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Five Good Reasons to Change Jobs

Updated on July 2, 2013

The current job market has not been terrible good for workers. Many people are thrilled just to have a job. Therefore, they are very reluctant to leave a sure thing for a new job. What are good reasons to change jobs in such an environment? Here are five reasons that workers might want to switch career paths.

To Make More Money

The biggest reason for changing jobs is for increased compensation. More than at any time in post-World War II American history, employers are cutting hours and compensation for hard-working employees. Many people have been laid off, and the salary workers who remained were forced to do more work for the same or less pay.

Big corporations like WalMart are notorious for keeping employees near minimum wage for a limited number of hours that just low enough to keep these workers from getting fringe benefits. While there is a debate over the societal cost of this strategy, the impact on the affected workers means that they are unable to get ahead financially.

Money is not everything, but it does take a certain amount of money to have a relatively comfortable life. Therefore, an offer of another job with a higher level of compensation has to be taken very seriously.

The Mexican Stock Exchange
The Mexican Stock Exchange | Source

To Get a New Boss

I've not had any overbearing bosses in my life, but it appears that I am in the minority. There are many micromanaging bosses out there that will criticize every little move that employees make. Some good employees wind up on the bad side of a boss and will have trouble from day one, regardless of how hard they work.

People who have these problems with their boss should seriously considered changing jobs. Even money might not be enough to be worth staying with an overbearing micro-manager.

For Advancement Possibilities

Some employees have reached what has been called the "glass ceiling." They have gone as far as they can possibly go in an organization. These people might not feel terribly fulfilled in the job that they have knowing that they have reached the top of their career arc.

A new career can sometimes lead to new possibilities. Going into another line of work might offer much more in terms of advancement. At times, it might even be worth it to take a job for less money in order to get ahead over the long term.

To Improve Work/Life Balance

Most people will have to decide whether they want to work to live or live to work because some companies think they own their employees. Of course, there is a freedom of choice when it comes to choosing and employer, but once an employee is in a job, it is sometimes difficult to switch. Many companies will put their employees on salary and then expect them to work 70, 80, or even more hours each week.

Working that much can have severely negative impact on family life. All work and no play can lead to stress and poor health. Working less and having a vacation can lead to better health and better family relations. Therefore, getting the opportunity to have more down time can be a great move.

What is the best reason to switch careers?

See results

To Get Better Fringe Benefits

Some employers will try to keep employee benefits at a minimum as noted in the comment about WalMart mentioned above. This means little in the way of vacation (the US averages the fewest number of vacation days in the industrialized world). It also means that healthcare is nonexistent.

Finding a job that offers days off and other benefits like insurance and retirement funds (be they traditional pensions or 401k plans) is something that most people dream of. Those who can find such a job just might find that it's a good idea to change career paths.

Getting a new job can be a scary proposition. Those who can change careers to benefit themselves should seriously consider it. Do you know of any other reasons why people should change jobs?

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    • cprice75 profile imageAUTHOR

      cprice75 

      5 years ago from USA

      Of course, more money might not be a good reason to change if your current job is a great work environment that allows for quite a bit of personal freedom. It can be a good reason, but it might not be.

    • cprice75 profile imageAUTHOR

      cprice75 

      5 years ago from USA

      Thanks! :)

    • iguidenetwork profile image

      iguidenetwork 

      5 years ago from Austin, TX

      I absolutely agree with all the reasons. There's nothing wrong if you say you want more money and income that's why you want to move to another job. If you have the experience and you think you are worth more than what your present company pays you, then you shouldn't hesitate to switch jobs. Thanks for posting. :)

    • phdast7 profile image

      Theresa Ast 

      5 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Congratulations! Good for you. Very happy that you have a full-time position. Hope all goes well. Theresa

    • cprice75 profile imageAUTHOR

      cprice75 

      5 years ago from USA

      I'm just starting at the college level full-time in August. I'm hoping to get a few years in and then retire fairly comfortably. We'll see how that works out. I think higher ed can be one of the jobs with the most freedom out there. You read what you want, write what you want, and then talk about what you want. Most people won't get rich, but it beats most jobs by a long shot.

    • phdast7 profile image

      Theresa Ast 

      5 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Good advice and direction. I know it is scary to change jobs, but sometimes it is the right thing to do. I have worked for the same company (a University) for 14 years: the money is average/crummy, hours can be long, but they are very flexible --like working from home, etc., good or bad bosses/deans (and I have had both) will supervise from a distance, large measure of autonomy about your office - schedule - classroom management style - choice of course materials, pretty good benefits.

      All these make staying in one place for 14 years (and I am anticipating 8 more before retirement) a good situation for me. Don't know that I could do 10+ years in a typical office or organization. I work really hard, the pay kind of sucks, but everything else is quite good and makes it worth it. Sorry for babbling. Great hub. Lots to think about. Sharing. Theresa

    • cprice75 profile imageAUTHOR

      cprice75 

      5 years ago from USA

      Thanks for visiting and the vote of support.

    • jabelufiroz profile image

      Firoz 

      5 years ago from India

      Good Reasons to Change Jobs. Voted up.

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