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In your experience, MOST of the time, is the person who honked their horn the gu

  1. Laura Schneider profile image91
    Laura Schneiderposted 4 years ago

    In your experience, MOST of the time, is the person who honked their horn the guilty party?

    For example, someone nearly T-boned me on the road today with my elderly father and step-mother in the car--and that car had the audacity to honk at me for nearly hitting me, when it was the car who streaked across 4 lanes of traffic to get in the lane I was pulling to a stop in at a stoplight. Light turns green, HONK. (Nobdy was slow in the uptake--we were all moving ASAP. I turned left into my destination (using my turn signal) HONK--roars away. (Dude/dudess, control the road rage!)

    So, are honkers more often in the wrong (in your experience) than the ones honked at?

  2. jeffreymaskel profile image73
    jeffreymaskelposted 4 years ago

    I don't think so.  I'm not much for honking unless it is to warn someone they are coming into your lane or things like that.  I try to keep myself from honking it in pure anger. 

    In my opinion though it seems that it usually is the victim that is honking.   Although I myself had someone honk at me for their mistake.  I think this might have been the only time though.

    1. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I rarely honk, even at the guilty, so I appreciate your opinion! Usually I just troubleshoot and drive on--I lived in Chicago for a few years where it was dangerous to honk due to other drivers being armed and/or susceptible to road rage.

  3. Borsia profile image46
    Borsiaposted 4 years ago

    Ha ha ha you need to visit China! They honk their horns at least once every minute. It doesn't matter who is doing what they constantly honk. Of course the net result is that it means nothing because there is so seldom a real reason.
    One day we were on a highway with no cars in sight and no cross streets or anything else. My (then) wife was driving and she would hit the horn every 5 minutes or so. I asked her why she was doing it and she told me it was very important. When a Chinese looks at a new car the first thing they do is sit in it and honk the horn, I'm not kidding!
    When I lived in the States I would say no it was maybe 70 / 30 with the 30 being the offenders.
    The thing that fried me in the States was that even when you were honking and obviously in their path the fools would still keep coming.
    My dream was to build a car completely out of 1/2" steel so I could just let them hit me or not hit the brakes to avoid them.
    Drivers in the States have gotten so much worse than they were when I grew up.
    But you haven't really driven until you have driven in the 3rd world where nobody has a clue what things like lane markers are and stop signs and lights are considered mere suggestions.

    1. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hahaha, I've ridden in vehicles in a third world country, and I can SO picture what you are saying! Donkeys and camels and horses, and carriages, and pedestrians and bicyclists and cars--all over multi-lane freeway scrambles, horns and shouts....

    2. Borsia profile image46
      Borsiaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      The worst I've ever seen was in Panama but I understand that they have started enforcing some traffic laws and calmed down quite a bit.
      I was back in China last year and it's still crazy once you leave the big 3.

    3. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I hope that more countries start enforcing the traffice rules. They're very simple, anyway.

    4. Borsia profile image46
      Borsiaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Sadly few people anywhere realize that driving cooperatively is what is the safest and most efficient way to go, let alone the most relaxing.

    5. Laura Schneider profile image91
      Laura Schneiderposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Too true, Borsia. Too many people take it as a competition rather than simply a journey. Who knows, maybe the competitors are right? I prefer the quiet journey, however, without incident or honking on anyone's part.

 
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