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Hanging Gardens of Babylon

Updated on August 15, 2012

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon is the most questionable place ever included in the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World list.  Its existence has been questioned by many modern day archaeologists.  It was said that it was built under the order of Nebuchadnezzar II to please his wife who came from Medea.

Babylon is an ancient city that can now be seen in south of Baghdad, Iraq.  Nebuchadnezzar II’s wife, Amytis came from Medea in ancient Persia (modern day Iran).

One reason why it is not believed is because, since the city of Babylon is a desert, it is almost impossible to place gardens, trees, and running water in this location.  How can a garden be placed in the middle of a desert?  What kind of irrigation system did it have?  However, this mysterious garden was described by Greek historians such as Strabo and Diodorus Siculus.  They each gave detailed description of the garden.  There were trees and plants of every kind.  There were also ponds and waterfalls.  The irrigation system was described as well.  But they weren’t eyewitness accounts.  The army of Alexander the Great claimed to have set foot on this mysterious garden which led to the credibility of its existence.

The second reason to believe why it’s not real is that stone tablets from Nebuchadnezzar’s reign gave detailed descriptions of the city of Babylonia but no mention of the Hanging Gardens.

Third reason to say its unbelievable is because it was said to have hung off the ground.  The highest part of the garden was about 75 feet in height.  But archeologists say that it was actually built on top of terraces or flat rooftops.

However, proofs of its existence were found in Babylon, thanks to Robert Koldeway, a German archaeologist.  They have unearthed a vaulted palace with thick walls and irrigation well in proximity to the palace and a thick wall that could form terraces and balcony.

Even with Robert Koldeway’s findings, many archaeologists are still not convinced of its existence.  Many of them believe that the hanging garden actually existed in another city.  In Nineveh, a nearby ancient Assyrian city, that is also located in modern day Iraq.  Tablets found from this place show gardens with the same description.

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Was The Ishtar Gate the entrance to The Hanging Gardens of Babylon?The Ishtar Gate was the main entrance to the city of BabylonA part of The Ishtar Gate was reconstructed and can now be seen in Pergamon Museum in Berlin, GermanyThe Ishtar Gate was once one of the seven wonders of the ancient world until it was replaced by The Pharos of Alexandria or simply known as The Lighthouse of AlexandriaMany archaeologists believed that The Ishtar Gate was mentioned in The Bible; in The Book of Bel (Apocrypha).  This part was eliminated in the modern version of The Bible.
Was The Ishtar Gate the entrance to The Hanging Gardens of Babylon?
Was The Ishtar Gate the entrance to The Hanging Gardens of Babylon?
The Ishtar Gate was the main entrance to the city of Babylon
The Ishtar Gate was the main entrance to the city of Babylon
A part of The Ishtar Gate was reconstructed and can now be seen in Pergamon Museum in Berlin, Germany
A part of The Ishtar Gate was reconstructed and can now be seen in Pergamon Museum in Berlin, Germany
The Ishtar Gate was once one of the seven wonders of the ancient world until it was replaced by The Pharos of Alexandria or simply known as The Lighthouse of Alexandria
The Ishtar Gate was once one of the seven wonders of the ancient world until it was replaced by The Pharos of Alexandria or simply known as The Lighthouse of Alexandria
Many archaeologists believed that The Ishtar Gate was mentioned in The Bible; in The Book of Bel (Apocrypha).  This part was eliminated in the modern version of The Bible.
Many archaeologists believed that The Ishtar Gate was mentioned in The Bible; in The Book of Bel (Apocrypha). This part was eliminated in the modern version of The Bible.

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    • BeatsMe profile image
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      BeatsMe 5 years ago

      :) :)

    • profile image

      JEFF 5 years ago

      THIS IS GOOD

    • BeatsMe profile image
      Author

      BeatsMe 7 years ago

      Hi Tony, thanks for reading. I'm glad you've enjoyed this. :)

    • tonymac04 profile image

      Tony McGregor 7 years ago from South Africa

      Very interesting Hub. I have always been fascinated by archaeology and the Seven Wonders.

      Love and peace

      Tony

    • BeatsMe profile image
      Author

      BeatsMe 7 years ago

      Hi GarnetBird, thanks for dropping by.

    • GarnetBird profile image

      Gloria Siess 7 years ago from Wrightwood, California

      Isn't the Ishtar Gate gorgeous? I used to work with an archaeologist and really liked this. Would enjoy your comments on my Chinese Emperor Hub (Qin) and the Terra Cotta Army.

      Nice work!

    • BeatsMe profile image
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      BeatsMe 7 years ago

      I agree Cgull. Must've looked like paradise during those times. :)

    • cgull8m profile image

      cgull8m 7 years ago from North Carolina

      I missed your Hubs, nice article about the ancient wonder, must have looked awesome at that time.

    • BeatsMe profile image
      Author

      BeatsMe 8 years ago

      Hi Quicksand, thanks for your input. I guess the saying is true, "when there's a will, there's a way". I do hope that this hanging garden is not a fable, as some had suggested. :)

    • quicksand profile image

      quicksand 8 years ago

      In many parts of the world there have been irrigation systems which still continue to baffle engineers!