is grateful for the end of pony ride season | Source

If A Horse Could Be Thankful

I wonder what they are thankful for? I know that this is probably unrealistic, seeing as horses don't have the ability to have the same thought processes as we do. It is fun to speculate though!

My horses are lesson horses, summer camp mounts and pony ride ponies. They work hard for most of the year and then their busy season winds down in the late fall and winter. Then picks up again in the springtime. I think my horses have a special set of things to be grateful for, that may be a little different than a horse that is just owned and ridden by one person.

Maybe they are grateful for color coordinated rider  and tack? Doubt it, though it is cute.
Maybe they are grateful for color coordinated rider and tack? Doubt it, though it is cute. | Source

Rainy Days

At our farm, with no indoor, on bad weather days, the horses don't have to work. They may have to stand in the cross ties and get groomed or do some part of an unmounted lesson, but they won't have to go out in the ring and go around and around in what I'm sure they see as mindless circles. I bet my horses do rain dances in the barn at night anytime they see rain clouds.

Rainy days mean days off and even a chance to roll in the mud to get filthy dirty. A horses favorite thing!
Rainy days mean days off and even a chance to roll in the mud to get filthy dirty. A horses favorite thing! | Source

Bit less Bridles

New riders can be hard on a horse's mouth, they don't mean to, but sometimes they kick and pull at the same time, and give conflicting signals. Some of my horses are well behaved enough that they can ride in a bitless bridle.

This means that they don't have to put up with a bit yanking around in their mouth. The bitless bridles my horses use are basically like rope halters with reins, making a much more pleasant ride for an inexperienced rider than a regular bridle with a bit in their mouth.

Horses appreciate their bit less bridles, as well as time outside the lesson program, as seen here. My old man Cory and I on a trail ride many moons ago. Best horse ever, may he rest in peace.
Horses appreciate their bit less bridles, as well as time outside the lesson program, as seen here. My old man Cory and I on a trail ride many moons ago. Best horse ever, may he rest in peace. | Source

Lesson Kids Love Feeding Treats

I think that my horses are also grateful for the fact that lesson kids love feeding horses treats. One of the first thing that the kids learn at the barn is where the treat jar is, and the horses ears perk up everytime that they see a kid headed in the direction of the feed room.

My lesson horses can always count on a treat after their lessons.
My lesson horses can always count on a treat after their lessons. | Source

Walk Around "The Trail"

Though at our farm the trail is just a perimeter loop around the property, the horses look forward to that time outside of the ring. A change of scenery as well as a chance to maybe try and sneak a mouthful or two of grass when their rider isn't paying attention

I would think they always welcome a change in scenery.
I would think they always welcome a change in scenery. | Source

Their Training And Good Manners

Since my horses are so well trained and mannerly, they are probably thankful for the fact that someone taught them to behave that way. That in its self is what landed them in a barn-like mine. A place where they will be used, loved and taken care of. They serve a purpose and will never have to worry about whether or not they will be properly cared for.

Without their training, good manners and gentle personalities who knows where they would be. Though they do work hard, they can be thankful that they are in a safe place where they are loved and cared for.

My horses gentle nature assures that they will always be safe and always have an important role to play in our program.
My horses gentle nature assures that they will always be safe and always have an important role to play in our program. | Source

Shelter And Turn Out Time

I think that my horses are grateful for their stalls and run in sheds so they can stay out of the weather. I think that they are also grateful for being able to be turned out and get muddy and dirty. Unlike some show horse who spend all their time standing in stalls.

They are grateful for the barn to get in out of the weather and then the paddocks to go out and run and get dirty in.
They are grateful for the barn to get in out of the weather and then the paddocks to go out and run and get dirty in. | Source

Who Knows What Horses Are Thankful For?

They probably aren't thankful for much of anything besides routine, food, water and shelter from the weather. They probably do like getting fed treats and getting days off when it rains.

Horses live in the moment, if we did the same thing, I think that we would spend a lot more time being thankful, grateful and appreciative. The horses only know how they feel in the present moment and are fully aware of their situations when they are in it. They live in the moment. Not thinking about the past, or worrying about the future.

Who knows what horses are thankful for? Or if they are even capable of being thankful. We can only speculate. I do know one thing for sure. That is that I'm grateful for my horses and all the lessons that they teach me. I can only hope that they too in their own way, even though they are just animals, have something to be thankful for this holiday season. Whatever it may be!

Who knows what horses are grateful for. Maybe they are grateful for us? Maybe not! All I know is that we should be thankful for them!
Who knows what horses are grateful for. Maybe they are grateful for us? Maybe not! All I know is that we should be thankful for them! | Source

Comments

Submit a Comment
  • Ellison Hartley profile imageAUTHOR

    Ellison Hartley 

    18 months ago from Maryland, USA

    Love that so true!

  • Ellison Hartley profile imageAUTHOR

    Ellison Hartley 

    18 months ago from Maryland, USA

    Steering and stopping, though most well-trained horses can learn to go in a bitless bridle, and appreciate it. Especially when the reins are in the hands of inexperienced riders.

  • DreamingBoomer profile image

    Karen Kay 

    18 months ago from Jackson, MS

    Love that bitless bridles are an option. I always wondered why they have to have those - from your article I presume it has something to do with steering?

  • Ellison Hartley profile imageAUTHOR

    Ellison Hartley 

    18 months ago from Maryland, USA

    Thank you for reading my article, I'm glad you enjoyed it!

  • ChristianWritings profile image

    Christian Writings 

    18 months ago

    This was such a cute article! I love horses, we have a few who live on a little farm down the street, and when we pass by them I get my kids to offer them fresh carrots (which they LOVE) I bet that the things you mentioned are indeed all the things they would be grateful for! :)

  • Rick Benningfield profile image

    Rick Benningfield 

    18 months ago from North Texas

    A horse is thankful for many things especially for the time that we spend with them and if we treat them right they are even thankful for that. they like time spent on them and for the brushing and care that we give them. I found out that they even like it when we talk to them and I do, just like I was talking to a person. When I did not have anything to say I even read to them from the Bible and they liked that!

    The horse likes the interaction that we can give, I always call them by name and personally talk to each and every one of them every day. I asked Pancho how he was doing and he raised his right front foot I spotted a rather large nail protruding from the sole so I told him to stay like that and I grabbed some pliers and removed the nail then washed out the hole with Betadine before placing the foot b ack on the ground. I then called the VET for a tetnus shot and to have him checked. He was alright! Remember to talk to your horses you never know when or if it will come in handy!

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