ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Arranging Tulips

Updated on February 25, 2013

Choosing Your Tulips

The tulips should be closed tightly and their leaves should be green, strong and fresh looking - not yellow.

There are so many colors and types of tulips. I think they look fantastic when you mix and match the colors and textures, or fill a vase with one solid color.

I chose light pink, hot pink and white because those colors look great together, and are fantastic for Valentines, Easter and Mother's Day.

What You Will Need - Three bunches of Dutch Tulips, a short, somewhat wide vase, and clippers or a knife

type=text
type=text

Choosing Your Vase - I like a nice cylinder or pint glass shaped vase for my tulips

type=text
type=text

This vase is about 8 inches tall and 6 inches wide at the top.

Cleaning Your Tulips - These are the types of leaves that I remove.

type=text
type=text

Remove all the damaged and drooping leaves on your tulips by simply snapping them off the stem with your hands.

You want to keep as much greenery on the stem as possible to give your tulips the most natural look, so be careful not to take off too much.

How Many Leaves to Remove - This is how many leaves I removed from all three bunches.

type=text
type=text

Hopefully this gives you an idea of how many leaves I preserved.

I even left on some drooping leaves and I will arranged those flowers toward the inside of my arrangement so I have enough greenery in my vase and the arrangement doesn't look skimpy.

Getting Started With Your Arrangement - Arranging Your Tulips, a few at a Time

type=text
type=text

I chose the light pink bunch to work with first, because those stems were the shortest and they had enough leaves to start building a grid for the rest of the tulips.

I like to group 3 stems together, hold them up to the vase to determine the length to cut them, then give them a fresh cut with my clippers.

Groups of 3 or more of a single color give the arrangement a freshly gathered garden look and avoid an overyly deliberate looking mixed bouquet.

First Bunch Completed - You can see that I have 3 groups of 3 stems each and a pretty decent grid with the leaves.

type=text
type=text

Adding the Second Bunch of Tulips - I chose the Hot Pink next, because they had the least leaves and were the tallest.

type=text
type=text

My white tulips have a lot of greenery that would make it difficult for me to add the hot pink tulips in after without breaking stems.

However, the greenery on the white tulips will fill all the holes in the arrangement and adjust the final spacing of the other 2 bunches of tulips.

I also arrange the hot pink tulips in groups of 3 or 4

type=text
type=text

I place them in the spaces between the light pink tulips.

Don't worry if the arrangement doesn't look perfect, the white tulips with their shorter stems and strong greenery will pull everything together.

undefined
undefined

The Final Bunch of Tulips - Add them in one at a time to fill in all the gaps in the arrangement.

type=text
type=text

Try to group some of the white tulips together, to continue that freshly gathered garden look.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      othellos 4 years ago

      Really beautiful lens with lots of interesting content. Your guidance with pictures is very useful. Thank you for publishing it.

    • jlshernandez profile image

      jlshernandez 5 years ago

      Thanks for this tutorial on arranging tulips. It was certainly very useful which I will try doing the next time.