Ideas on alternative wording?

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  1. DrMark1961 profile image97
    DrMark1961posted 20 months ago

    I am writing an article about dogs with low prey drive. In each of the breeds discussed, I discuss that types prey drive. I also discuss those dogs that have high prey drive, and what you can do to decrease prey drive.
    This looks like keyword stuffing, even if it is not. How can I use this phrase over and over throughout the article and not appear like I am using it too much?

    1. theraggededge profile image96
      theraggededgeposted 20 months agoin reply to this

      I use this resource https://onelook.com/thesaurus/?s=prey

      'Urge to hunt/kill'

      Ach... sorry brain stuck. I just tripped over one of my labs on the way out for our walk and now have a horrible hole just below my knee.

      1. DrMark1961 profile image97
        DrMark1961posted 20 months agoin reply to this

        Thanks I bookmarked that site. I saw one that might work, predatory, as in "predatory behavior".

    2. lobobrandon profile image89
      lobobrandonposted 20 months agoin reply to this

      I would not worry too much about keyword stuffing until you have finished writing your article. I've had this problem before and it seems like the keyword is mentioned a lot. But when you check out the keyword density at the end there are good chances it's going to be below 2% (an example from my experience). 

      Use a keyword density checker tool to find out the density of your article: https://www.internetmarketingninjas.com … d-density/ (the best I could find).

      What's a good keyword density? Check out the top 10 rankings and work out the average they use. This is what Google seems to love for that phrase.

      Of course, use synonyms as much as you can too. Predatory behaviour for instance.

      1. DrMark1961 profile image97
        DrMark1961posted 20 months agoin reply to this

        It is about 2000 words and I am not done yet, so I do not even think the number of times I use "prey drive" is going to be a problem. You are right, it is not something to worry about.

      2. Natalie Frank profile image93
        Natalie Frankposted 20 months agoin reply to this

        I've totally fallen out of checking keyword density - I can't believe I forgot all about it.  Thanks for the resource!  I've got work to do!

        1. lobobrandon profile image89
          lobobrandonposted 20 months agoin reply to this

          No problem. If you write naturally, there's almost always no need to worry about looking at the keyword density.

          1. DrMark1961 profile image97
            DrMark1961posted 20 months agoin reply to this

            Even in this article, where the phrase prey drive seemed to jump out in every sentence, it was actually only 1.4%. I think this is not a problem in most cases if, as you mention, it is written naturally.

            1. lobobrandon profile image89
              lobobrandonposted 20 months agoin reply to this

              Yup.

      3. profile image0
        Bob Bambergposted 20 months agoin reply to this

        How about occasionally referring to prey drive as "that behavior," simply stating that dogs which exhibit that behavior will...etc.  You could throw in the word " instinctually," as in, " these dogs will instinctually..."

        1. DrMark1961 profile image97
          DrMark1961posted 20 months agoin reply to this

          I used "negative instinctual behaviors". I know those dog trainers out there looking for high prey drive dogs will want to kill me for that one.

          1. lobobrandon profile image89
            lobobrandonposted 20 months agoin reply to this

            Don't be so negative tongue

          2. profile image0
            Bob Bambergposted 20 months agoin reply to this

            They're now forming a traveling posse to head for the Brazilian jungle.  Be on the lookout for people wearing "Cesar Sucks" t-shirts.

            1. DrMark1961 profile image97
              DrMark1961posted 20 months agoin reply to this

              You know I heard on TV that the only way to get rid of those "negativers" is to hold your fingers together, poke them in the neck, and make a "sh-sh-shh" sound.
              Oh wait, that was some guy from North America. (For us Mexico is North.)

              1. lobobrandon profile image89
                lobobrandonposted 20 months agoin reply to this

                Mexico is North America for everyone isn't it big_smile

    3. janshares profile image93
      jansharesposted 20 months ago

      How about "compelled," "require," "yearning," "inclined."

      "Some dogs are not as compelled as others . . ."
      "Some breeds require less drive . . ."
      "There are breeds less inclined to . . . "
      "This breed has a lower yearning for . . ."

      1. DrMark1961 profile image97
        DrMark1961posted 20 months agoin reply to this

        Great ideas. I am already using a few of the. Thanks for your help.

        1. janshares profile image93
          jansharesposted 20 months agoin reply to this

          My pleasure, glad to help.

    4. Solaras profile image95
      Solarasposted 20 months ago

      Are you going to be discussing the herding instinct as part of the prey drive continuum? Here is a photo you can use, just credit In Motion Photography
      https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/14070594_f1024.jpg

      .

      1. DrMark1961 profile image97
        DrMark1961posted 20 months agoin reply to this

        No,I am mostly writing for those people who do not want those high prey drives. My photos are mostly of tranquil LGDs and lapdogs that would not rise up to chase even if done so.
        Thanks for the photo though. I had some black and white Santa Ines lambs born this week. They would look fantastic in a photo with a BC. (Of course I am not sure if a BC would agree to that! Prey drive and all of that.)

     
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