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How to Make Beautiful Stamps with Flowers

Updated on July 20, 2013
Marigold Print
Marigold Print

I am always looking for natural supplies to do my projects with.The less outside resources I have to use the better, mostly because it costs much less, and because it’s fun.It feels good to know that I took care of it myself and it is one less thing I have to rely on someone else to do for me.It may be small and doesn't directly translate into self sufficiency, but I think the mindset is what matters in the long run.

I do not have a huge family, but it is large enough that there are very few months with only two birthdays in them.I love to send birthday cards.So this means I either have to buy more than I can afford, or purchase bulk cheapies from the Dollar Store.I do buy cheapies from the Dollar Store for when I am really in a bind, or have nothing but girlie cards to send to the 16 year old male cousin.But it just doesn't feel right sending a generic card to someone I care enough to send a card to in the first place.

So I had to come up with better ways to tell them that they matter to me.I made some stamps out of zucchini and yellow squash earlier this year.In following that theme, I decided to try something else – flowers.Seems simple enough at first glance, but I decided to try it out before I set myself up to make 20 new cards and have them look horrible.

Miniature Rose
Miniature Rose
Marigold
Marigold
Miniature Mum
Miniature Mum

Tips to get You Started


1) Flat color was nice, but two colors blended gave more depth and a realistic feel. For example, marigolds are orange, but I only had primary colors. I didn't want to mix paint because I knew I wouldn't use half of it. So I mixed them on my brush, with the darker color under the lighter color.

2) Flatter, broader flowers worked better than taller, deeper flowers. Rose buds are too tall and narrow, but miniature double roses have a nice flat top to them. Marigolds and mums are good choices that open flat.




Rose Print
Rose Print
Marigold Print
Marigold Print

3) Flowers with ruffled petals seemed to work better than petals with curled edges. The ruffles seem to work well, much as a skirt with a lot of thick pleats has a lot of creases, there are plenty of small lines for the paint to lodge in. Roses didn't do too badly, however with the mostly smooth petal, there was not as much directional flow for the eye to follow. That made it a little more difficult to tell what the print was.


4) Adding in a stamp with the leaves from the plant really helped pull it all together.

5) Using a soft bristled brush versus a stiff bristled brush affected how the paint went on the petals.With the petals being so delicate, I opted for a softer brush.This instinct proved correct.The stiffer bristled caused there to be “drag” lines in the paint, which transferred to the print, distorting the picture.


Step Three
Step Three
Step Four
Step Four
Step Four and Five
Step Four and Five
Step Four and Five Continued
Step Four and Five Continued
Completed Stamp
Completed Stamp

Step by Step Instructions


Now that you have some ideas where to start here are some step by step instructions.

1) Have your area set up and ready to paint and stamp. Papers cut for cards, paints, paint brushes, water to rinse the brush, paper towels, and anything else you might find useful when you paint.

2) Choose your flowers and pick them, leaving a long enough stem, when possible, to comfortably hold the flower while painting.

3) Using your paint brush, lightly start brushing the paint onto the flower, from the inside to the outside. Do not worry about fully covering every petal; instead focus on covering the visible parts of the petal. Anything tucked under other petals won’t be used anyway.

4) Choose the area you want to stamp. Carefully place the center of the flower on the paper and with a gentle rocking motion, rock the in a circular pattern all the way around, taking care NOT to move the center of the flower.

5) As you are rocking the flower around, take care to gently press the outer petals down onto the paper so that they make full contact.

6) Carefully lift the flower straight up so as to not smudge the paint.

7) Clip off a few leaves from the flower; paint either the front or the back, depending on detail preference. The veins from the leaves show up in the stamp better when you paint the back. But if the leaves are very small, this extra detail might take away from the overall appearance.

8) Place the leaf close to the flower and starting from the inside, press your way outward making sure to not shift the leaf. If it is a stem of leaves, as in the marigold or rose, press only one leaf at a time, still working from the inside closest to the flower outward.


Now that you have the tips and steps you are ready to start your own creation. Enjoy!

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