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What it Takes for Women to Rise

Updated on November 18, 2014

Women Rising: The Unseen Barriers is an in depth look at the challenges women face in the quest for leadership. Women need to be able to view themselves as leaders before taking the helm. This article delves into some of the issues women face at work regarding leadership roles and is must read.

Becoming a Leader

In the section Becoming a Leader, they speak of a character named Amanda, who is in her thirties with a hedging career in investment banking going nowhere fast. Two CFO’s decide to strategize and give her a career boost allowing her to clearly envision herself as leadership material.

Source

In order to rise as a leader; it is necessary to internalize the position of leadership. It may sound a bit aggressive and slightly uncomfortable, but this is exactly how it’s supposed to feel. This article is directed at women rising in leadership positions and encourages women to work a little harder amongst men to make this happen.

Internalizing new strategies will help one gain new ground. Others will take notice, realize your potential, and see you in a way they never saw you before. Authoritative positions require a sense of self not uncommon to what some may call, marking one’s territory. The statement at the end of the article describes Amanda as shedding her skin. Acquiring new skills is meant to highlight the process behind the idea of the transformative leader. As women, we need to transform ourselves, try new behaviors, be strong, and speak our minds in situations with our staff, that we had not in the past. Be demonstrative, step up to the plate, make staff see you in a new light.

Even though she was nervous and somewhat fearful in the beginning, she was able to see herself finally as the two CFO women had seen her, and her staff eventually saw her that way too. Her staff gained new respect and began to take notice. There are many ways of achieving this and in Amanda’s case she happened to have mentors that planted positive information about her in a way that “raised her profile.” As her team began to appreciate her ideas, Amanda started to have more respect for herself.

“These relationships, both internal and external, gave Amanda the confidence boost she needed.” It sounds almost subliminal, but people will follow and listen to important people, it’s just human nature. Great article.

Source

References

Ibarra, H., Ely, R., & Kolb, D. (2013, September). Women Rising: The Unseen Barriers. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved from https://hbr.org/2013/09/women-rising-the-unseen-barriers/

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    • Social Minds profile image
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      Donna S 3 years ago from Southern California

      Ok, I understand now. You are referring to women power tripping in a position of authority. Yes, I do believe this happens and is common. Some women don't know how to handle the position of leadership with grace and can come off hostile. Possibly they feel they won't be taken seriously and need to be more stern that necessary. However, there is a fine line, because if those same actions were done by a man, one might see it as a man just doing his job : /

    • Matty2014 profile image

      Matty2014 3 years ago

      Well, it is possible, I studied in all male high school, and I went to the all female high school for some courses, I found that their female teachers were much harsher to the girls than our teachers (both male and female) to us, and most of their teachers are female. But I am not sure if every female school are like that. (I am not American, so our education might be different.)

      and I did not referring to only one person, but quiet a few people including my female professor and my mum (who is a businesswoman), they often have negative views on female bosses, calling them like crazy, virgin, need a boyfriend and stuffs like that. maybe it is gender stereotype thing?

    • Social Minds profile image
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      Donna S 3 years ago from Southern California

      Hmmm, that's any interesting observation Matty and I would add to it if I had something pertinant to say regarding the matter, but not sure I'm able to comment on that one. I've had both women and men as bosses and I'm in a field that is predominantly women, so I've seen both sexes be able to tackle the job equally well and receive respect for it as well. The issue you refer to is a personal one that each person would have to evaluate for themselves. Possibly a bad experience in their past?

    • Matty2014 profile image

      Matty2014 3 years ago

      many women are breaking the gender stereotypes and be strong and independent, but I found that there has quite among of women dislike another women to be their boss and hoping for a male boss, I wonder why women dislike female in general? I never have a long term job, so I cannot study them closely.

    • Social Minds profile image
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      Donna S 3 years ago from Southern California

      Thanks billybuc for taking the time to stop by and read!

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Great topic...I was left wanting more....of your writing and more women rising. :)

    • Social Minds profile image
      Author

      Donna S 3 years ago from Southern California

      Interesting you said that. I went to a seminar on the Law of Attraction not too long ago!

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      Some of your statements remind me of the law of attraction. Yes, it can be done. Good advice!

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