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Postal Myths Debunked - Does the United States Postal Service Run on Taxpayer Money?

Updated on August 5, 2014
Mel Carriere profile image

Although many are mystified by his mysterious moniker, Mel Carriere is a San Diego mailman who writes about the mail, among other things.

Except for this strange propensity to fly kites in thunderstorms, first Postmaster Benjamin Franklin was actually an exceptionally intelligent individual.
Except for this strange propensity to fly kites in thunderstorms, first Postmaster Benjamin Franklin was actually an exceptionally intelligent individual. | Source

Preface - Ben Franklin, Polymath Postmaster

No, Polymath is not a course you had to repeat as a high school senior because you flunked it your junior year. Polymath is not a secondary education graduation requirement at all, but actually refers to an individual whose expertise and range of studies span a significant number of different fields. Many of our founding fathers, most significantly Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, were polymaths. These were men who were conversant in multiple languages, developed scientific theories, had an extensive knowledge of natural history, and were successful businessmen. In their spare time they invented practical devices that are still in use today. The period in which these illustrious polymath American forefathers lived was known as the "Enlightenment," and enlightened indeed were these philosopher politicians who served the nascent Republic as few have since.

Benjamin Franklin's polymath achievements are legendary. Along with being a brilliant author and printer he was also a skilled statesmen, a scientist who made notable discoveries in the field of electricity, and a noteworthy inventor who is credited for the discovery of the bifocal glasses I am wearing right now and the Franklin Stove that keeps your tootsies warm on chilly November nights when it's not quite cold enough to crank up the furnace yet. Franklin did all of these things in spite of a formal education that ended in the second grade. He never had to repeat "Polymath 101" because he never took it the first time.

Our early polymath leaders had a highly developed sense of civic duty, something sorely lacking today. The enlightenment was an age in which notable men believed they should put their knowledge and wealth to use to promote the good of the nations in which they lived, and Benjamin Franklin was no exception. After his "Poor Richard's Almanac" made him very rich at an early age he turned his attentions to public service. One of the many hats he wore in his devotion to the Republic he helped to create was that of the first Postmaster General of the United States.

When Ben wasn't busy invading the boudoirs of the older women he fancied and perhaps conducting illicit, illegal experiments on corpses he developed a remarkably efficient postal system that actually turned a profit, first for the British crown and then for the fledgling United States. Postal and Profit are two words not usually found in close conjunction to one another, but Ben was the first to manage this seldom repeated feat. The Founding Fathers like Ben believed strongly in a public postal service, so much so that they wrote it into the United States Constitution. Communication, of which mail delivery was a critical component, was intended to be guaranteed to all Americans, independent of the price gouging and fleecing that sometimes takes place when free market capitalism degenerates into the corrupt collusion and monopolization practices of modern corporate capitalism.

So what would our enlightened polymath philosopher Benjamin Franklin think about the hue and cry that spews forth from the mouths of those most definitely unenlightened politicians of today? What would his opinion be of the clarion call for the end of a public postal service and the privatization of America's mail - or in other words, the drive to put the people's correspondence at the mercy of the corporate cronies the politicians serve?

On the rare occasions that I actually find a hundred dollar bill in my pocket I take it out, unfold it, and ask Ben this question. Ben looks up at me thoughtfully like he wants to answer but he never does, so of course I dutifully hand the bill over to my wife and forget about it.

On the rare occasions that Ben finds his way into my wallet he looks a little peeved that I keep asking him questions he is no longer capable of answering.
On the rare occasions that Ben finds his way into my wallet he looks a little peeved that I keep asking him questions he is no longer capable of answering. | Source

Shamelessly Exploiting Postal Myths

So if the purpose of this article is to debunk the prevailing postal myth that the United States Postal Service is taxpayer funded, why have I digressed into a discussion of enlightenment philosopher and American hero Benjamin Franklin right off of the starting block?

I do this because it's important to remember that Ben Franklin was a capitalist, and a very successful one. The other Founding Fathers were also avowed advocates of free enterprise, and let us not forget that capitalism was a very revolutionary theory at that time that made the mercantilistic crowned heads that governed us quake in their silver buckled foxhunting boots. Capitalist philosopher Adam Smith was the Karl Marx of his era; his radical enlightenment ideas were very much en vogue among the people who framed our Constitution, and one of these was our first postmaster Ben Franklin. Even so, the capitalists who wrote the constitution also believed in a public postal service, believing it to be an essential component of the infrastructure of the growing nation. The Constitution's framers took great pains to guarantee this institution by including it specifically in Article 1, Section 8, Clause 7 of our founding document.

Nevertheless, modern American politicians sneakily go about trying to dismantle the postal service by pinning that ugly "socialist" name tag to it, even though the framers of the Constitution had never even heard of socialism. Therefore, denouncing them as dangerous "reds" is an act of audacity that even Darrell Issa and the rest of his anti-postal cronies would be beyond trying - maybe.

One insidious action that Issa and his ilk are not above doing is whatever is required to carry out the destruction of America's only constitutionally guaranteed civilian organization. Toward this end, they exploit and perpetuate myths about the Postal Service that strike a nerve with a taxpaying public struggling to pay for the disastrous effects of trillion dollar oversea's conflicts and a new health care program that has cut deeply into the pocketbooks of the middle class.

One of the pervading myths that has been ingrained deeply into the collective psyche of America is that their Postal Service is run upon the largess of the taxpayers. At times this incorrect notion fosters an altogether hostile attitude toward Ben Franklin's tried and true delivery service, and adds fuel to the fire for those anti-postal politicians who know darn well the postal service pays its own bills, but for their own nefarious purposes choose to let the myth persist in the minds of the voters.

Even though it's only a portrait, the disapproval of the first postmaster for this latest rendition tends to show through the painting 240 years later.
Even though it's only a portrait, the disapproval of the first postmaster for this latest rendition tends to show through the painting 240 years later. | Source

Postal Reorganization Act of 1970

If your memory goes back before 1970, as is the case with many of us who are getting long in the tooth, then your assumption that the Postal Service is taxpayer funded is understandable, because prior to the Postal Reorganization Act of 1970 the post office was indeed a line item on the federal budget. Before the 1970 Postal Reorganization Act Congress funded approximately 20 percent of the organization's operating expenses in order to keep it solvent.

Then in 1967 a Presidential Commission was formed to study ways to make the postal service a viable entity that was capable of operating as a business and sustaining itself entirely from its own operational income. The Commission concluded that the Postal Service should become a "self-supporting organization" in order to meet the demands of the growing economy and the expanding population.

The 1970 Postal Reorganization Act, signed into law by Richard Nixon on August 12, 1970 abolished the Post Office Department, which had actually merited cabinet rank up until that time. For the first 200 years of our nation's history Postmaster General was a highly coveted cabinet post and PMGs bumped elbows with presidents around the oval meeting table. This cabinet rank ended with the abolishing of the Post Office Department and the creation of the United States Postal Service; a corporate-like independent agency that had a legal monopoly on the delivery of mail in the United States. Congressional subsidies of the Postal Service were then eased out over the next 15 years and since that time the USPS has been self sustaining, except for minor subsidies for mail for the blind and for overseas mail ballots.

It is likely that Ben would get a jolt when if he knew about the shameless raids made by Congress upon postal operating funds.
It is likely that Ben would get a jolt when if he knew about the shameless raids made by Congress upon postal operating funds. | Source

So who is Stealing from whom?

In spite of the Postal Service's post 1970 "independent" budgetary status, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) view the USPS as a veritable magic goose that craps out golden eggs at periodic intervals for lawmakers to lug down the Congressional beanstalk to their pork barrel patrons.

To cite an example from recent history, in 2003 the Office of Personnel Management reported that the United States Postal Service would overpay its retirement obligations by 71 billion dollars. Congressmen began salivating profusely as they pondered this prospective windfall, and immediately passed the Postal Civil Service System Funding Reform Act. The estimated 3.1 billion retirement plan savings produced by this law were to be held in escrow and reserved for future use as determined by Congress. Translation: through this law Congress was given the power to legally drain the postal coffers of any paper surpluses.

The same act also made the Postal Service responsible for paying its employees' retirement benefits for time spent in prior military service. This took the financial burden away from Congress for certain veteran's benefits and put it on the back of the post office; effectively eliminating the 3.1 billion estimated retirement savings and eliminating any postal budget surplus for the ten year window mandated by the 2003 Civil Service Reform Act. As a consequence, stamp prices had to be raised from 37 to 39 cents. Postal customers certainly pissed and moaned again about what a woefully inefficient organization the post office is, when in reality it was Congressionally mandated theft that made that particular rate increase necessary.

By 2006 the Postal Service had still managed to accumulate 326 billion dollars in assets in its pension fund; which amounted to being 91% prefunded to pay out retiree benefits. When this is compared to 42 percent prefunding for the average government agency and 80% for Fortune 500 companies, it makes one wonder why "USPS retirement shortfalls" are always used as a rallying cry for politicians who wish to dip their gluttonous fingers into the postal cookie jar.

Probably the most brazen deed of shameless postal looting was the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act of 2006, a piece of legislation that required the Postal Service to prefund its retirement obligations for the next 75 years by paying 5.5 billion dollars annually into the Postal Service Retiree Health Benefits fund,which I already mentioned was about 90 percent funded at the time. In addition, the 2006 PAEA law required the postal service to stop using its savings to pay down its debts, a ridiculously onerous stipulation that could never be legally required of any other business entity. Is it any wonder then that the Postal Service immediately went into a financial tailspin in which it remains almost hopelessly mired, even though its income from operations exceeded costs in 2013 and it would have been profitable if not for the unprecedented burdens imposed upon it by the PAEA?

It causes a bit of head scratching to ponder what the ultimate purpose is of requiring a company that already has an almost fully funded retirement system to pay an additional 5.5 billion annually into that fund. You can bet the Congressional postal pantie raiders are licking their chops right now, figuring out what devious means they are going to use to sneak through the second story window and abscond away by night with these so-called "retiree" benefits.

It doesn't stop there. The latest plot to loot the Postal treasury came in the form of a plan by certain seedy members of Congress to refill the nearly empty highway trust fund with the 2.1 billion surplus that will supposedly burst forth from the postal treasure chest when Saturday delivery is eliminated. Luckily this proposal was shot down before it got off the launching pad, but most certainly we can expect to see more underhanded efforts like this.

Just how many countless rolls of Benjamins have been looted from the postal coffers?
Just how many countless rolls of Benjamins have been looted from the postal coffers? | Source

Adjunct Myth - "Private Enterprise" will do the job more Efficiently?

So I think I have demonstrated that the postal service is not funded by the taxpayers, but instead is often used as a source of cash to inject into the dollar bleeding general fund. But the facts never stop Congressional allies of the Postal Service's competitors from using the economic woes they have forced upon the USPS as an argument for "privatization" of mail delivery, crying out that "private enterprise" can most certainly do a better job with the people's mail.

It actually makes me laugh when people refer to the postal service's competitors, most notably UPS and FedEx, as "private enterprise." UPS and FedEx actually only believe in private enterprise when it is convenient for them to do so, such as when the concept allows them to set their own shipping rates (without Congressional approval) to boost the bottom line and fly their own fleets of aircraft for greater efficiency. At all other times they act decidedly contrary to the spirit of free competition by leaning on allies in Congress to pass laws that would kill the USPS if left unchecked.

As an example, the United States Postal Service was actually prohibited by Congressional shakedown to lower its prices on overnight Express Mail when UPS and FedEx cried foul. More recently, these two major shippers have called upon lawmakers to prevent the USPS from lowering prices on parcel delivery, claiming that the Postal Service uses its monopoly on first class mail to subsidize these price reductions. In raising up this latest anti-postal outcry UPS and FedEx neglect to mention that they do not have their operating funds looted of 5.5 billion annually like the Postal Service does, something that most certainly offsets and reverses the first class mail advantage.

I remember from High School Econ 101 that price competition is one of the key features of a free market economy, but postal competitors UPS and FedEx are busy rewriting Adam Smith's doctrines to conform to their own version of corporate crony oligarchical capitalism at the expense of the low priced mail delivery that is guaranteed by the Constitution.

Is the illustrious first postmaster rolling over in his tomb?
Is the illustrious first postmaster rolling over in his tomb? | Source

Conclusion

Our founding fathers, such as Polymath Benjamin Franklin, specifically intended for the Postal Service to be an entity of the Federal Government. As such, they probably would not have approved of the abolishing of the Post Office Department and the creation of the United States Postal Service that occurred with the Postal Reorganization Act of 1970. All the same, for the most part the Postal Service has functioned quite well in its "independent" status, except in those cases where Congress has not allowed it to function independently through using its own revenues to sustain its own business operations, as any truly independent business could expect to do.

Instead we have this strange hybrid two-headed Postal entity that would most assuredly make poor Ben Franklin flop around restlessly in his grave in horror if he could somehow lay eyes upon it. America's post office has fallen into the hands of highly unscrupulous men, none of them Polymaths like our enlightened Ben, and it is up to Americans as voters to ensure that these agents of greed do not destroy what belongs to Americans by the highest law of the land.

Privatization of the Postal Service?

Should the United States Postal Service be taken over by private industry?

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    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 2 years ago from San Diego California

      You are absolutely right Gabriela. Inflexible behemoth, but we set a record for package delivery in December. Thanks for reading.

    • profile image

      Gabriela 2 years ago

      about the USPS being a bone headed ixnfelible behemoth, but I dare say that you'll play heck getting a small package across the country for $5.15 anywhere else. If they go out, we'll all be damn sorry.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 2 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you kenneth avery. Sorry it took me so long to respond. I appreciate you reading with an open mind.

    • kenneth avery profile image

      Kenneth Avery 2 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama

      Mel,

      A little? Hey, your hub was chocked full of great info. Keep up the great work. I like stories that expose facts that we have never discovered.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 2 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Kenneth Avery I really appreciate the nice words and I hope I have been able to inform you a little.

    • kenneth avery profile image

      Kenneth Avery 2 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama

      Mel,

      Great hub. Wonderfully-written and presented. Voted up and all the way. Keep up the fine work for you are a very talented writer.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Walter Poon. I am so glad to see you here as you were one of my first friends on Hub Pages. You are right, there are crooks enriching themselves at the public expense in every country. Thanks for dropping in!

    • WalterPoon profile image

      Poon Poi Ming 3 years ago from Malaysia

      QUOTE: "Luckily this proposal was shot down before it got off the launching pad, but most certainly we can expect to see more underhanded efforts like this."

      Sounds so familiar!!! It happens in my country, and I didn't know it would happen in America too!!! Mahathir Mohamad tried to project himself as the foremost defender of the Malay race and look what happens? He did not manage to achieve the 20-year New Economic Policy (1971-1990) target for the Malay race, despite being Prime Minister for 22 years and despite the NEP having run for half the duration before he became Prime Minister. But his son is today the 8th richest man in Malaysia (according to Forbes, based only on what is known of his wealth, which could just be the tip of the iceberg). Seems like robbers are masquerading themselves as public service advocates and public servants.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      In this case private industry would not serve the American people except to pick the public's pocket. Thanks so much for reading and commenting.

    • cecileportilla profile image

      Cecile Portilla 3 years ago from West Orange, New Jersey

      Well written article Mel Carriere. Thank you for the clarifications. Let us pray that the post service does not get taken over by private industry.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      I think you are right Deb. I think the less time our representatives spend in the Washington cesspool the better, and I think term limits would help to bring power back to the people. Thanks for dropping in!

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Someone always gets involved and tears away at what original organizations intentions were. This always leads to trouble within the ranks and consternation and misinterpretation by many. Perhaps if we vote into office those that have no political experience things will improve. As always, well done and very educational.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Perhaps Stalin thought he understood blind brutal ambition because he had been there done that and in so doing thought he could predict Hitlers actions.

    • kalinin1158 profile image

      Lana ZK 3 years ago from California

      Well, the Fuhrer's power of persuasion must have been really spectacular because it seems that Stalin didn't trust anyone in the world but Hitler :-)

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      You make an interesting point, but perhaps Stalin was such a logical individual that he couldn't believe another supposedly logical individual such as Hitler would really want to fight a two front war. It's also possible that he trusted the British spies that warned him less than he trusted Hitler, because Britain's relationship with Russia was less than rosy. I still think he was crazy like a fox and remember what Kurt Cobain said - just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not after you. Thanks for the great comment!

    • kalinin1158 profile image

      Lana ZK 3 years ago from California

      Alas, if only elections were a legitimate way the will of the people is served and not an illusion that camouflages the fact that nobody gives a flying duck about the will of the people!

      I'll be honest with you Mel, I'm so cynical, I don't believe in democratic elections at all. Everything is bought and sold in this country, including votes, and whoever has the best political campaign (i.e. whoever has the most money to have the best campaign) wins, and that's that. I don't know who votes guys like GW Bush in, I mean I know some people do, but ultimately, neither the tea baggers nor the tree huggers decide who gets in or who goes out. So unless Ben Franklin (or any one of those polymaths) decides to come back to life, we are at the mercy of the agents of greed, until ... something really changes and the whole system collapses on itself.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Dana Tate I haven't carried around old Ben in my wallet for a long time either. I am glad I could inform. Thanks for reading!

    • Dana Tate profile image

      Dana Tate 3 years ago from LOS ANGELES

      It's been so long since I had $100.00 bills I forgot what they look like. No seriously, loved the article Mel, I can always count on you to keep me informed when it comes to mail service.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      I have heard about this proposal Jaye and letter carriers support it. I think we used to have postal banking in the past and it was very popular. Of course the enemies of the Postal Service will be opposed to it and for this reason I don't know if it will fly because the anti-postal people are firmly entrenched in both houses. Might be another hub idea. Thanks for stopping back by!

    • JayeWisdom profile image

      Jaye Denman 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

      Mel - I read this morning about a PEW survey showing that a large percentage of Americans would welcome limited 'banking' availability in the USPS branches. Do you think this will happen and, if it does, will it help the USPS as well as customers? Would like your take on this idea. Jaye

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      You are absolutely right. We seem to be bouncing back in spite of Donahoe, not because of him. He is the crony of the man, George Bush, who put him in that chair. Thanks for reading!

    • profile image

      Frank 3 years ago

      you couldn't have hit the nail more squarely on the head..problem is our own USPS management from Donohue on down is sold out to these forces as well.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      I think the problems with the US Postal Service are applicable to postal services everywhere. The public is duped into thinking that privatization is the answer and then prices go up and service goes down. Thanks for the great comment!

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for creating a very informative hub, Mel. I always learn a lot from your articles. I appreciated the history lesson as well as the discussion of current problems in the post office.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      I am glad I could educate you grand old lady. Benjamin Feanklin was a remarkable self made man from the working classes who made himself into a man who the mere mention of his name made the crowned heads of Europe shake. Thanks for dropping in!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Kevin for the nice words and the share. Yes I realize the financial part is a little convoluted, but the point is that the Postal Service is not a drain on the American taxpayer, but actually becomes a slush fund for crooked politicians.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      ShielaMyers I wouldn't want to make you do something you regret. The government always wants to pretend like they want nothing to do with the post office until they want money to fund some pork project. Glad I could educate a little and you should be angry but you can relieve that angst by writing a Congressman or two. Thanks for dropping in!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you DrBill. I'm not even a polymath in my dreams but I'm pretty good at doing numbers in my head. Thanks for dropping in!

    • grand old lady profile image

      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 3 years ago from Philippines

      The history lesson was nice. I didn't know that Benjamin Franklin became a millionaire because of Poor Richard's Almanac! The info about the US post office was revealing. I always thought it was a government enterprise. Instead, it's private and it is supporting the government with part of its earnings. Quite an eye opener!

    • DrBill-WmL-Smith profile image

      William Leverne Smith 3 years ago from Hollister, MO

      What fun! I'm a bit of a polymath, and didn't even know it. Thanks for sharing the history on the postal system. More should be this aware! ;-)

    • The Examiner-1 profile image

      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      This was interesting Mel, it kept me intrigued, and even though I did not understand everything, I read each word. I feel for you and all the postal workers. Now I know why the price of stamps keeps rising too. I also learned a new word (polymath). I voted this up, shared and pinned it. Others should read it.

      Kevin

    • profile image

      sheilamyers 3 years ago

      Thanks for sharing all of this great information. I didn't know most of it. It's a good thing the government doesn't have full control over the post office or it would no longer exists because of their incompetence. What I still don't get is how the government can have so much control over a private business. They should have no say over how the post office is run unless the post office starts doing something illegal. It's just like any other business, right? I'm so angry right now just thinking about it I'm going to stop my comment before I say some really nasty things.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you very much!

    • Solaras profile image

      Solaras 3 years ago

      Please do share my words with them. They are great!!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Kaili Bisson a lot of countries such as Great Britain are going toward complete postal privatization and finding that service is actually worse under the corporate model. I actually think that the US system is best because as a business we have to compete and that keeps us from becoming a sluggish, bloated bureaucracy. Thanks for the great comment!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Solaras I am glad you appreciate the USPS. If you don't mind I would like to share your words with my fellow letter carriers on Facebook because I know they will be pleased by your words. I'll put the link to your HP profile in their too. Thanks for the great comment!

    • Kaili Bisson profile image

      Kaili Bisson 3 years ago from Canada

      Mel this is great. In Canada we have a real mess of a postal system too. Postage costs are way up and "service" cuts are the way a bloated Canada Post addresses their problems. Amazing how one can have a monopoly and still lose money hand over fist! Voted up and more.

    • Solaras profile image

      Solaras 3 years ago

      Awesome Article! I love the USPS, I use them for shipping small parcels across the country with their Priority Mail flat rate shipping. It is 1/4 the price of Fedex or UPS. They are reliable, the staff is polite and Saturday counts as a business day when delivering parcels and letters.

      Small business America runs on the USPS. Privatizing it would put many small business owners out of business.

      It is clear that they want to privatize it so that they can cry bankruptcy and discharge the USPS retirement fund obligations in order to raid those funds, and give them to the shareholders.

      Thumbs up across the board - even funny too! Shared

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Eric Sir - keep your computer unplugged (except for hub pages of course) and keep cranking out those letters. I appreciate the visit!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      I am so inspired I am writing two letters today to be sent out postal. Really cool hub dude.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you for the nice words and for taking the time to drop by DDE. I always look forward to your visits.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Always an interesting hub from you. The way you think and write amazes me. Voted up and useful.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you very much Miz Bejabbers for your very kind words. I think more and more people like you are understanding the truth about the USPS and realizing that its survival is definitely in their best interests. Thanks for spreading the word!

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 3 years ago

      Thank you for busting some post office myths. My first husband was constantly harping about how private enterprise could deliver the mail more efficiently and at a much lower cost. If so, why do I use the USPS for my packages more often than not? I will definitely share this one.

      I really admire your writing style. You get the point across efficiently with a little humor added. Voted up++ and shared.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Old Poolman, your suggestion inspired this but it certainly required a lot of research! I wish that a lot of Americans like you would adjust their thinking somewhat on the Postal Service because putting mail in the hands of the likes of FedEx and UPS certainly would not be in their best interests. Thanks again for the idea and the great comment!

    • profile image

      Old Poolman 3 years ago

      Mel - Thanks for addressing this myth, except that now I will have reprogram my brain with these new facts.

      It would appear that UPS and FedEx have been able to buy themselves a few powerful politicians. After reading your hub, it is amazing the USPS is even able to continue serving their customers.

      I had to vote this one UP and everything but funny. You did us all a favor by providing us with the truth.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Jaye for your very wise and encouraging words and I appreciate you spreading the word. People must realize that if UPS and FedEx take over door to door delivery postage rates will most certainly skyrocket. Thanks for dropping in!

    • JayeWisdom profile image

      Jaye Denman 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

      Mel - Great hub! The history lesson about Franklin was a bonus, but the strong message that the self-funded USPS is under continuing assault by the federal government should be read by as many people as possible. I, for one, will share it. You're right that Ben Franklin would be appalled at the governmental theft from the USPS coffers, not to mention the shakedown and preferential treatment of UPS and FedEx, neither of which provides anywhere near the quality of service that the USPS does.

      However, I often think that all of the early statesmen of this country must be 'flopping around in their graves' at the liberties taken with the Constitution and the Bill of Rights these days.

      Voted Up+++ and shared

      Jaye

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Why thank you sir. I wish I could think of some brain candy topics that didn't require so much research, because writing these sorts of things bogs me down for a couple weeks sometimes. Anyhow your compliments mean a lot and I appreciate you being the first to stop by.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are such a good writer. You not only deliver the goods, excuse the pun, but you do it with wit while tossing in a little history along the way. Very nicely written, Mel, a pleasure to read.