ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Teensy Weensy

Updated on August 20, 2014

Itty Bitty

I love tiny things! I spend a lot of time out in nature, looking at things, and I always pay attention to the details, and the little things. I am sharing a little bit of my collection with you. I have a VAST collection. How about that! A huge collection of tiny things! :) If you don't pay attention to the tiny things, you miss half the fun!

I hope that by the time you finish reading this Lens, you will have a greater appreciation for little things, and will deliberately notice them.

The photo on the left is the flower of the Thread Plant. This tiny flower is somewhere in the neighborhood of 1/4" long. But it has everything. Petals, a speck of nectar, pollen, and so forth. Although Arizona has bees, and some of them are pretty small, I doubt if they pollinate this plant. They're still too big. That's just my opinion, anyway. Although I found this flower in my yard, I never saw anyone visit it. My guess is that it is pollinated by ants.

Unless otherwise noted, all photos in this Lens are mine. The photo of the unborn baby is used with permission.

Moths, mostly

We get a lot of moths in the house. One of my favorite things to do is to take pictures of them. Most of them are pretty small. I have seen quite a few different kinds of moths in the computer room. Here are a few samples. And some other things I have found elsewhere.

Moth photos

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Plume MothOne of the antennas of the Plume Moth.Gematrid Moth. Notice the delicate green, and the screwdriver handle for size comparison.Gematrid Moth. A patterned one.Gematrid Moth with red body.Gematrid Moth. Variations on this pattern are common.Gematrid Moth. Yet another pattern. Sometimes I capture them to take their picture and then let them go.Same moth, closeup of the head and upper body. The details on these little guys are amazing!Gematrid Moth. Variation on an earlier pattern. Note the size of the weave of the chair.White-lined Sphinx Moth. These are larger, approaching the size of a small hummingbird. Not in my room. Taken by flash after dark.Eggs of the Atlas Moth. The Atlas Moth is too large for a Lens about tiny things. :)Antennae, head and upper body of an African Moon Moth. This moth is too large for this Lens, too!Antennae, head, and upper body of a male Atlas Moth.Butterfly egg. Diverging from moths a little...Tiny caterpillar. He's not very old. See the large leaf vein across the top. I don't know what kind this is.Eye of an Owl Butterfly. In the original photo, you can see individual scales.A different caterpillar. These are about 1/4 inch long. I don't know what kind this one is, either.
Plume Moth
Plume Moth
One of the antennas of the Plume Moth.
One of the antennas of the Plume Moth.
Gematrid Moth. Notice the delicate green, and the screwdriver handle for size comparison.
Gematrid Moth. Notice the delicate green, and the screwdriver handle for size comparison.
Gematrid Moth. A patterned one.
Gematrid Moth. A patterned one.
Gematrid Moth with red body.
Gematrid Moth with red body.
Gematrid Moth. Variations on this pattern are common.
Gematrid Moth. Variations on this pattern are common.
Gematrid Moth. Yet another pattern. Sometimes I capture them to take their picture and then let them go.
Gematrid Moth. Yet another pattern. Sometimes I capture them to take their picture and then let them go.
Same moth, closeup of the head and upper body. The details on these little guys are amazing!
Same moth, closeup of the head and upper body. The details on these little guys are amazing!
Gematrid Moth. Variation on an earlier pattern. Note the size of the weave of the chair.
Gematrid Moth. Variation on an earlier pattern. Note the size of the weave of the chair.
White-lined Sphinx Moth. These are larger, approaching the size of a small hummingbird. Not in my room. Taken by flash after dark.
White-lined Sphinx Moth. These are larger, approaching the size of a small hummingbird. Not in my room. Taken by flash after dark.
Eggs of the Atlas Moth. The Atlas Moth is too large for a Lens about tiny things. :)
Eggs of the Atlas Moth. The Atlas Moth is too large for a Lens about tiny things. :)
Antennae, head and upper body of an African Moon Moth. This moth is too large for this Lens, too!
Antennae, head and upper body of an African Moon Moth. This moth is too large for this Lens, too!
Antennae, head, and upper body of a male Atlas Moth.
Antennae, head, and upper body of a male Atlas Moth.
Butterfly egg. Diverging from moths a little...
Butterfly egg. Diverging from moths a little...
Tiny caterpillar. He's not very old. See the large leaf vein across the top. I don't know what kind this is.
Tiny caterpillar. He's not very old. See the large leaf vein across the top. I don't know what kind this is.
Eye of an Owl Butterfly. In the original photo, you can see individual scales.
Eye of an Owl Butterfly. In the original photo, you can see individual scales.
A different caterpillar. These are about 1/4 inch long. I don't know what kind this one is, either.
A different caterpillar. These are about 1/4 inch long. I don't know what kind this one is, either.

Flowers

Some tropical, some Sonoran Desert

And parts of flowers. These are all tiny flowers, not included in my Bellyflower Lens. I don't know what some of these are.

Flower photos

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Tropical. I don't know what kind.Just garden flowers. Little ones.Lantana. Grows in both tropical and desert climates. I like this flower because it's really a bunch of little flowers.Hibiscus. The flower is too big for this Lens, so I'm giving you only part of it.Pentas Star Flower. Tropical.Tropical.An Iris is too big for this Lens, so I give you part of one.Orchid.Another orchid.The third orchid.IrisA closer look at that Iris.Mammillaria cactus.Desert flower?Chaparral flower. Desert.Tumbleweed, aka Russian Thistle. I talk about eating this plant in my Tuna Fish Lens. The flower is a tiny fraction of an inch in size. Desert.Whitethorn Acacia. Used to make perfume. Desert.Arizona Lupine. Desert.Lyreleaf Jewelflower. Desert.Coulter's Lupine. Desert.Ironwood Tree flower. Desert.Buckwheat. A small plant at this altitude, and the flowers are so small, you almost can't see them, at least not unless you get on your belly. :)
Tropical. I don't know what kind.
Tropical. I don't know what kind.
Just garden flowers. Little ones.
Just garden flowers. Little ones.
Lantana. Grows in both tropical and desert climates. I like this flower because it's really a bunch of little flowers.
Lantana. Grows in both tropical and desert climates. I like this flower because it's really a bunch of little flowers.
Hibiscus. The flower is too big for this Lens, so I'm giving you only part of it.
Hibiscus. The flower is too big for this Lens, so I'm giving you only part of it.
Pentas Star Flower. Tropical.
Pentas Star Flower. Tropical.
Tropical.
Tropical.
An Iris is too big for this Lens, so I give you part of one.
An Iris is too big for this Lens, so I give you part of one.
Orchid.
Orchid.
Another orchid.
Another orchid.
The third orchid.
The third orchid.
Iris
Iris
A closer look at that Iris.
A closer look at that Iris.
Mammillaria cactus.
Mammillaria cactus.
Desert flower?
Desert flower?
Chaparral flower. Desert.
Chaparral flower. Desert.
Tumbleweed, aka Russian Thistle. I talk about eating this plant in my Tuna Fish Lens. The flower is a tiny fraction of an inch in size. Desert.
Tumbleweed, aka Russian Thistle. I talk about eating this plant in my Tuna Fish Lens. The flower is a tiny fraction of an inch in size. Desert.
Whitethorn Acacia. Used to make perfume. Desert.
Whitethorn Acacia. Used to make perfume. Desert.
Arizona Lupine. Desert.
Arizona Lupine. Desert.
Lyreleaf Jewelflower. Desert.
Lyreleaf Jewelflower. Desert.
Coulter's Lupine. Desert.
Coulter's Lupine. Desert.
Ironwood Tree flower. Desert.
Ironwood Tree flower. Desert.
Buckwheat. A small plant at this altitude, and the flowers are so small, you almost can't see them, at least not unless you get on your belly. :)
Buckwheat. A small plant at this altitude, and the flowers are so small, you almost can't see them, at least not unless you get on your belly. :)

Pros and Cons

If you haven't paid attention before now, did this Lens inspire you to start to notice teeny things?

Do you pay attention to tiny things?

Yes

Yes

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • mel-kav 4 years ago

      I am very much like you. I photograph tiny things also. I marvel over the complex detail on these tiny insects and flowers. I find great joy in exploring the wonders of nature. I love your photos - thanks for sharing. And I also love sharing my photos.

    • Birthday Wishes 4 years ago from Here

      Yes, I love it to watch at them.

    • chi kung 4 years ago

      I do pay attention to tiny things - if I have moths in the house definitely want to get rid of them as soon as possible!

    • lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      Sometimes I do, but not always. I had never thought of taking pictures of moths and appreciate that you did so.

    No

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      No comments yet.

      Odds and Ends

      Things that don't really fit in with other collections. A little of this and a bit of that. And as they say in an early reader, And some bread. But we're not making sandwiches here, so I won't worry about it.

      This and that

      Click thumbnail to view full-size
      Let's start off with something tasty. Wolfberry. It takes 30 or 40 to make a handful, I think, but they're medicinal, and they are a bit tart. Desert.Pine cone. Probably got this photo over by Patagonia Lake, but there are lots of other places I could have gotten it.Closeup of the same cone. Look how WOODEN the parts are! That has always intrigued me.Water drops on plants intrigue me, too. I got this photo back east.Another one from back east.Palo Verde tree on my property just after the rain stopped. Desert plant.Different Palo Verde, same location.
      Let's start off with something tasty. Wolfberry. It takes 30 or 40 to make a handful, I think, but they're medicinal, and they are a bit tart. Desert.
      Let's start off with something tasty. Wolfberry. It takes 30 or 40 to make a handful, I think, but they're medicinal, and they are a bit tart. Desert.
      Pine cone. Probably got this photo over by Patagonia Lake, but there are lots of other places I could have gotten it.
      Pine cone. Probably got this photo over by Patagonia Lake, but there are lots of other places I could have gotten it.
      Closeup of the same cone. Look how WOODEN the parts are! That has always intrigued me.
      Closeup of the same cone. Look how WOODEN the parts are! That has always intrigued me.
      Water drops on plants intrigue me, too. I got this photo back east.
      Water drops on plants intrigue me, too. I got this photo back east.
      Another one from back east.
      Another one from back east.
      Palo Verde tree on my property just after the rain stopped. Desert plant.
      Palo Verde tree on my property just after the rain stopped. Desert plant.
      Different Palo Verde, same location.
      Different Palo Verde, same location.

      How about some tiny critters?

      Insects, arachnids. All found in the Sonoran Desert.

      Creepy Crawlies - Some of them fly

      Click thumbnail to view full-size
      I don't remember what these are.Desert Firetails. Found by Montezuma's Well. Most dragonflies are too big for this Lens, so I'm sticking with damselflies, which are smaller.Gray Bird Grasshopper.Honeybee on New Mexican Thistle.Tarantula Hawk. These have a nasty sting. But they're sure pretty! Rule: you can get up close if you don't threaten, and wasps and bees wont sting.Honeybee on Prairie Clover.Never did figure out what this is. I've been looking for years.Ant Lion. In my house. They make cone shaped holes in the ground and lie in wait for an ant to slide down the hill, as youngsters.Orb Spider. Hard to determine the species of many of these. He was outside my house by the car.
      I don't remember what these are.
      I don't remember what these are.
      Desert Firetails. Found by Montezuma's Well. Most dragonflies are too big for this Lens, so I'm sticking with damselflies, which are smaller.
      Desert Firetails. Found by Montezuma's Well. Most dragonflies are too big for this Lens, so I'm sticking with damselflies, which are smaller.
      Gray Bird Grasshopper.
      Gray Bird Grasshopper.
      Honeybee on New Mexican Thistle.
      Honeybee on New Mexican Thistle.
      Tarantula Hawk. These have a nasty sting. But they're sure pretty! Rule: you can get up close if you don't threaten, and wasps and bees wont sting.
      Tarantula Hawk. These have a nasty sting. But they're sure pretty! Rule: you can get up close if you don't threaten, and wasps and bees wont sting.
      Honeybee on Prairie Clover.
      Honeybee on Prairie Clover.
      Never did figure out what this is. I've been looking for years.
      Never did figure out what this is. I've been looking for years.
      Ant Lion. In my house. They make cone shaped holes in the ground and lie in wait for an ant to slide down the hill, as youngsters.
      Ant Lion. In my house. They make cone shaped holes in the ground and lie in wait for an ant to slide down the hill, as youngsters.
      Orb Spider. Hard to determine the species of many of these. He was outside my house by the car.
      Orb Spider. Hard to determine the species of many of these. He was outside my house by the car.

      Unborn Baby

      This little baby is only about the size of the man's thumb. He has been growing for about four weeks. The mother had a tubal pregnancy, and they had to take the baby to save her life. At the time they took this picture, the baby was still very much alive. Notice that he or she has eyes and fingers. The baby also has brain waves and a heartbeat. The heart started beating at about 21 days, a full week earlier than this picture. The large dark area is the liver.

      We know that by the time the heart starts to beat, there are already brain waves. We know this even though we cannot detect them, because without brain impulses that co-ordinate the beating of each cell of the heart, it would fibrillate. The impulse that synchronizes the heart cells travels from the brain down the Vagus nerve to the heart.

      When a baby starts to grow, at the time that she starts to take shape, the first organ formed is called the Primitive Streak. This is the early spinal cord, and the brain grows in the future head at the same time. Then the neural network forms. This is the network of nerves that will be throughout the body. The network takes the shape of various organs, and the cells growing in the area become that type of cells because the nerves cause the cells to differentiate into different kinds of tissue. By the time the baby has such well defined organs as in this photo, the neural network and the new organs are already forming or formed. As one authority said, organs are pressed into service as soon as they exist.

      This baby will move around, as one doctor described it, inside the amniotic sac with a natural swimmer's stroke. If you prick him, he will try to withdraw from the pain of the prick.

      The photo is one of the most authenticated photos in medical science, winning first place in a competition of medical photographs. I don't remember who took it, although the credit is on the photo. I have permission to use it.

      Tiny Human, so beautiful

      Human beings are absolutely amazing!
      Human beings are absolutely amazing!

      Rufous Hummingbird

      I can't let you go without showing you a hummingbird. They are the smallest of birds. However, they are among the largest objects I show you in this Lens. However, just to make sure I keep it small, I chose the smallest species I have photographed. These little guys tend to be quiet, and if you can catch them sitting, you can usually get a good picture, because they will pose for you for a long time.

      One of each

      Click thumbnail to view full-size
      This is a male.And this is a female.
      This is a male.
      This is a male.
      And this is a female.
      And this is a female.

      Collecting Comments Here, Folks!

        0 of 8192 characters used
        Post Comment

        • mel-kav profile image

          mel-kav 4 years ago

          What a remarkable and awesome photo of that tiny baby - yet so very sad that he/she had no chance to live. I don't know how people can say that is not a living human being.

        • happy-birthday profile image

          Birthday Wishes 4 years ago from Here

          Wonderful lens!!! Thanks a lot for sharing!