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PPV Advertising Explained

Updated on August 20, 2017

I have recently found out about an interesting way of advertising called PPV (Pay Per View, occasionally also called CPV, or Cost Per View). While this form of online marketing seems relatively popular in the black hat circles, and a ClickBank product called "Mass PPV Traffic" is all over the Google search results, it took me some time to find enough information and get a good idea of what PPV is, exactly.

PPV might sound similar to PPC (Pay Per Click), a kind of advertising which is best known for programs like AdWords. However, even though the ad targeting might work similarly, the traffic source couldn't be more different. AdWords and similar companies send visitors via sponsored links shown on search engine result pages. On the other hand, the traffic source of PPV is adware.

PPV Traffic Sources and How It Works

What is PPV marketing and how it's related to adware.

Let's talk about adware first. Simply put, these are program which automatically display various advertisements on your computer - usually in the form of a pop-up or a pop-under window. If you've ever had to fix a cluttered computer of a clueless relative who clicks "yes" on every install prompt they get while surfing the internet, you're probably familiar with the concept. But have you ever wondered who's behind all that unsolicited advertisement?

PPV companies allow affiliate marketers to show their ads on thousands of computers infected with their adware application. The advertiser can choose when their ad will be shown by targeting it by either URL or a keyword. Here's an example:

John Newb gets his PC infected with adware - either due to poor computer knowledge, or simply not being careful enough about what he's installing. John is a bit short on money, so he goes to Google and searches for "payday loans" - a popular and highly-spammed keyphrase. Unknown to him, a PPV marketer is targeting that keyword, so when J. N. makes the search, the adware program will automatically open a pop-up window with a targeted ad.

It is also possible to target PPV traffic by URL, so the hidden adware app will display an ad when a visitor goes to a certain website. Some marketers apparently use sneaky tricks, such as making the unsolicited pop-up window look like it came from the URL the user typed in.

Is PPV Advertising Legal?

The main difference between adware and spyware or viruses.

When I first learned about it, PPV marketing seemed like such a blackhat strategy I wasn't even sure whether it was legal. However, it turns out the adware applications which are used to drive Pay-Per-View traffic are not illegal, because the user agrees to install them himself. This is different from spyware, viruses and trojans which install themselves automatically without the user's knowledge.

Now you're probably wondering why would someone willingly install crap adware on their computers. The truth is, in most cases the victims have no idea they're doing it. Adware distribution companies employ various sneaky and creative tactics to trick visitors into installing their software.

For example, you might visit a site that asks you to install a "codec" or a "browser plugin" in order to view some interactive content like a free game or a movie. Alternatively, you might be installing a a program you actually want, but it offers a "special toolbar" or "free messaging software" as a bonus - and you click "Install" without reading the fine print.

The bottom line is, people install adware on their own free will. You know those EULA user agreements that you have to read and click OK to whenever you install something? Let's face it, no one ever reads those 10 pages worth of fine print. The adware companies can enter a clause not only about displaying advertisements, but also you having to sacrifice your firstborn son to them, and no one would probably notice.

PPV Company List and Advertising Specifics

List of the most popular PPV networks.

There are many companies and networks which offer PPV advertisement services. Here are some of the most popular ones:

Just so we're clear, I'm not being paid to advertise any of those, nor can I tell you which one is better and why.

A few PPV advertising basics.

Like the term "pay per view" suggests, you actually have to pay for every impression - even if the visitor does not click on your ad in the pop-up window. In fact, you should be prepared for the likelihood that most people will close or ignore the ad (show me a person who enjoys intrusive pop-ups). As a result, the cost per view is usually rather low (can be as low as 1 cent per hit), and so is the conversion rate. However, keep in mind that a lot of companies require a minimum deposit that can be anything from $50 to $1,000, or even more.

From what I gather, PPV works best when promoting CPA (Cost per Action) offers, such as lead capturing or zip code submits. It doesn't work as well for sales, since I imagine people won't be too eager to spend money due to a random ad. Keep in mind that a lot of affiliate networks like CJ do not allow PPV traffic and you could even get banned for sending it. Your best bet is a specialized CPA network, although some of these might be a bit difficult to get into.

I cannot in good conscience recommend one company or another as the best PPV network since I simply haven't tried them. You're welcome to share your own experience in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

What is Mass PPV Traffic?

The internet is full of "reviews" of this ClickBank product.

I think you should have a pretty good idea about what is PPV / CPV marketing and how it works by now. I've tried to write an unbiased overview because the internet is spammed with overhyped Clickbank products claiming to make you rich in days using the PPV advertising method. Speaking of which, there's this one particularly popular product called "Mass PPV Traffic" that I wanted to mention since I became curious about PPV after I saw an ad for it.

Like many other Clickbank products, Mass PPV Traffic attempts to make you cough up $77 for their e-course by using impressive earnings screenshots, glowing testimonials about how it changed someone's life and tempting "free bonuses if you buy right now". I won't go as far as call it a scam, but with all the fake "Mass PPV Traffic review" pages out there that are nothing but sales copies in disguise, I thought I'd at least explain what it actually is.

Mass PPV Traffic, by itself, will not make your rich nor send you any traffic. It's merely an ebook which explains what is PPV and offers some supposedly "secret" tips and tricks for building your list and making money with it. Should you buy it? I wouldn't. But if you are interested in trying PPV marketing and would rather pay $77 for all the information on a golden platter instead of searching Google for an hour or two, then go for it.

What Do the Recipients of PPV Advertising See

Watch what happens if you infect your PC with adware.

PPV Marketing Poll

What do you think of PPV marketing?

See results

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