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Controlling Prostaglandins

Updated on April 10, 2012
http://medschool.umaryland.edu/FACULTYRESEARCHPROFILE/
http://medschool.umaryland.edu/FACULTYRESEARCHPROFILE/

Prostaglandins, what?

As we mature, there are words or terminologies concerning our health that we should memorize. Medication is an expensive rescue factor if we suffer from bodily ailments that we cannot cure without the help of a medical practitioner.

By browsing several health sites, I came across with the word prostaglandins. At first, I associated it with prostate, but the meaning concerns our whole body. Without it, we can never move normally. So don’t fidget; bear with me for a while as we dig deeper to the world of prostaglandins.

Skeletal muscles and bones are the main producers of prostaglandins in the body with muscles being the site of manufacture. It also shapes our muscles when we work out in the gym but it loses shape when we travel on air because of less resistance. The Earth’s gravity also plays a major role in the production of prostaglandins. When we jog or do brisk walking, our muscles produce and release this hormone. As we flex our muscles, a local formation and release of prostaglandins is taking place.

How do our muscles work?

A constant protein turnover is taking place in our muscles. Catabolism means that old protein in the contractile tissue of the muscles is destroyed and replaced by new proteins, as in Anabolism.

Here‘s the scenario. Teenagers acquire new proteins because new proteins are produced more. Prostaglandins help in the growing of adolescents.

When we reaches 20 until 40 there is neutral production of protein and the production of prostaglandins is stabilized.

As we grow older, more and more proteins are wasted as the production is overcome by aging. In this period, elders suffer from joint and muscle pains that is triggered by low level of prostaglandins . Muscle wasting is very much apparent. As our naked eyes can see, the texture of the elders’ muscles seemed dried up.

Even, when we travel by plane, flight attendants often serve us with food rich in protein and liquids in order to maintain the level of our prostaglandins. We are usually urged to move in our seats, flex our muscles, because anabolism is reduced, causing the rebuilding mechanisms to be overwhelmed by catabolic process.

In other words, the production of prostaglandins can be also attributed with our jobs. If you work in an office  twenty-four/seven and don’t have time to go to the gym to exercise, then you can easily feel the ill-effects of having low level of prostaglandins, such as, muscle aches and joint pains.

Experts,like your personal doctor, can give you an advice on how to maintain your health properly. Even without thinking about prostaglandins.

What are Prostglandins?

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    • travel_man1971 profile imageAUTHOR

      Ireno Alcala 

      6 years ago from Bicol, Philippines

      @Concerned: Yes, in some instances. Over-production of prostaglandins can also one of the causes of hair loss.

      There are available products to combat such problem. It is called COX-2 inhibitors or NSAIDS, but results may differ from person to person.

    • profile image

      Concerned 

      6 years ago

      I just read that prostaglandin protein is responsible for hair loss?

    • travel_man1971 profile imageAUTHOR

      Ireno Alcala 

      7 years ago from Bicol, Philippines

      Thanks, earthbound. Latest knowledge on Health should be made familiar to all people.

    • earthbound1974 profile image

      earthbound1974 

      7 years ago from Bicol, Philippines

      Wow! This is first rate! Thanks for sharing, travel man. I have to tell my mother to eat more protein-rich foods to lessen muscle and joint aches.

    • travel_man1971 profile imageAUTHOR

      Ireno Alcala 

      8 years ago from Bicol, Philippines

      They say, aching joints and muscle pains are signs of old age. I had better idea and this is it, the so-called prostaglandins and how to control it. Thanks, bacville.

    • bacville profile image

      bacville 

      8 years ago from Manila, Philippines

      My grandmother often share the agonizing sickness of getting old: aching joints and muscle pains.

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