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Online Magazines vs Personal Blogs

Updated on October 5, 2016
Marcy Goodfleisch profile image

A professional career coach, Marcy has helped hundreds refine their resumes, improve their interviewing skills, and advance their careers.

How to Write for Online Magazines

These tips will help you sell articles to online publishers.
These tips will help you sell articles to online publishers. | Source

Writing for Online Magazines

Many people figure writing is writing, and if it's online, then it must be a blog. Right?

Wrong. online magazines have specific guidelines about content quality, and any article written like a blog or a personal journal entry is not likely to be published. This also goes for sites (such as HubPages) that host various writers who produce informational pieces.

But for new writers, it can be difficult to understand the difference in style.

Here are some examples of the contrast in style between bonafide informational articles and blogs.

Naturally, this doesn't include all the ways the two differ, but the samples given here may help clarify things for those who are confused about the difference between a blog and a hub.

Contrast in Writing Styles Between a Blog and an Informational Article

Source
Source

Rather than telling the reader how you felt, help the reader personally experience those feelings

Suppose you write about your recent trip to the Vietnam Memorial in Washington D.C., which was a tremendously moving experience for you. Because emotions are involved, you may be vulnerable to the pitfall of simply expressing how you felt (which is often how a blog is written) rather than describing the experience in a moving way that will touch the emotions of the reader.

(Disclaimer: My dad was not in Vietnam and I have not taken my children to the Wall, but I have seen it myself. I am simply using this mock scenario as a way to show the contrast in writing styles. The descriptions and scenes mentioned here are similar to those I experienced while visiting the Wall at various times.)

Using this example, here are two ways you could write about the experience. One is better suited for a blog or a journal, and the other would be more appropriate for HubPages:

Spring Break Trip to the Vietnam Memorial (Blog Style):

Today we're going to talk about our recent trip to the Vietnam Memorial. I was so excited to go there, because my dad talked about his Army days there and I finally got to go see it on Spring Break because that's where we took the kids this year. They have heard their Grandpa talk about it many times, so I knew they would relate to it.

This monument is awesome! I had to cry when I saw the thousands and thousands of names on this wall because I know they are all somebody's son or husband or something. This monument is really different because it sort of goes underground and it doesn't have statues of people or anything.

This was one of the most moving experiences I have ever had and my kids liked it, too. I could see that they were touched by everything there and they said they were glad they got to see it. In particular, they remember seeing a sad man there and you could tell he knew someone on the wall. I absolutely recommend this as a good trip for Spring Break because it shows your kids what a bad war that was. My dad still talks about his time in Vietnam and sometimes it makes him break down in tears. Every time he thinks of those days he gets upset. I want to go see it again, it was that awesome.

Next time, we will talk about ways you can entertain your kids on three-day weekends!

Pointers: Aside from containing some errors and being very rambling and unfocused, the above example includes the extensive use of first-person sentences and is blog-like because the content lacks the depth needed to actually move the reader. By depth, I mean it does not describe the experience as though the reader were there in person, it simply describes what the writer did and felt.

Removing some (or all) of the "I" viewpoint will add depth and help draw readers into the experience by touching their own emotions through describing they might see at the Wall, and through the skillful use of descriptive language.

The above (mocked-up) writer also mentions the next thing he or she will write about, as though this is part of an ongoing diary or journal of their life. This is the type of thing a blog might mention, but it's not typical of article writing for informative sites such as HubPages. The photos, while interesting, are not about the topic in the piece.

It is common to see flowers and flags left at the Wall to honor victims of the war.
It is common to see flowers and flags left at the Wall to honor victims of the war. | Source

Good articles focus on the reader, not on you

While a blog can be all about the writer and can be littered with first-person sentences, that style is generally less conducive to attracting readers of online magazines. Here are a few sentences written in blog or journal styles, with examples on how to rewrite them in ways more suited for online publishing:

Vacation Example:

Before: "If I want a good vacation, I visit a beach because I like the way it's exciting and also restful and beautiful."

After: "Do you want a perfect vacation? Consider visiting a beach; the beauty of the sand and water, combined with the music of waves lapping against the shore, will allow your tension to drain and give you the rest you probably need during a break from work. But the beach can also be exciting by offering opportunities to snorkel, scuba dive, or go sailing."

Pointers: Aside from avoiding the simplistic sentences in the first version, the second version explains why a beach can be restful and paints the picture of what you might see there. It also elaborates on activities you can do on such a trip, rather than leaving the reader wondering how a beach can be both restful and exciting.

Recipe Example:

Before: "I like this mac and cheese recipe because it is delicious and I think it is just right for feeding small children."

After: "Even small children love the tasty combination of pasta with cheese in this recipe because the seasonings are gentle, yet flavorful."

Pointers: Rather than telling the reader it is delicious, the second version describes why the recipe tastes good, and why it appeals to children. The second version also leaves out the "I" language the writer resorted to in the first version.

Revision - Online Magazine Style

Here is one way to rewrite the above example and make it more suitable for an online magazine. As with many online magazines, this example still uses some first-person language, but it is designed to draw the reader into the experience in an informative and descriptive way. Again, although the type of scene described at the Wall is similar to what I've seen in my visits there, the children mentioned here are used to demonstrate how one might write about such a trip.

Spring Break Trip to Vietnam Memorial (Online Magazine Style):

This year, we took the children on an educational trip for Spring Break rather than spending time at an amusement park or fighting the crowds on a beach. We choose Washington D.C., because it has such a wealth of historic meaning for our country. With two children learning about history in middle school, we figured the timing was right for this type of trip. We weren't disappointed.

Because my children often hear their grandfather talk about his time in Vietnam, the highlight of the trip (for them, as well as for me) was the Vietnam Memorial. Before we visited the monument, we researched it a bit and discussed what it meant and why its design is so unique.

According to the U.S. National Park Service's site on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, there are currently 58,261 names of men and women engraved on the wall, all of them either killed or missing in action during the Vietnam War. To help our kids grasp the significance of this number and the humanity it represents, we pointed out that some towns near where we live have fewer than 40,000 people, which means the country lost more people during that war than the entire population of many towns and communities.

The wall's design creates a sobering experience for visitors and also invites meditation. Maya Ying Lin, who was a student at Yale University at the time, created the winning design for a competition in the early 1980s. Rather than depicting soldiers in battle, the Wall monument individually honors those who were lost through listing their thousands of names on the long walls of its black surface, which form a downward slope , forming a small area where visitors can rest and reflect on those whose names are listed. There is also a directory of the names engraved on the Wall with information on how to find a specific name along the huge sections.

As we drew closer to the wall, my children, usually very loud and active, suddenly grew quiet. Following their gazes, I realized they were intently watching an elderly man, about the age of their grandpa, as he knelt and placed an American Flag and a small bouquet of flowers at the base of one section of the wall. He rose from his knees with difficulty, then his fingers traced along the wall a bit before resting on one name. He stood there for a few minutes, and then traced the name one more time before patting it, as though to say goodbye, then bowed his head and walked away.

No words or history book could have better depicted to my children the deep scars the Vietnam War left on our country than the sight of that man saying goodbye to a loved one. We never learned whether it was his son, his daughter, his brother or sister, a fellow soldier or someone he grew up with, but we learned through seeing his reverence and sadness that those who were lost in that war were greatly loved, and that the Wall is a lasting monument to their memories.

Pointers: The revised example shows describes what was seen in a way that puts the reader into the scene and allows them to experience their own emotions rather than reading about the emotions of the writer. This example also includes some facts and data to add to the story, which is an important element content for online magazines will need. The rewritten example includes a degree of first-person language, but it also describes what the reader might have seen had she or he been there.

In this example, although the writer talks about a specific trip, he or she does not describe it as though it's a daily blog entry. In addition, the photo used here is more relevant to the content than in the earlier version.

Final thoughts

The above examples are only a few ways that writing styles in blogs generally differ from the preferred styles of most online magazines.

If your writing style resembles the way you might chat on the phone, or it doesn't include specific facts and details, you may be writing like a blogger. If you frequently talk about how much you liked something or how exciting it was without showing the reader through your words what made it enjoyable or exciting, you may be guilty of blogging rather than writing like a magazine journalist.

NOTE: Some very good writers for various online magazines and sites use their personal experiences to illustrate ways to deal with difficult situations in life, or how to overcome hardships. This type of first-person writing is often used as a vehicle for that type of article and is less likely to fall into the blog category than the examples given above.

Below are some additional articles about writing skills and how to advance your career.

Comments

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  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 2 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Paolaenergya! I think the term 'blog' has blurred things in recent years, and I know Hubpages prefers informative articles that have a lifespan, and aren't too personal. I appreciate your comment and kind words!

  • paolaenergya profile image

    Paola Bassanese 2 years ago from London

    Another excellent article - you clearly put a lot of thought into it and the examples featuring blog style vs hub style are extremely useful, thanks

  • sunilkunnoth2012 profile image

    Sunil Kumar Kunnoth 5 years ago from Calicut (Kozhikode, South India)

    Hi Marcy Goodfleisch,

    Noted your suggestion and thanks for the same.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    hi, Sunikunnoth - thanks for your comments here! I'm flattered that you'd like my tips on your hubs - since HubPages has a section for that in the Forum, I'd suggest you give that a try. Look for the Makeover topic and post a hub you'd like to get feedback on, and invite your fellow Hubbers to share tips about your writing, etc. People are always happy to help there, and you'll get a variety of pointers. Good luck!

  • sunilkunnoth2012 profile image

    Sunil Kumar Kunnoth 5 years ago from Calicut (Kozhikode, South India)

    Hi

    Very informative and useful. I will surely follow these guidelines in future. Meantime, may I request you to go thru my hubs and give me some good tips to improve, if you don't mind.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Randy - nice words, indeed, from one of our site's best writers - I appreciate it!

  • Randy Godwin profile image

    Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

    Aha! So that is what a "blog" is! Great discussion of the term and how it differs from what HP wants here, Marcy. This hub should help the new folks get a better start on HP. Rated up!

    SSSSS

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Natashalh - tell your family and friends you are absolutely not blogging if you're writing on this site. Tell them I said so!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Dinkan - so glad you like the article, and best of luck with your writing!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Carter - thanks for reading and sharing! You're right, it can be confusing to writers who are used to seeing blogs but want to author articles on sites like HubPages.

  • Natashalh profile image

    Natasha 5 years ago from Hawaii

    Good points. I struggle to explain the difference in words to friends, family members, etc. who think I spend all my time blogging. Maybe I'll do a better job of defending myself next time!

  • dinkan53 profile image

    dinkan53 5 years ago from India

    This article has added more useful information and had further established my belief that these are true. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

  • carter06 profile image

    Mary 5 years ago from Cronulla NSW

    Just getting around to some older hubs & found this helpful & informative hub...great work Marcy, as always...sharing so other newbies can be helped...cheers

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Lisa - thanks for your comment here! I started a response and then the page didn't load right - hope this one works!

    I agree with you that first-person writing can be confusing in terms of what the site prefers and what it doesn't prefer. My impression is that it's okay to write first-person hubs, but not in the type of writing style that would be blog-like, or resemble a journal or diary. I think that confuses a lot of writers. But, as you say, I wouldn't want the site to eliminate first-person writing altogether.

    It's very possible to write an informative and factual hub that is also first person, and that doesn't sound like a blog. It's also possible to write one that is not first person, and is supposed to be factual or informative, but is not good writing (and may not even be accurate in terms of facts). No wonder it's confusing.

    Have you thought about posting your thoughts above to the forum? I think there are many Hubbers who would want to comment on your points, and they may not read this hub. Let me know if you want to do that. If you post a forum thread that's word-for-word of the above, we can always delete it here so there's no duplicate. Or you could paraphrase what you say here.

    These are interesting points, and I would be curious to see the feedback on what you say from others on the site. Thanks for posting here!

  • Lisa HW profile image

    Lisa HW 5 years ago from Massachusetts

    I have a couple of comments for the discussion here. They're long (and I understand if you decide not to post such a long comment), but I think, site-wide, there's a whole lot of "not really knowing what's right/what's desirable" as far as "what a good Hub is" goes; so I think it's a discussion worth having.

    First comment: When I first signed up here there was a graphic HP had that showed where the word "Hub" came from. It was a big circle in the center, and that circle was surrounded by a lot of other circles with lines drawn to connect them to the center circle. The idea was that the Hub-subject was the main subject, and capsules with related information were represented by those smaller circles. It was said the the concept of a Hub was "information-rich page" (or something like that) with both the writing and - ideally - lots of content associated with/linked to the writing/subject. A lot of people these days seem not to be aware of that original concept (and maybe it's changed, for all I know; because I can't find the graphic when I look for it now). In any case, a lot of people seem to now just see "Hub" as "equal to" "article" or "piece-of-writing".

    Second comment: I've seen a lot of Hubs that would suggest a lot of people aren't sure about that "first-person-experience thing". A lot of Hubs do look like they're generally solid, well written, articles; but then, in the middle of things people will seem to throw in a personal-experience (maybe because they've heard that "it's the thing these days" and that "Google likes intimate familiarity with the subject").

    As it is, I write a lot of Hubs based on personal experience but also (most often) on having studied up on some subjects as a result of some personal experience. When I haven't "studied up" on a personal experience that I write about, the reason I write is often because I've seen (from that personal experience) what only someone who is very familiar with some types of things (the big, emotionally-loaded, type of life experiences) will ever understand. That means I think I have something different to say (from what is presented in research), and in fact, I may even think/know that "everything else out there" keeps seeming to miss what people who are, or have gone through, that experience (and those around them) really might benefit from by understanding a little better. So my personal choice to use a first-person approach is, in fact, to make a very clear and big deal about the fact that what I'm writing isn't "just research" or "just from books" (there's a place, and a very important place, for research and books, of course), but that when I'm offering is a) something not often showing up in research, and b) being offered with the idea of trying to share some genuine insight/understanding of a circumstance/event with the reader.

    If HP didn't allow first-person stuff I'd just either write different stuff or write elsewhere. As it is, they allow it (for now), and I assume that's because they know that sometimes writers actually have some insight/understanding to share with readers. So, I'll be honest. With so much confusion about "what a Hub should be" and "what's a good Hub", it does irk me that so many people automatically write off first-person stuff as "fluff" (and maybe even vote it down because of it).

    I really think HP needs to either out-and-out ban first-person stuff and say, "We don't want your personal insights/understanding into a subject," or else make it more clear to the Hubber population in general that first-person (but non-fiction/non-creative-writing-type-stuff) is acceptable and shouldn't, based on the first-person thing alone be voted down, flagged and/or otherwise seen as "low in quality". I find a real irony in the fact that fiction writing and some pretty bad poetry can be admired by many as "good quality"; and some information Hubs that are flimsy/shallow but contain the look of "what a Hub is supposed to be" (in the minds of some people) because they have the obligatory (and shallow) reference(s) and/or are may essentially be first-person/idea-presenting Hubs presented as if they're not) will get "glowing" comments about what "great information" or what a "great Hub" they are (especially when they so obviously look like they're produced by formula and sometimes even contain bad information to boot). First-person, non-fiction, Hubs may be the most maligned of all kinds of Hubs and yet, at the same time, people with perfectly fine information Hubs are also throwing in those clearly obligatory first-person remarks apparently in the hopes of adding "substance" to their information Hubs. It's no wonder so many people are confused.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Thelma - I'm so glad you found the hub helpful. I agree, it's not clear at first what a blog looks like compared to a hub. Both are good vehicles for writing, and both have readerships, so writers can pick the style that beat suits their work and either write hubs or get a blog going on another site. Some are doing both!

    Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

  • Thelma Alberts profile image

    Thelma Alberts 5 years ago from Germany

    This is an excellent article. Now, I learned a lot about the difference between blog and writing here in hubpages. I was confused before. Thanks for sharing. Voted up and useful.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Leros - I've also seen many hubs that are actually blogs, and many people even saying in their profile that they'll be blogging about this, that or the other. In some minds, the word blog is synonymous with writing. But it is actually a style of its own. Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • leros003 profile image

    leros003 5 years ago from Orlando, FL

    thank you for writing about this! I've read so many articles that are basically blogs. I still stick to my old school ehow "how to" writing style!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Suzanne - welcome to HubPages! I'm so glad the hub was helpful to you - and I look forward to reading your hubs here! Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

  • profile image

    suzanne ridgeway 5 years ago

    Excellent hub Marcy,

    FOUND VERY INFORMATIVE AS A NEW BLOGGER AND HUB WRITER IN THE MAKING!!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, TheMmaZone - I appreciate your reading and commenting here!

  • TheMMAZone profile image

    TheMMAZone 5 years ago from Kansas

    Very Helpful Marcy! I especially like your examples and that you disclosed the fact that they were JUST examples. Very Nice!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks for reading and commenting, rogeralbert - I'm glad you like the hub!

  • rogeralbert profile image

    rogeralbert 5 years ago

    This is Really helpful hub

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Many thanks, MSorenson! I appreciate your comments!

  • msorensson profile image

    msorensson 5 years ago

    Very helpful. Thanks!

  • Don Simkovich profile image

    Don Simkovich 5 years ago from Pasadena, CA

    Nicely written and those are good examples. I try to use a third-person approach often when dealing with business-related issues. I'm going to upload a travel article this afternoon and that will be more personal but the end goal is giving good info for the reader like an article would. There are different styles of online writing and even third-party sites have different styles and voices--almost like print magazine.

  • elnavann profile image

    elnavann 5 years ago from South Africa

    Thanks. This was very useful. I suppose a hub needs a more disciplined writing style with more "universal" appeal.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thank you, Chamilj - I'm so glad you found the hub helpful!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Kuttingxedge! I'm learning a lot by being on this site - so happy to pay it forward a bit for a change!

  • chamilj profile image

    chamilj 5 years ago from Sri Lanka

    Thank you Marcy. Really helpful hub. Voted up and shared with my followers.

  • kuttingxedge profile image

    S.P. Kelly 5 years ago from Just outside of international extradition agreements

    Great article! Thanks for sharing your expertise with us all!!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Peg - since you're one of the writers with a lot of experience here, I appreciate your feedback very much! I probably need to revisit a few hubs, too - I think I wasn't clear on the preferred HP style in my earliest hubs, and there might be a few needing some edits. So glad you like the hub!

  • PegCole17 profile image

    Peg Cole 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas

    Very helpful advice here and great pointers for all of us who are trying to develop our writing skills. Your example really drove the point home on the differences between a blog and an article. I'll be sharing this important information. Thank you for the tips. Now I better fly over to my early hubs and get to work fixing them up!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Many thanks for reading and commenting, Dubuque!

  • Dubuquedogtrainer profile image

    Dubuquedogtrainer 5 years ago from Dubuque, Iowa

    Helpful - voted up!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Shirley - thanks for reading and for your question (hey - you might want to post this in Answers, in case you can win a prize for the March contest!).

    Here's my brief take on it - hubs can be informative articles, or they can be short stories, recipes, essays or poems. None of these would be considered blogs, however, if they are properly written.

    Short stories will have a character, something of a plot, a setting, some sort of events and they will generally have a point to make (even if subtle or a bit edgy in nature). It is perfectly fine to write a short story as a hub.

    If your short story is first-person, though, be careful to avoid composing it in a diary-like or blog style of writing. As an experiment, try writing it in third-person language before converting it to first person. That will help you create it in a way that might avoid the pitfall of sounding like a blog.

    There are many good short stories or even books written in the first-person voice, but it takes a special skill to pull it off.

    I'm not sure if this is the type of information you were wanting? Hope it helps, and good luck with your hubbing!

  • profile image

    shirley Ware 5 years ago

    What is the difference between a hud and just writing a short story

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Well, it seems like you're a great fit here, Billy, for starters! I think you should do a book about some of your recovery experiences - very inspirational stuff. I like the way you use personal anecdotes to illustrate your points, without making your writing blog-like.

    Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • billybuc profile image

    Bill Holland 5 years ago from Olympia, WA

    A valuable hub with excellent suggestions. Now I just have to figure out where I fit in the world of writing. Great job!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Cookies! There were so many things I needed to learn as a newbie, too - I'm glad this was helpful for you. Welcome to HubPages! You will like the friendly community here!

  • cookies4breakfast profile image

    cookies4breakfast 5 years ago from coastal North Carolina

    Great examples! As a newbie, I really appreciate this information. Thanks for sharing!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Many thanks for reading and commenting, Deborah, and for sharing!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
    Author

    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thank you, RTalloni - I appreciate your comments, and I'm so glad you liked the hub!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Kelley - I know what you mean about the confusion, especially in a world where blogging is so common. My take on it, for what it's worth, is that if a personal anecdote specifically relates to or enhances the factual part of the hub or story, it can be used, but it's important to keep the point of the story as the focus, not the 'I' or 'me' element. If it's an anecdote about someone you know, try sticking to the third-person voice.

    Thank you for your comments!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks for reading, tsmog - I'm glad you enjoyed the hub!

  • ytsenoh profile image

    Cathy 5 years ago from Louisiana, Idaho, Kauai, Nebraska, South Dakota, Missouri

    "Good Articles Focus on the Reader, Not on You"....that about summarizes your point. Great hub, Marcy, very well written and instructional and I'm sure quite helpful. Thank you for making a distinction that is meaningful. Thumbs up.

  • tsmog profile image

    Tim Mitchell 5 years ago from Escondido, CA

    Thank you Marcy.

  • profile image

    kelleyward 5 years ago

    Great hub Marcy Goodfleisch! I always thought Hubs should be written more generally but when I got here many people told me it would be more helpful if I included personal stories, examples, etc. I'm still a little torn on whether this is a good practice or not. Thanks for sharing. Voted up!

  • RTalloni profile image

    RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

    Good stuff here. Thanks! You offer a neat contrast between blogging and hubbing in way that will be helpful to everyone across the board. It's already a hit, obviously, but am voting up with the others. :)

  • DeborahNeyens profile image

    Deborah Neyens 5 years ago from Iowa

    Great pointers, Marcy. I'm sharing this because I think many hubbers, especially the newer ones, willl benefit from this advice.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thank you, teaches - I really appreciate your feedback and comments!

  • teaches12345 profile image

    Dianna Mendez 5 years ago

    Wonderful topic and coverage on the differences between blogs and hubpages. Your before and after examples are very useful. Voted up.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Kenneth - welcome to the site! I don't have any prompts, but thank you for reading and commenting here!

  • profile image

    Kenneth Sibbett 5 years ago

    I have a blog that has a good readership and i'm glad you've written this. I have done some marketplace writing for Helium and wonder if you have any prompts. I just joined a few minutes ago, so forgive me if I missed this.

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thank you for reading and commenting, alocsin - I know you have considerable online experience; I appreciate your feedback!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Many thanks for your comments, rsusan!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    I've never blogged, either, but the writing styles are easy to spot once you know what to look for. I'm sure it's especially confusing now that so many people want to be online writers, and blogging is so very common. Thanks for reading and commenting, Mljdgulley!

  • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image
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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, Pamela - I appreciate your comments and feedback. It's easy to see how confusing it can be, isn't it?

  • alocsin profile image

    alocsin 5 years ago from Orange County, CA

    A nicely done hub for beginners and vets alike. The examples plus pointers are especially useful. Voting this Up and Interesting.

  • rsusan profile image

    Rika Susan 5 years ago from South Africa

    Excellent job, Marcy. Clearly shows the differences between writing for a blog and writing a Hub. I am sure everyone will find helpful and useful tips here.

  • mljdgulley354 profile image

    mljdgulley354 5 years ago

    Thank you for this great information. i have never done the blog thing so really didn't know the difference. This writing was very helpful.

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    Pamela Oglesby 5 years ago from United States

    As others have stated this hub contains excellent information about writing a hub versus a blog. The examples used are excellent for anyone to distinguish the difference easily. Up and very useful!

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, JKenny - I prefer writing articles, too. I know blogs are popular with online writers, and they have a following. But I guess I'm more of a traditionalist. Thank you for your comments!

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, SaraDuggan - thanks for reading and commenting. I applaud you for homeschooling your son; that is so admirable, and he will long remember the time you spent with him. I'm glad you liked the hub!

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    James Kenny 5 years ago from Birmingham, England

    Great article, Marcy. You explain the distinction between the two really well. I've never really been a big fan of blogs, as most are overly personal and resemble an online diary. I thought diaries were supposed to be private? Anyway, I much prefer writing articles or hubs; picking a topic, researching it and writing about it, far more interesting.

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    Sara Duggan 5 years ago from California

    Thanks for taking the time to write this example out. I was just learning this via my son - (I homeschool him) It described 4 purposes of writing and this was one of them. This would probably be considered descriptive writing which according to his text means showing someone something with your words rather than just telling them something.

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thank you, vimier - I'm so glad you liked the hub, and I appreciate your reading it and commenting here!

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Mr. Happy - If you click on a hub and then click on the 'flag' button, then click on Too Personal, it lists blogs and journals as the description for that problem. I think by journal, they mean more of a diary style than the journal style of an essay or something. I read a few of your hubs (very good, by the way) and I would almost think of them as essays done in the first person. That's different from the type of journal writing I'm assuming HP doesn't care for.

    As for the rules on length - I'm new here, so I'm fortunate that I didn't have to change course after writing for a long while. From what I've read, aside from poetry and recipes, the site prefers at least 400 words for a hub. I'm no expert on any of that, by the way!

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    vimier 5 years ago from Chicago, IL, United States

    This is a great Hub! Very well written and I loved the part where you rewrote the article to be fit for HubPages versus a blog post.

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    Mr. Happy 5 years ago from Toronto, Canada

    Hello again,

    can You tell me please where the site lists journal entries as something to be flagged? I was honestly not aware of that.

    I also think that over the last three years that I have been here (well just under three years), new rules pop-up here and there. I have posts with just photos: I like to let photographs speak on their own sometimes. Lately though, I have noticed a rule about how certain amount of words are needed for each piece of writing. Nonsense in my opinion. As a writer I cannot allow anyone to tell me how many words I have to use in any of my writings. I find that rather upsetting actually - this is not highschool all over again is it?

    Anyway, sorry to be a little edgy here. I am just not fond of always bumping into new rules and regulations. I am not a fan of them, as a general rule. Haha ...

    Thank You for the conversation though, I apreciate it.

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks phdast7 - I appreciate your kind praise! I'm so glad you liked the hub; thank you for commenting here.

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Hi, Mr. Happy - the hub is intended to show brief examples of styles of writing rather than samples of what would be entire hubs. I agree that some terms could be more user-friendly or descriptive (I don't care for the term 'blogger,' either).

    It sounds like your journal entries are well-crafted and contain good writing. My comment about journal entries being flagged is based on that being among the examples the site lists for flagging a hub as too personal. I have not cited any specific writers here, and I haven't read your hubs.

    Thanks for reading and commenting!

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    Mr. Happy 5 years ago from Toronto, Canada

    Greetings,

    I am one of the many guilty people who regard anything without a distinct essay format and/or bibliography and which is written on the web, a blog. I was told not long ago by a fellow "hubber" that the word "blog" sounds bad ... well, I honestly abhor the way the word "hub" and/or "hubber" sounds. Thus, I do not use them and I do not like calling myself a hubber. Nor do I like calling my pieces of writing hubs. I'd rather call them "pieces of writing".

    Regarding the examples given, they are only comparable because they both have words in them and they do speak on the same topic/experience.

    The first example has three paragraphs, plus one ending sentence. The second example has five, well developed and written paragraphs. With that in mind, should I assume that all blogs are shorter and written with one's foot in comparison to hubs? Or as You well mentioned, the first example has some mistakes. Do all blogs have mistakes as if editing is not allowed for them?

    I have a mix of essays (well researched with bibliographies and all that good stuff lol) and I have literally journal entries posted as well. I have been writing on Hub-pages for almost three years now and my journal entries have gotten reads and comments which tells me that they are being enjoyed. What's wrong with having journal entries on Hub-pages (just curious)?

    Thank You for the write, I enjoyed reading your thoughts. At least I am clearer about what some people expect from this website and/or from writers here.

    I certainly think this is a website where people can express themselves through words, photographs, videos and such. That's just my opinion though.

    All the best!

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    Theresa Ast 5 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

    Marcy - This is the second time I have read this excellent and well-written Hub, and for the life of me I do not know why I didn't leave a comment the first time. You have done a terrific job of distinguishing between and illustrating the difference between a blog and a Hub. Thank you very much. Voted all kinds of UP! :) SHARING

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thanks, homesteadbound - I think we all have to look at our writing now and then to see if we're crossing that line. Especially in a friendly community such as this, where we've made friends and we feel at home. I appreciate your comments!

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    Cindy Murdoch 5 years ago from Texas

    I have not read many blogs, but your examples made it fairly easy for me to see the difference. Now you have me thinking about my writing and wondering, especially some of my earlier pieces. I always learn so much form you. Thanks so much!

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thank you, molometer; I don't care that much for many blogs, either, although I'm sure there are many good ones out there. I think I'm too used to writing for publications. Thanks for reading and commenting!

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thank you, Sandrabusby - I appreciate you comments. It indeed can be a subtle contrast, but it makes a huge difference. Thanks for reading and sharing!

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    molometer 5 years ago from United Kingdom

    Good distinction Marcy between the two formats.

    I never did like blogs for this very reason.

    The second version is much more professional.

    It has a level of detachment without being clinical.

    Including factual information relating to the town populations, allows the reader to gauge the level of destruction, without gory details.

    Voted up interesting and useful.

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    Sandra Busby 5 years ago from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA

    Marcy, you do such a professional job of explaining the difference in writing for a blog and writing for hubpages. It's a very subtle shift, but it makes a tremendous difference. Thanks for SHARING. Sandra Busby

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    I'm glad you liked the hub, Barnsey - thank you for reading and commenting.

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    Marcy Goodfleisch 5 years ago from Planet Earth

    Thank you, emilybee! I'm so glad you found the hub helpful!

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    Barnsey 5 years ago from Happy Hunting Grounds

    This is very useful! I love the examples provided, thank you for the great tips!

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    emilybee 5 years ago

    This was very helpful for me. I'm starting to realize the differences between a hub and a blog, but didn't initially. Hubs need to have a purpose of informing the reader about something. I know some of my hubs were rambling quite a bit. Thanks so much for this, and voted up.