Are there Taboo topics about ceratin companies that may be sponsors?

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  1. Vivian Araullo profile image60
    Vivian Araulloposted 9 years ago

    Call me paranoid but Ive been trying to no avail to post a hub about bad experience and business practices of Chase credit. The website is not letting me.
    If there are conflicts of interest that hubpages encounter with its advertisers, they should be disclosed by hubpages.

  2. Fawntia profile imageSTAFF
    Fawntiaposted 9 years ago

    If you are experiencing difficulties creating a hub, I assure you that it has nothing to do with any loyalty we have to Chase or any other company. I took a look at your account and all of your unpublished hubs are empty. Are you having problems saving text inside of a text capsule? There's a good chance that you are just having problems with your internet connection. If, however, you are getting an error message of some sort, please explain in as much detail as you can what happens when you try to save text and we will see what we can do to help.

    1. Vivian Araullo profile image60
      Vivian Araulloposted 9 years agoin reply to this

      I just tried...it did it again! Weird, weird, weird. - Vivian



  3. Vivian Araullo profile image60
    Vivian Araulloposted 9 years ago

    Yes, as in the past I just cut and paste from my word document which has the original text.

    It always worked well for me, one try, before. This time, I tried many times, using the same procedure, unsuccessfully. What happens when I try to paste is that the connection times out, says an error has occured, and the connection has been lost, as per the explorer message. 

    I pasted the same thing, using the same procedure, onto my Facebook account without difficulty.

    As I said, I am being paranoid! Below is the text, which wonders, just pasted successfully on this posting...

    WHY YOU SHOULD NEVER GET A CHASE CREDIT CARD

        I opened a Chase credit card last Christmas as I was being rung up for my purchases at the Toys R Us at Bridgepointe in Foster City, California. The come-on--a ten percent discount on all my purchases for that day. Starting that relationship with Chase was the biggest mistake I have ever made so far in my financial history. 

        First of all, Chase’s DECEPTIVE brochure that came with that card said: “You pick the day you pay!” Hello, of course, I was not going to fall for that . Of course,  anyone can pick the day they pay, but you’ll still get dinged with late charges plus interest payments.  I’m not buying that.

        What I did not  realize was that flyer was just the beginning of Chase’s chain of deceptive practices. It looked like Chase wanted me to pay late because they mailed my first statement late. So I ended up with a late payment, and we know what that means. A ding on your credit report plus paying interest. I let it go. My credit is pretty much great because I am a good payer and I figured, this was going to be just one contestable ding.

    YOU OWE US MAYBE THIS AMOUNT, AND MAYBE FOR THIS REASON


        Then, I use the same card to pay for an emergency car repair. I pay it off completely, based on the amount  indicated on my last statement.  Or so I thought. To my surpirse,  I get a non-itemized bill from Chase saying that I owe Chase $9.43.  I am astounded that despite paying off the balance contained in my last Chase credit card payment, I still owe them $9.43.  The reasons stated for this charge were mutliple choice. . The letter said “It could be a late charge, a finance charge, balance transfer…”  In short, take your pick, just pay us $9.43.

        On top of the bill the words: Past due amount $9.43 were printed. But at the bottom it said “Pay At Least This Amount - $9.43”  So what, is $9.43 the actual past due amount or the minimum payment?

        “At Least?”  I wondered. Then, what at most, do I really owe you?  What kind of bill asks for a non-specific amount of money, for non-specific reasons?  Fishy, fishy.  This spurred me to call Chase.  Their representative said I actually owed $10.43. Huh? What’s the extra dollar for? Finance charge, they say. What finance charge, I ask, if I paid on time and paid in full..

        So here is Chase’s satanic modus operandi, that I figured out just there and then. They will send you a statement, but that bill will not actually be for the full amount owed.  They won’t be charging you for 100% of what you owe but rather charge you an amount you can “at least” pay for now. 

        So I pay off Chase the $10.43 despite being billed a past  due amou t of $9.43 (at least!). Had I not called Chase I would never have known that I actually needed to send in $10.43 to be completely paid off. Nothing in their non-specific statement said that the full amount to be paid off was actually $10.43.

        So I ask one last time, “So after paying this $10.43, I owe you nothing?” The representative says, “Yes, ma’am. Nothing. Zero.”

        I asked that the account be immediately closed. The representative then tranfers me to another department that handles this. The person asks why I am closing my account. I told him exactly why I believe Chase Credit engages in deceptive business practices. I ask, “Well, are you going to document this, and tell someone in your company?” The person says, “No, but you are free to write to (whatever) department about your complaint..”

        Call me stupid and naive, but I thought the person asked because they actually want to do something about it. So I asked the Chase person, “So why the heck are you asking me if you have no intention to record it and do something about it? ” 



    THE FINANCE CHARGE THAT WON’T DIE

        I knew that closing a credit card could mean a ding in your credit report because this lowers the amount of creadit available to you, and may increase your debt-to-credit ratio. However, in dealing with Chase, I decided I’d take the ding than be endlessly billed for a finance charge of a  dollar each billing cycle, and be deceived continuously on the amount I actually owe.

        A week later, Chase sends me a letter, acknowledging that they have closed my account at my request.  The end finally, of my short but hellish relationshyip with Chase.

        Then, a week later, another bill! I still owe Chase, apparently, ANOTHER dollar! Even after I paid them off and closed my account! Really?

        Once more I call Chase and the person says I should have first closed the account, then paid off the bill the day after to avoid another finance charge. What?!? What counter-intuitive rule is that? Why is it that no one told me that they’d have to charge me another dollar for paying off $10.43 TOO PROMPTLY?

        After once again telling the representative about how deceptive Chase is, she decides to strike off the $1.00 finance charge and says I now owe them nothing. Really, I thought.  I heard that before. I said, “If that is true, then send me a bill or document that says that I no longer owne you any finance charge..”
    “We don’t do that, ma’am,”  Chase representative says.

        I won’t be surprised if one day, many years from now, as I lay on my deathbed, my daughter comes up to me and says: “Mom., you got a bill from Chase. You owe them a $1.00 finance charge from that one transaction you thought you paid off back when I was a little girl.”


    CHASE CREDIT CARD: POST MORTEM

        I am not going to disparage other credit card companies. I have other cards that work just fine--meaning the amount they bill you is the amount you really owe. I have a mortgage, have had car payments, and had many credit cards of other types before, but I have never encountered such a predatory company  as Chase.

        This experience makes me wonder, how many millions, billions, trillions in dollars Chase makes on these deceptive practices. I am sure there are many consumers out there who just send in the amount they see on the bottom line of their credit card statement, and will not question a finance charge if Chase asked for it.

        The  credit card industry badly needs revamping. These crazy rules they impose just so they could penalize the very people who give them business must end. As a consumer, here is what I learned:

    HOW TO DEAL WITH CHASE

    1. Never believe the bottom line on your Chase  credit card statement. 
    2. Do not pay them off until you’ve first called them to find out what you really, truly, owe.
    3. Do not just pay a finance charge until you’ve called them. Sometimes even they recognize the finance charge is so bogus that they’ll even just wipe it off (maybe).
    4. If you have a Chase credit card, close it.
    5. Better yet, NEVER OPEN A CHASE CREDIT CARD. They are predatory and deceptive, and do not deserve your business.

        I opened a Chase credit card last Christmas as I was being rung up for my purchases at the Toys R Us at Bridgepointe in Foster City, California. The come-on--a ten percent discount on all my purchases for that day. Starting that relationship with Chase was the biggest mistake I have ever made so far in my financial history. 

        First of all, Chase’s DECEPTIVE brochure that came with that card said: “You pick the day you pay!” Hello, of course, I was not going to fall for that . Of course,  anyone can pick the day they pay, but you’ll still get dinged with late charges plus interest payments.  I’m not buying that.

        What I did not  realize was that flyer was just the beginning of Chase’s chain of deceptive practices. It looked like Chase wanted me to pay late because they mailed my first statement late. So I ended up with a late payment, and we know what that means. A ding on your credit report plus paying interest. I let it go. My credit is pretty much great because I am a good payer and I figured, this was going to be just one contestable ding.

    YOU OWE US MAYBE THIS AMOUNT, AND MAYBE FOR THIS REASON


        Then, I use the same card to pay for an emergency car repair. I pay it off completely, based on the amount  indicated on my last statement.  Or so I thought. To my surpirse,  I get a non-itemized bill from Chase saying that I owe Chase $9.43.  I am astounded that despite paying off the balance contained in my last Chase credit card payment, I still owe them $9.43.  The reasons stated for this charge were mutliple choice. . The letter said “It could be a late charge, a finance charge, balance transfer…”  In short, take your pick, just pay us $9.43.

        On top of the bill the words: Past due amount $9.43 were printed. But at the bottom it said “Pay At Least This Amount - $9.43”  So what, is $9.43 the actual past due amount or the minimum payment?

        “At Least?”  I wondered. Then, what at most, do I really owe you?  What kind of bill asks for a non-specific amount of money, for non-specific reasons?  Fishy, fishy.  This spurred me to call Chase.  Their representative said I actually owed $10.43. Huh? What’s the extra dollar for? Finance charge, they say. What finance charge, I ask, if I paid on time and paid in full..

        So here is Chase’s satanic modus operandi, that I figured out just there and then. They will send you a statement, but that bill will not actually be for the full amount owed.  They won’t be charging you for 100% of what you owe but rather charge you an amount you can “at least” pay for now. 

        So I pay off Chase the $10.43 despite being billed a past  due amou t of $9.43 (at least!). Had I not called Chase I would never have known that I actually needed to send in $10.43 to be completely paid off. Nothing in their non-specific statement said that the full amount to be paid off was actually $10.43.

        So I ask one last time, “So after paying this $10.43, I owe you nothing?” The representative says, “Yes, ma’am. Nothing. Zero.”

        I asked that the account be immediately closed. The representative then tranfers me to another department that handles this. The person asks why I am closing my account. I told him exactly why I believe Chase Credit engages in deceptive business practices. I ask, “Well, are you going to document this, and tell someone in your company?” The person says, “No, but you are free to write to (whatever) department about your complaint..”

        Call me stupid and naive, but I thought the person asked because they actually want to do something about it. So I asked the Chase person, “So why the heck are you asking me if you have no intention to record it and do something about it? ” 



    THE FINANCE CHARGE THAT WON’T DIE

        I knew that closing a credit card could mean a ding in your credit report because this lowers the amount of creadit available to you, and may increase your debt-to-credit ratio. However, in dealing with Chase, I decided I’d take the ding than be endlessly billed for a finance charge of a  dollar each billing cycle, and be deceived continuously on the amount I actually owe.

        A week later, Chase sends me a letter, acknowledging that they have closed my account at my request.  The end finally, of my short but hellish relationshyip with Chase.

        Then, a week later, another bill! I still owe Chase, apparently, ANOTHER dollar! Even after I paid them off and closed my account! Really?

        Once more I call Chase and the person says I should have first closed the account, then paid off the bill the day after to avoid another finance charge. What?!? What counter-intuitive rule is that? Why is it that no one told me that they’d have to charge me another dollar for paying off $10.43 TOO PROMPTLY?

        After once again telling the representative about how deceptive Chase is, she decides to strike off the $1.00 finance charge and says I now owe them nothing. Really, I thought.  I heard that before. I said, “If that is true, then send me a bill or document that says that I no longer owne you any finance charge..”
    “We don’t do that, ma’am,”  Chase representative says.

        I won’t be surprised if one day, many years from now, as I lay on my deathbed, my daughter comes up to me and says: “Mom., you got a bill from Chase. You owe them a $1.00 finance charge from that one transaction you thought you paid off back when I was a little girl.”


    CHASE CREDIT CARD: POST MORTEM

        I am not going to disparage other credit card companies. I have other cards that work just fine--meaning the amount they bill you is the amount you really owe. I have a mortgage, have had car payments, and had many credit cards of other types before, but I have never encountered such a predatory company  as Chase.

        This experience makes me wonder, how many millions, billions, trillions in dollars Chase makes on these deceptive practices. I am sure there are many consumers out there who just send in the amount they see on the bottom line of their credit card statement, and will not question a finance charge if Chase asked for it.

        The  credit card industry badly needs revamping. These crazy rules they impose just so they could penalize the very people who give them business must end. As a consumer, here is what I learned:

    HOW TO DEAL WITH CHASE

    1. Never believe the bottom line on your Chase  credit card statement. 
    2. Do not pay them off until you’ve first called them to find out what you really, truly, owe.
    3. Do not just pay a finance charge until you’ve called them. Sometimes even they recognize the finance charge is so bogus that they’ll even just wipe it off (maybe).
    4. If you have a Chase credit card, close it.
    5. Better yet, NEVER OPEN A CHASE CREDIT CARD. They are predatory and deceptive, and do not deserve your business.

 
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