List of food to not give to a dog

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  1. Ari Lamstein profile image79
    Ari Lamsteinposted 6 years ago

    List of food to not give to a dog

    I have heard that you should not feed a dog chocolate, onions and garlic.  Are there any other foods that a dog shouldn't eat?

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  2. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
    Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years ago

    I just answered this question and it disappeared! I'll try to remember what I just wrote: avocodos, macademia nuts, raisins, currants, grapes, Xylitol (sweetener found in baked goods, human toothpaste, candy, gum, etc.), coffee, tea, alcohol, hops, perisimmons, raw eggs, bones (controversial, but at least avoid cooked bones because they can more easily splinter, poultry and fish bones), sugary foods, yeast dough, mushrooms, rhubarb leaves, fat trimmings and fatty foods such as french fries (can cause pancreatitis), chives, milk and milk products (although I give my dogs ice cream as a treat and they tolerate it just fine) - in addition to the things you mentioned.

    Some of these foods are more toxic than others and the toxicity depends on the amount consumed. For example, milk chocolate is not as toxic as baker's chocolate cue to the relative amount of theobromine contained in the chocolate.

    1. Ari Lamstein profile image79
      Ari Lamsteinposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Great answer!

    2. MickiS profile image80
      MickiSposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      That's an awesome answer!

    3. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you! Nice to get some positive feedback!

    4. Melissa A Smith profile image96
      Melissa A Smithposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I doubt raw eggs would even begin to cause problems unless you feed them extensively. The whole biotin issue is the same with humans. Does the tea refer to a specific type?

    5. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Raw egg whites contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin) which can cause skin and coat problems. The yolk contains biotin which MAY counteract this effect. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella. Any tea.

    6. Melissa A Smith profile image96
      Melissa A Smithposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      With a quick search I cannot find why non-caffeinated tea is not recommended. Many supplements I use contain green tea, and I'm reading a book on herbs for pets that recommends the use of teas (various herbs) extensively.

    7. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I don't know why you would want to give tea to a dog, even decaffeinated. I do not recall anything about tea from my pet nutrition classes but I would not give tea to a dog - I see no reason. It isn't something they would naturally consume.

    8. Melissa A Smith profile image96
      Melissa A Smithposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I've given my animals many things that they would never consume in the wild (medicinal herbs, bee pollen, coconut oil, seaweed, wheat grass) to cure illnesses. I will be writing future hubs about it.

    9. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      As a medical professional with an educational background in biological sciences, pet as well as human nutrition and canine biology I am cautious and ascribe to evidence-based practice.

    10. landscapeartist profile image74
      landscapeartistposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      What about the seeds of a pear?  I have a pear tree and my lab gets into them too.

    11. jandee profile image66
      jandeeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Cat food---dangerous

    12. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Apple seeds, pear seeds, apricot pits, peach pits, and plum pits all contain cyanide of varying amounts. Additionally the pits pose a possible choking and GI obstruction hazard.

  3. bamuscarella profile image77
    bamuscarellaposted 6 years ago

    Also the seeds of fruits ... for example, apple seeds contain cyanide.

    1. landscapeartist profile image74
      landscapeartistposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for telling us that.  I didn't know that. My dog always goes to the apple tree and eats up the apples.  I try to  stop him, and gather up the apples before he gets to them but he is quicker than me. I am going to be more careful this year.

    2. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The seeds need to be punctured for the cyanide to be released and your dog would have to consume a very large number of PUNCTURED seeds to cause a problem.

  4. Vasiliki Bouras profile image61
    Vasiliki Bourasposted 6 years ago

    1. Onions
    2. Garlic
    3. Raisins
    4. Grapes
    5. Chocolate
    6. Processed table/human food.
    7. Alcohol
    8. Sugar

    1. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      It is ok to give dogs "human" food. It is a common myth that there is such a thing as "human food" and dog food." One only needs to avoid the foods listed above.

    2. Vasiliki Bouras profile image61
      Vasiliki Bourasposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Processed human food is OK to give to dogs?

    3. jandee profile image66
      jandeeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Take garlic from your list-it is very helpful in problems with fleas. Do you count honey as sugar?

    4. Vasiliki Bouras profile image61
      Vasiliki Bourasposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Garlic for fleas? That makes sense! Good To Know! I think Honey is ok, I was thinking white refine sugar is probably not good for dogs.

    5. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Incorrect - many vets advise against the use of garlic. While it may be used as a natural flea/tick preventative, it has not been shown conclusively to be helpful and can be allergenic, irritating to the GI tract and toxic due the thiosulfate.

    6. Vasiliki Bouras profile image61
      Vasiliki Bourasposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Dubuquedogtrainer, I'm learning so much. I can see how Garlic would deter fleas, but dogs should not eat garlic...so it's probably best to just avoid it all together.

    7. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I give my dogs small amounts of sweetened foods - just this morning I gave them each a small taste of yogurt because I was eating some and had to give one of my dogs a pill in something so I used yogurt. Just beware of the Xylitol!

    8. Melissa A Smith profile image96
      Melissa A Smithposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      It also enhances the immune system (for people too). To be on the safe side, I wouldn't give a dog something without researching, but small amounts shouldn't be harmful, or if it's in a dog supplement.

    9. jandee profile image66
      jandeeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I would like to say that there are Two schools of thought on garlic !
      My Boxer dogs had garlic month on month off.  They were 16 when they left me-old age !
      My present Boxers have the same vitamins my other dogs had  such as Vit.E,Acidophilus,garlic.

    10. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image57
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      It is best not to supplement a dog's diet with additional nutrients, i.e., vitamins and minerals since a proper diet requires the correct amount in the right combination and proportion.  See my post above re garlic.

    11. jandee profile image66
      jandeeposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      With the exception of garlic....

  5. GardenWildRose profile image61
    GardenWildRoseposted 5 years ago

    Rawhide is a no no it comes off in chunks when it has been chewed on then gets stuck in the digestive track and swells up causing death in some dogs. Also no grapes they are posion to dogs...

  6. jandee profile image66
    jandeeposted 5 years ago

    Garlic is okay,apples are okay, your dog will sort out the pips.....

 
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