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10 Simple But Crucial WoodWorking Simple Tips - Don't Start Unless You've Read This

Updated on July 23, 2017

If you've ever looked at beautiful woodworking and wondered if you could do the same, you've come to the right place. This article is here to help you learn about woodworking. Use them to begin and improve your skills over time.

Tip 1: Cleanliness is Next to Godliness

Clean your saw's teeth before cutting lumber. To thoroughly clean your saw blade dip a shop rag into a little acetone and wipe the blade thoroughly. Additionally, using a piece of sandpaper that has a fine grit will remove any sap or gumminess from your skill saw's cutting blades.

Tip 2: Cheap is Good

When trying woodworking for the first time, opt for cheaper woods or even scrap woods. You are going to make mistakes along the way when you are first starting. Make sure you make those mistakes on wood that's easily replaceable. There's nothing worse than making a rookie mistake on a very expensive piece.

Tip 3: Safety First

Make sure your work area is safe, well-lit and organized. Working with woods is difficult work, and it is dangerous work when your work area is dim and there are safety hazards in the area. Make sure there are no spills, tripping hazards and other safety hazards that are a disaster waiting to happen.

Tip 4: Does it Fit?

Before you pull out the glue, make sure the pieces you want to glue fit together properly first. If you're trying to fix things up after you have glue on your piece, there is a chance that you're going to damage the project. Dry-fit will help you realize what goes where.

Tip 5: No Loose Objects

If you have any pockets on the shirt you are wearing, remove everything from them before you start working with a table saw. It is very common for objects like pens and rulers to fall from your pocket and get caught in the blade, which can lead to some pretty serious injuries.

Tip 6: Stay Sharp

Only cut using sharp tools. Older and dull tools result in tear-outs and even chipping, which is frustrating and a waste of time. Sharp tools means you get clean cuts quickly. You'll also spend a lot less time sanding things to get just the right look and fit that you need.

Tip 7: Can You Do It?

Carefully consider the skills necessary to complete a project before beginning. This is especially important for novice woodworkers. Many people think that building a dresser shouldn't be that difficult; however, they soon realize that they do not have the necessary skills to complete the project and give up before they even begin.

Tip 8: Learning is Everything

Take time to learn about the different types of wood and where they can be used. Each type of wood has its own benefits. For example, soft woods are generally cheaper; however, they tend to warp over time. Teak is a perfect wood for outdoor use; however, it is very expensive.

Tip 9: No Drinking Please

It goes without saying, you should always be sober when pursuing a woodworking project. Even one beer or glass of wine can interfere with your reaction time and your ability to make sound decisions. If you are using any medication, prescription or over the counter, be sure to heed safety instructions regarding the operation of power tools and machinery.

Tip 10: Get Feedback

Ask for feedback along the way when you're making something for other people. If you are creating a jewelry box, for example, make sure that you get a feel for how people are reacting to it before you're done. That way, the other person is happy and you can be proud of your work.

Now that you know more about woodworking, you should be confident enough to get started. If you stick with it and try a few new things every day, soon you will be making more and more intricate pieces with wood. Put the tips found in this piece to good use.

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