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Beading Culture

Updated on July 7, 2012
Brazillian Sunset; large African Amber focal point bead compllimented with Carneilan, wood and brass.
Brazillian Sunset; large African Amber focal point bead compllimented with Carneilan, wood and brass. | Source

 

Welcome to Beading Culture!

As an artist and author, I,ve always been intrigued by many different forms of artistic expression. Through my college years, I spent a great deal of time trying to decide where my heart was. I toggled between fashion design, fine art and graphic design for many years. Then one day, I wondered into a neighborhood bead shop and got lost in the beauty of beads and the variety of possibilities the craft offered. I became mesmerized by the intricate beauty of ancient jewelry and haven’t been able to dismiss it from my mind since. That was over fifteen years ago.

I've devoted most of my career to education and graphic arts, but found that I could not ignore the urge to create jewelry anymore. The result, Niema's Treasures (www.niemastreasures.com), a site showcasing my handmade creations inspired by cultural influences.

It’s my hope that this page provides inspiration and enjoyment for those who love beautiful jewelry as I do; even more for those who find themselves with a passion to create.

I've collected examples of beautiful beads and materials from the present and the past, while providing information about the origins of the craft and its effect on culture. You will also find informative links and resources about beadwork and references to help you with your own projects.

Thank you for your visit and please come back again soon!

photo:dharmashop.com
photo:dharmashop.com
photo:dharmashop.com
photo:dharmashop.com
photo:dharmashop.com
photo:dharmashop.com

Tibetan Beads

Tibetan Dzi Beads and Agate Dzi originated from Tibet and the Himalayan Mountains. Dzi is considered a supernatural gemstone talisman that holds magical powers. “It comes in different shapes and sizes and are dark colored agate beads etched with a number of eyes, heavenly patterns and auspicious symbols. The Dzi is originated from the land of mythical Buddhist lamas in Tibet and is said to posses protective, enhancing, curative and healing powers. It is also claimed to bring fantastic good fortune, prosperity, wealth and good health to the owner as well.”(tibetway.net)

I absolutely love Tibetan beads! The details are so beautiful! The textures, size and clarity of finely etched lines give them a unique appearance that can stand alone in a beading design. Most Tibetan beads and pendants tend to be rather expensive, but well worth it in beauty and mystery. Although there are a variety of Tibetan beads of made turquoise, amber, coral and shell they originated as an agate bead, “one of nature's precious gifts to mankind and has been well accepted as a stone that radiates good energy”. (tibetway.net)

source: http://www.tibetway.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=14&Itemid=9


photo: mineralminers.com
photo: mineralminers.com
photo: eee.uci.edu
photo: eee.uci.edu

Lapis Lazuli

I have so many favorites when it comes to semi-precious stones and lapis lazuli is one of them. It has such an interesting history and unique qualities. “Lapis lazuli is one of the oldest of all gems, with a history stretching back some 7000 years or more. The name Lapis Lazuli comes from the Persian word lazhward meaning blue, in allusion to its color. In ancient times, lapis lazuli was known as sapphirus, which is the name that we use today for the blue corundum variety sapphire.

Lapis Lazuli has been highly valued for many thousands of years. The most famous locality for fine quality lapis lazuli is the same ancient deposit high in the mountains of Afghanistan where it was originally mined at least 6000 years ago. Lapis lazuli was often made into jewelry, carvings, amulets and talismans which were believed to have occult powers. It was used by the ancient Egyptians in many religious ceremonies, and was often used as an inscription stone for various passages from the Book of the Dead.
Lapis lazuli was one of the stones in the 'Breastplate of Judgment' of Aaron, described in the Bible (Exodus: xxviii, 15-30).
Lapis lazuli was said to dispel melancholy and depression, and to cure recurring fevers. It was also said to impart ancient knowledge, and the wisdom to those who use it.” (mineralminers.com)

 

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