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A visit the Nahoon Estuary Nature Reserve, East London South Africa May 2013

Updated on May 11, 2013
Yellow-fronted Canary, Spotted-back Weaver and Pin-tailed Whydah
Yellow-fronted Canary, Spotted-back Weaver and Pin-tailed Whydah | Source
Black-headed Oriole
Black-headed Oriole | Source
Tail-balance trick
Tail-balance trick | Source
Speckled Mousebird
Speckled Mousebird | Source
Young Doves waiting their turn at feeder
Young Doves waiting their turn at feeder | Source
Reserve Map
Reserve Map | Source
Source
Signpost along broad walk for Educational purposes
Signpost along broad walk for Educational purposes | Source
Thick-billed Weaver
Thick-billed Weaver | Source

Listing Birds for research-Citizen Scientists

Nahoon Estuary Nature Reserve – Fall visit; 08-05-2013

The Nahoon River as it flows through East London in the Easter Cape of South Africa provides the urban environment with two great Nature Reserves. The Estuary Reserve is one of them and a great birding area.Today I returned to complete a bird list for the South African Bird Atlas Program (SABAP2) run by the University of Cape Town.

Started at the bird hide where an hour of patient watching entertained me with a list of about 20 birds including the usual Weavers, Mannekins and Doves. A large group of young Laughing Doves competed for the seed supplied next to the hide. It has obviously been a good breeding season. It was interesting to see how one Dove decided the seed belonged to him and him alone and so he defended the feeder with great determination. The other Doves looked on with interest and waited their turn. One of the doves seemed to use his tail to help balance on a branch. Others literally spread their wings as they looked for every bit of sun they could get as winter is approaching in the southern hemisphere..

This area is good for Weavers and of the 16 different ones found in Southern Africa we regularly see 6 in the Nature Reserve namely Thick-billed,Dark-backed,Village, Spectacled, Cape and Yellow Weavers.Today I listed three.

A walk along the footpath to the river saw me list another couple of birds including a Dusky Flycatcher, a Common Fiscal and a secretive Bar- throated Apalis. On the river bank a White-breasted Cormorant, a Little Egret, a Kelp Gull and a Black-smith Lapwing were all busy contemplating their lot and perhaps watching for food while a Pied Kingfisher hovered over the water hunting for his meal there. The African Fish Eagle did a fly past and in the coastal forest the Knysna Turaco called its unmistakable call.

A walk along the new coastal forest path provided me with a great view of a Black-headed Oriole while a Speckled Mouse-bird searched the bushes for some morsels.

With my list for the day (two hours, the minimum requirement for a listing) coming to a respectable 40 birds I called it quits and walked back to the car and the short drive home.

An Urban Nature Reserve like we have in East London is a gem indeed and the job of listing birds remains an interesting and challenging experience and helps to update the distribution of birds in the area. It gives everyone the opportunity to become part of the research program...

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    • profile image

      R. J. Lefebvre 4 years ago

      Johan,

      Your brief hub is indeed interesting; life in every mode has my interest. However, nature and everything that catches my interest 'all beyond life': the nature of existence is beyond time and knowledge capability. When I have more time to visit some of your other hubs I will respond.

      Ronnie

    • Johan Smulders profile image
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      Johan Smulders 4 years ago from East London, South Africa

      Thanks for the comment Ronnie

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

      Thank you so very much for this great visit.

      Voted up and shared.

      Eddy.

    • Johan Smulders profile image
      Author

      Johan Smulders 4 years ago from East London, South Africa

      Thank you Eddy!

    • profile image

      R. J. Lefebvre 4 years ago

      Johan,

      This is not related to this hub, but I thought you and many others would find it interesting: Anything in any way beautiful derives its beauty from itself........and asks nothing beyond itself. by Marcus Aurelius.

      Ronnie

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      What a wonderful way to pass a day. I am so looking forward to seeing these wonderful birds and nature reserves.

    • Johan Smulders profile image
      Author

      Johan Smulders 4 years ago from East London, South Africa

      Amen to Marcus Aurelius and thanks for the comments.

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