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Aging: Holy Cow I Must Be Old!

Updated on October 26, 2012
I wasn't always old.
I wasn't always old. | Source
But now I am this old and it can't be denied.
But now I am this old and it can't be denied. | Source
Check out the car when I was little...that's how old I am.
Check out the car when I was little...that's how old I am. | Source

Listen, there are certain truths that cannot be denied. Even though I am young at heart and in excellent shape for someone my age, there is no denying that I have lived a fairly long time. I was recently reading an article by my friend Vicki about rotary phones and that got me thinking about the changes I have seen during my sixty-three years on this planet.

I wrote a short story once about a couple that lived next door to us when I was growing up. In “Sam’s Legacy” I discussed some of the stories that Sam and Delores Conrad told me when I was a child, stories about coming across this country in a covered wagon when they were children, and cutting large trees down with a hand saw. Great changes occurred during their lifetime together and the same has happened while I have been alive.

So I thought I would share with you some of the incredible changes that have happened while I have been walking this planet. Looking back it seems amazing to me; I didn’t really realize until I began this article how many changes I have witnessed.

Shall we begin?

WHAT ABOUT THOSE PHONES?


For the first nine years of my life our family was on a party line. For those of you who are seemingly still in diapers compared to yours truly, a party line was a shared telephone line in a neighborhood. I remember our party line had ten households hooked up to it. You would pick up the phone to make a call and many times someone else would be talking on the line. You could literally listen to someone else’s conversation if you had nothing better to do. Believe me, some of those conversations were classic entertainment.

My grandmother’s phone had to be cranked to charge up the battery so it would work; then you would click the receiver a couple times and a telephone operator would come on and ask which number you wanted to call. Oh my God I’m old!

I remember our telephone number had four digits and it remained that way until I was ten years old at which point population dictated that a prefix be added. Yes, I still remember that phone number…1536…and then Proctor, or PR 1536, and finally PR 9-1536.

FOUNTAIN PENS

Have you ever seen a movie that is set hundreds of years ago and the characters use a quill pen and dip it in ink to write? Well guess what? We used those when I was in grade school. We all had our own bottle of ink and we would dip the tip of the pen into the ink and write. I remember it clearly because those of us who were a bit naughty would dip a girl’s ponytail in our ink bottle if she wasn’t paying attention. That little trick earned me more than one trip to the principal’s office but man oh man, was it ever funny!

PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES

The first time I flew on a plane was in 1958; my family and I flew to Iowa in a Boeing 707 and it scared the hell out of me. What I remember most about that flight, however, was the fact that there were only fifty people on the plane and the stewardess took four of us at a time up to the cockpit where the pilot explained how everything worked….during the flight. Can you imagine that ever happening in today’s world?

Taking the train was still the number one way of going from Point A to Point B. Union Station in downtown Tacoma was a big deal; I remember how cool it was to hear all of the destinations being announced on the public address system. One thing that has not changed: still today you cannot understand what that person is saying on the P.A. system. It was garbled then and it is still garbled today. One would think with the advancement in technology we could rise above “now leaving on Track #9 for Bossum, Degursbi and Paturquibeb.”

Let me tell you about cars. My grandfather still had a car that required cranking the engine to start it and I wouldn’t go anywhere near that sucker when he cranked it. Our first few cars when I was a kid did not have power steering or power brakes; for those of you who are still wet behind the ears, let me tell you it took some serious muscle power to turn a car in those days. It took both hands and a fervent prayer to God when negotiating your way through traffic back in 1963 when I first started driving.

As a final note: my first car was a classic American muscle car, a 1969 Camaro. For those of you who have never driven one of the classics, man oh man have you ever missed out. I know all about fuel consumption and the damage to the environment and believe me, I’m all for better standards on cars. Having said that, there was no thrill like stomping on the gas pedal in that Camaro and hearing the deep-throated roar and having your body pushed back in the seat as the horses started to gallop. You don’t quite reach that level of excitement in a Toyota Prius! Just sayin!

MOVIE THEATERS

Drive-in theaters rocked! It was very cool going to a drive-in on a Friday night for a double-feature. Usually it was Horror Friday and those cheesy horror movies of the late 50’s and early 60’s were classics.

I’ll toss in this story for free. I was painfully shy around girls as a teenager. My buddy and I went to a drive-in one summer night back in 1964, and during intermission we were walking to the concession stand to get some popcorn. We passed by this one car that had several teenage girls in it, and one of them dropped her panties out the window. I stopped, looked at the panties, felt my face turning eight shades of crimson, picked up her panties and handed them back to her, saying, “Excuse me, I think you dropped something.” Then my buddy and I continued to the concession stand. That, my friends, is the definition of painfully shy!

Anyway, at the regular theaters you could see double-features most weeks but the really cool thing was…if you paid for a movie you could stay in the theater and watch it over and over again. Theaters also had balconies back then and if you were smart you would sit in the balcony so that you were the one throwing popcorn down below and not the one getting hit by it.

CAN YOU DIVIDE 1,273 BY 547 WITHOUT A CALCULATOR?

Well we could and still can; it’s called long division, and I can still do it. In fact, because of long division and mental math I can still figure out a pretty close rough estimate of a problem in my head today. Calculators are for wimps and you can quote me on that.

While on the school theme, we learned how to spell back then, and diagram sentences, and if we needed help there were these things called dictionaries and encyclopedias, and they were really cool. To this day I still enjoy thumbing through an encyclopedia. It always seemed to be a magical book to me.

LET’S HIDE FROM THE FULLER BRUSH MAN

Does anyone remember the Fuller Brush people? Boy, I sure do! The one that came to our neighborhood was like eighty years old and smelled like moth balls. You could see him coming, carrying this huge suitcase full of his items, and mom would have me hide behind the couch while she slipped into the closet so he would think nobody was at home. It was quite the commando maneuver and I still laugh when I think about it.

TELEVISION AND RADIO

Black and white tv set, usually about a two-inch screen, that’s what we watched. Okay, I’m kidding about the size of the screen, but I know for a fact it was tiny. It had rabbit ears for reception and one of us was constantly screwing around with those ears so we could cut down on the wavy lines and static. In fact, I remember using aluminum foil and coat hangers to get better reception. The first show I saw in color was Walt Disney followed closely by Bonanza.

Radios were in cabinets and on good days they were scratchy in sound quality. I think I got my first transistor radio, pocket-size, when I was thirteen, so 1961. It was so cool to walk around hearing the radio from your pocket. They ran on batteries, of course, and they did not last long, mainly because we never turned the radios off.

SO MUCH MORE

Too much more as a matter of fact. Bicycles had one gear and they were a true test of will going up a hill…but we managed. Woolworth stores had soda fountains and they smelled wonderful when you entered the store. Bowling alleys had pin-setters, guys in the back who put the pins up by hand once they had been knocked down. The rich owned dishwashing machines and that meant yours truly learned at an early age how to wash dishes by hand. Everyone canned fruit and nothing has ever smelled as fresh as laundry that dried out on the line. We paid cash for everything and got paid at the workplace in cash.

And on and on we go! Do I miss those days? A part of me says most definitely, yes! It was a simpler time, and advancements in technology were held in wonder and awe. Today we send un-manned probes to Mars and nobody blinks an eye.

Anyway, there is no denying that I am old in years. I have seen a lot and I expect to see a lot more before I finally go to that big drive-in movie in the sky. Hopefully when I get there, this time I’ll know what to do with those panties when they drop at my feet.

2012 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

For more articles about my formative years see the following:

http://billybuc.hubpages.com/hub/Childhood-Dreams-Where-Have-They-Gone

http://billybuc.hubpages.com/hub/My-Old-House

http://billybuc.hubpages.com/hub/Sams-Legacy-Part-I

http://billybuc.hubpages.com/hub/Sams-Legacy-A-Love-Story-Part-Two

To purchase one of my books on Kindle go to:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?_encoding=UTF8&search-alias=digital-text&field-author=William%20D.%20Holland

Have you ever talked on a party line?

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    • cclitgirl profile image

      Cynthia Calhoun 4 years ago from Western NC

      Okay, I didn't know fountain pens were still around in the 60s. My husband regularly fixes up old cars; he's getting ready to sell a Bronco with the gear shifter on the steering wheel. I can drive a standard, no problem. But a standard with the gear knob on the steering wheel where the windshield wipers would be wigs me out. Hehe. I won't drive the thing. I love the Bronco anyways, though.

      Ya know, I just started a blog about really good reads I find on HP and beyond. I'm going to link to your articles because I know they help a lot of people. :) Kudos to you, Big Bro.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Cyndi, remember, I was in grade school in 1953 so yes, they had fountain pens.

      Thank you my dear, for linking my articles...I'm glad you started a blog...send me the address, will you...thanks

    • shiningirisheyes profile image

      Shining Irish Eyes 4 years ago from Upstate, New York

      Oh Billy - How you made me reminisce. I remember the rotary phone. I also remember my Grandma still having a working originally colored tv set. You know-the one where you slid the tri-colored plastic down over the screen It made everything blue on top, pink in the middle and green on the bottom. The camaro was a priceless classic. An old boyfriend had one and I enjoyed cruising in it as well and listened to the only THREE radio stations available at the time. Heating up meals on the stove because there was no such thing as a microwave. Or how about the unbearable heat as you climbed into the airconditionless automobile. Your goal was to get the car up to top speed as fast as possible before you suffered heat stroke.

      This was just fantastic my friend.

      Regards, thank you's and hugs snet your way friend.

    • Voronwe profile image

      Voronwe 4 years ago

      I love reading about the old stuff. This was an awesome read, Billybuc! And I can do long division in my head- that quote is cool.

    • poojasd7 profile image

      poojasd7 4 years ago from India

      When I was reading this hub, I remembered my parents' statements about how things used to be different during their times(from 1950s).

      Nice write-up on recalling of those changes and of that way of life!

    • Fennelseed profile image

      Annie Fenn 4 years ago from Australia

      Oh dear, Bill, I am really feeling my age now!!! I know we had a party line in my early days, not sure if I ever spoke on it but I recall hearing other conversations!!! When I started primary school we had chalk and individual slates, then is third grade we progressed to fountain pens and each had a little ink well in the corner of our desk and each term a ink monitor would be delegated and for the term they would be required to go into class ten minutes early and fill all the ink wells.

      How lucky were you to get to see the cockpit of a boeing!! That is really special. The Drive Inn was big here in Aus too, spent many, many evenings watching movies there - the very first time I saw the original 'Dr DooLittle with Rex Harrison, I was about 8 and my big sister had just started going out with a young bloke with a car!! He took her and us three little ones to the drive in!!!

      You have bought some very special memories back Bill, so strange to think how much things have changed. I love the bowling pin-setters, that is priceless!!

      An amazingly awesome hub Bill, loved every minute and thank you for the trip down memory lane!!! It was a cracker!! My votes to you my friend and sharing.

    • tirelesstraveler profile image

      Judy Specht 4 years ago from California

      Thanks for the walk down memory lane. Amazing how much has changed. I am 6 years younger Even though I lived in a city, we has a party line. My BFF and I discovered we were on the same one accidentally. I picked up the phone one night to call her and she was talking to her aunt. TV went off the air at midnight; then it came on at 6am with the Star Spangled Banner.

    • B Lucy profile image

      B Lucy 4 years ago from Podunk, Virginia

      I saw a t-shirt one time that said "Inside every old person is a young person thinking "What the Hell Happened?" Hahaha! Another wonderful hub, my friend!

    • donnah75 profile image

      Donna Hilbrandt 4 years ago from Upstate New York

      This was a delightful read. It is this kind of writing that will help us remember and preserve our history. Although I am in my thirties, you are making me think of all the things that I have experienced that young kids have likely never heard of. It is quite amazing how things change over time. Voted up.

    • TToombs08 profile image

      Terrye Toombs 4 years ago from Somewhere between Heaven and Hell without a road map.

      lmbo! Great hub, Billy, honestly! I'm only 40, but we still had some of these things and then some! :) In Alaska, we relied on airplane to bring in the news reels and TV shows...well, in the dead of winter, the planes didn't always make it. So, there were some nights (a full week at one time) that we watched the SAME news reel every night. We had party lines on base housing and I sucked at it. And I got to drive a friends' 1969 camero...you're right...nothing like it. Our '96 Dodge 2500 V10 does a damn good job, tho, don't ask me how I know. LOL VUMS.

    • Wayne Brown profile image

      Wayne Brown 4 years ago from Texas

      I think you lived next door to me growing up! LOL! Some 50+ years later I still remember the four number sequence of our first two party line rotary phones...boy those big black suckers were heavy too...4362 and 4873. Remember the thrill of the portable transistor radio...absolute magic! There were only three television stations on the old black and white set which had to be changed by walking over to the TV and twisting the knob. Sometimes we just enjoyed watching that Indian embedded into the test pattern which occupied the screen while the stations were off the air from midnight to six in the morning. I too care little for the calculator and in some ways for the computer. We have, over time, moved from a process of educating to understant to educating to activate a process and achieve a result. Because there is no real understanding of the process, far too often we don't understand the result. A computer can totally fly an airplane today but does that justify putting a pilot in the cockpit who knows nothing of the principles of flight or the mechanics of hands on flying in less than ideal situations? No, that makes us a slave to the machine...that is not advancement in the human sense. We lived through a time of tremendous technological change all driven by the advent of the diode, the transistor, and then the microchip. It is amazing to look back fifty years and see how little of what we have today was there at that time. Good write, Bill! Thanks for sharing, Fennelseed! WB

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 4 years ago

      I'm not quite up there with you yet, but I remember lots of things that are no longer around or have changed so much you can't recognize them. Enjoyable read!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm laughing about the hot cars when you got in them...roll down the windows and hit the gas...your back sticking to the seats...horrible and fantastic all at the same time.

      Sending hugs right back atcha!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Voronwe, thank you so much and hooray for you if you can do long division in your head. That puts you in the top 1%. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Pooja, it was a much simpler lifestyle for sure and I don't think that's a bad thing at all. Thank you my young friend!

    • unknown spy profile image

      IAmForbidden 4 years ago from Neverland - where children never grow up.

      Thank you for sharing this awesome hub Billy.. I love the song too.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Annie, it was a cracker!!! I'm laughing; I haven't heard that phrase in a very long time. I love drive-in movies; we still have one about five miles from here that still shows double features on weekends...I think Bev and I need to go some night soon.

      Thank you dear; you are a cracker!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Tireless, I had forgotten about television signing off at midnight. And we only had three channels..ABC, NBC and CBS...if we were lucky!

      Thank you my friend and I'm glad you enjoyed it.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      B Lucy, that is a great tshirt! Love it! Thanks for that and for commenting.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Donnah, thank you! I really do think preserving history is important. We can learn from practically everything if we are willing.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      TT, it was amazing looking back. I remember when we got a private line I kind of missed hearing other voices when I picked up the phone. They took one of my main sources of entertainment away from me. LOL Thanks Sis!

    • TToombs08 profile image

      Terrye Toombs 4 years ago from Somewhere between Heaven and Hell without a road map.

      I was so much easier to get gossip that way. LOL

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Wayne, thank you Sir! It was an amazing time to grow up. I remember the Indian on tv and studying that sucker intensely...I don't know if I thought it would come alive if I looked at it hard enough or what? I love your comment on becoming slaves and lacking appreciation of knowledge...great write up my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glimmer, thank you! It's a sure sign of old age when you start looking back and thinking about how things once were. LOL

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      TT, without a doubt!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Spy, I always smile when you visit. Thank you my young friend.

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 4 years ago from New York, New York

      Billy, I am not as old, but either remember some of these myself or have heard of them from my parents. I do remember growing up with one TV in the house with just the broadcast stations, now we have how many channels?? Also, we had rotary phones too and now it is smartphones. Man, you brought back a ton of memories for this child of the 1970s. Loved it all though and thanks for the memories, have shared and voted up.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Janine! It has been an amazing run of technological advancements in fifty years; it should be interesting to see what happens in the next couple decades.

    • Austinstar profile image

      Austinstar 4 years ago from Somewhere in the universe

      By the time I got to school in 1957, the ink wells were replaced by number 2 pencils. We wrote in Indian Chief red tablets. I wonder if it was the same Injun on the TV?

      We also had to go to "stores" to buy stuff we couldn't grow at home. And my uncle and aunt had an "outhouse" and no indoor bathroom at all.

      My parents snuck me and my little brother in the trunk to go to the drive-ins except on "car load" nights.

      My first car was a '57 Buick Special that got 5 mpg. And my second was a '57 Packard that got even less mpg. I paid $50 for that car and drove it for 7 years.

      It's like, "who was that child?"

    • TravelAbout profile image

      Katheryn 4 years ago from United States

      Drive In Movies - a blast from the past! Although I swear I never dropped panties out the window. Never used a party line but they were still around when I was a kid. Highlight of my childhood - I was on the Pick Temple show where we each were given a box of 'Hiedy Bakery" little chocolate chip cookies along with some other trinkets. Thanks for the memories.

    • josh3418 profile image

      Joshua Zerbini 4 years ago from Pennsylvania

      I have to agree with Janine, I am even younger LOl So I can not relate, but my parents have told me all about it, and you are exactly right! :) Great hub Bill!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Austin, how could I have forgotten about the outhouses??? OMG!!! And we would turn them over out in the country when someone was inside of them...LOL...I don't even want to think about what kind of gas mileage my Camaro got.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Travel, we never got cookies...I feel cheated! Thanks for that; are you sure they weren't your panties???? LOL

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Josh! The thing is we thought we had it made; we got along quite well without the tech gadgets of today. :)

    • Nettlemere profile image

      Nettlemere 4 years ago from Burnley, Lancashire, UK

      Very enjoyable read, our first phone number was a 4 digit one and although not a party line it was an event to use the phone and we were taught to answer it very formally. None of this 'hello' that you get now a days and wonder who the heck has answered your call.

    • RealHousewife profile image

      Kelly Umphenour 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO

      Oh I do remember party lines! I moved to a very, very rural area from the city of St. Louis when I was maybe 10 and they still had them out here!! Of course, I still live in a more rural area and we can't even get At & T Internet here - still! Lol

      It's so fun to think back sometimes and see how many changes this world has taken. My my, it's been a fun ride so far!

    • Amy Becherer profile image

      Amy Becherer 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO

      I remember trying to sleep in 100 degree weather before we had central air. We made it, though. There have been several deaths in St. Louis during our 10 day relentless heatwave...one being an elderly man in a brick home that "didn't like air-conditioning." My parents relented as my brother had asthma. And, you know what, Bill, I still think it's the greatest invention ever!

      Great nostalgic read.

    • ChristyWrites profile image

      Christy Birmingham 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      My mom tells me about the 'party line' - sounds interesting! I do like your reflections. You have lived through some great changes and you are only as old as you feel - so you're doing great! :)

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for the entertaining - and informative - hub. It's a great look at the past. You brought back some memories for me, too!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nattlemere, great point! I had forgotten that; we always said, "This is the Holland residence," when we answered. Thanks for the visit.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Kelly, it's been a fantastic ride so far; I can hardly wait for my next sixty-three years. LOL Thanks buddy!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Amy, there is no doubt that air-conditioning has saved thousands of lives. I think I've only lived in one house that had it but remember where I live...it's not like we need it here. LOL..If we have two days where it hits ninety we are having a hot summer. Thanks my friend; I hope this finds you happy today.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Christy, in that case I'm only about fifteen years old. LOL Thank you my devoted and loyal follower.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Alicia, it is my pleasure. Thank you so much for visiting and commenting.

    • poojasd7 profile image

      poojasd7 4 years ago from India

      No, I am not saying it was bad. I feel it was much simpler and people lived without stress.

      They had their own inconvenience but they were happier I suppose due to less complicated life styles.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh, I agree with that completely, Pooja! Very good points.

    • poojasd7 profile image

      poojasd7 4 years ago from India

      :-) thanks buddy!

    • Tom Koecke profile image

      Tom Koecke 4 years ago from Tacoma, Washington

      billy, I'm gone for about a week, and you have so many new articles up that it will take me a week to catch up. Of course, by then you'll have more new articles up, and it will take me another week to catch up! I guess I'll just do the best I can!

      I like to complain to my kids about how tough I had it as a child. Getting up to change the channels, sitting near the phone to talk on it, and having to go out to play with other kids. Then someone really old like you has to chirp in and make it seem like I had it easy!

      If you can remember that far back, could you write a hub about when they invented dirt clods?

    • rfmoran profile image

      Russ Moran 4 years ago from Long Island, New York

      This is great stuff. Having turned 66 yesterday (same age as George W Bush and Sly Stallone) I appreciate your memories. I love your reverse-panty-raid story. Ah yes:

      -First TV 1953 or thereabouts - Nobody knew how to decorate around it so we put it in the middle of the living room and put chairs in front of it.

      -Fountain pens. The nuns thought of ballpoint pens as the devil's work for some reason.

      -Drive in movies - The foggy windshield, the bugs, the hour long drive to get out of the lot.

      Thanks for the memories Bill. I think I will do a similar hub myself, search engine optimized for Baby Boomers.

    • lambservant profile image

      Lori Colbo 4 years ago from Pacific Northwest

      Oh the memories. I lived in Tacoma too. My phone number was SK9-9339. I hated how the spiral phone cords got all twisted and if you wanted to reach out for something while on the phone, you couldn't always do so. How frustrating also that we didn't have voicemail or answering machines.

      How about transistor radios? Push lawn mowers with no engine. I can remember going to the movies on Proctor and paying .25. Do you remember Stan's Drive-in? I could get a burger, fries, milkshake for .50.

      We went to drive-in movies all throughout high school. I loved going to the Clint Eastwood double features. I saw Star Wars at the drive-in.

      Thanks for the memories. Poojah is right, there was a lot less stress in those days. I

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I loved Stan's Drive-In, lambservant...great burgers...or so it seemed at the time. Went to the Proctor theater often..we probably were there at the same time. :) Yes, PR on the prefix switched to Skyine and oh, those spiral cords used to drive me nuts. LOL Thanks for the visit.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      rfmoran, it took forever to get out of a drive in, didn't it? LOL I don't remember when we got our first tv but it was right around '53. Great memories. Thank you my friend!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Tom, you are so brutal. LOL I'll get back to you on the dirt clods question. So where did you go to for a week? Don't tell me vacation; I can't afford to be jealous right now! Thanks buddy!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Pooja, anytime! :)

    • Tom Koecke profile image

      Tom Koecke 4 years ago from Tacoma, Washington

      For Father's Day, my kids got me a stay at Seaside, Oregon for the 4th of July. We had a beautiful room, but the wi-fi didn't work at the hotel, so I was out of the loop for a while. If that wasn't bad enough, the cell phone barely got reception, so we had to do things like plan get togethers and such!

      Oh, I'm such a slave to modern living!

      It was a wonderful few days. I'm quite lucky to have such great children!

    • Deborah Brooks profile image

      Deborah Brooks Langford 4 years ago from Brownsville,TX

      Oh MY I AM SO OLD!!! I will be 61 tomorrow.. OH NO!!!lol.. I remember all that you are talking about. One crank up phone.. candy for 1 cents.. gas for .25 cents.. I am so old.. Love this took me down memory lane.

      Blessings

      sharing

      Debbie

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Tom, every year when I was a kid, our family would go to Seaside. I have great memories of that town. Yes, you have great children!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well Debbie, a very Happy Birthday is being sent to you. You are a wonder and I am grateful to have you in my life. Thank you for being who you are!

    • profile image

      Lynn S. Murphy 4 years ago

      As much as technology rocks I wonder if some of its responsible for one's decline. Without AC you sat on your front porch got to know your neighbors, without robots doing your chores - you actually had to do it physically; like push a mower, scrub the floors, whack the hedges. Oh and snail mail now - nothing like a piece of handwritten correspondence. And talking instead of texting. GREAT hub! Thanks for the memories....

      And I too am a slave to modern living!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lynn, I believe we all are to one extent or another. I'm trying to reverse that process but it is very difficult to do so.

      Thank you!

    • Ron Hawkster profile image

      Ron Hawkster 4 years ago from United States of America

      Billy,

      Party lines are still there. The only difference is they are involuntary party lines. Those are the phones (mobile or otherwise) on which people talk loudly, sharing every detail whether you want it or not. They're there in restaurants, on elevators, in lobbies, at work place, and you can't get away from them. You may not hear the person on the other side of the phone but the way the person at this end talks you can follow the conversation regardless. I wish party lines had gone out of style completely.

      That was a fun read. See? Being old counts for something. You can entertain people with many stories!

    • Happyboomernurse profile image

      Gail Sobotkin 4 years ago from South Carolina

      Thanks for this fun trip down memory lane. I remember most of these things but not all. (smile)

      The panty drop was a hoot! How I'd love to see the expression on your face when you picked it up and gave it back!

      The things I remember most are rotary phones, sweltering in cars and houses because there was no air conditioning and listening to "Sherry Baby" on my brand new transistor radio.

      Voted up across the board.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ron, I am actually pretty laid back, but people talking on cell phones in public have a way of annoying me immediately. I think I need to work on that character defect.

      Thank you Sir! It's nice when old counts for something. :)

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Gail, nice one! I caught that little reference to the fact that you are younger than I am! LOL Thank you and I loved singing "Sherry Baby" in falsetto!

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      Evans4life 4 years ago

      Great read! I had a party line in college. I remember when the guy I was dating fell asleep while we were talking. I oouldn't wake him so I hung up and went to bed. The next morning another party that used the same line wanted to use the phone and he was still snoring on the line. LOL!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Evanas, now that is funny! We had them in college too and man oh man did we play some pranks! LOL Great memories! Thank you so much for stopping by.

    • Ruchira profile image

      Ruchira 4 years ago from United States

      Okay...I must admit...I am OLD too :)

      All these things were there while I was growing up. A telephone, a black and white television, in school I used an ink pen, a radio,which had my favorite shows!

      Gosh...those were simple days, Bill.

      Thank you for taking me back to my memory lanes :)

      you are awesome!!

      voted up as awesome and sharing it across

    • Georgie Lowery profile image

      Georgianna Lowery 4 years ago from Slaton, Texas USA

      billybuc, you are amazing. I wouldn't say old, I'd say 'like fine wine at wine thirty.' It is crazy to think about how so many things have happened to the world during our lives, though. People younger than probably fifteen will never know what it was like without the internet in every house hold, debit cards, cell phones and Sonic. It makes us appreciate these things more, I think.

      I'm voting this Hub up and sharing with everyone I know. Keep on keeping on! :D

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruchira, they were simpler days and dang it, I miss them! Thank you for the awesome compliment; I'll try never to disappoint you.

      your friend,

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Georgie, you are so nice! Thank you my friend! I think you are a treasure and it's a thrill to watch you grow as a writer.

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      Heaven L Burkes 4 years ago from The Invincible Heart of Neverland

      This is GOLD! I love it! I bow to your talent!!! You got a waaaaay up vote and all across the board kudos! I see that lots of others feel the same. I adore this pictures too! I loved our rotary phone. The sound of dialing and the feel of it was great.

      I just got in on the tail-end of party lines (that's p-a-r-t-y, not panty) - so I didn't know quite how to answer your question about that. LOL

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Heaven, LOL....it's probably just as well you didn't answer the question. Thank you my friend; life was so much simpler back then...in some ways...but simpler is not necessarily better in many ways.

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      Patricia Scott 4 years ago from sunny Florida

      First of all, billybuc, I knew you wrote this when I saw the title. I do so enjoy reading what you post.

      Now I must say that you must have lived in a metropolis if you had a drive in in your town. Not only did we not have a drive in in the tiny town of Deltaville, VA., we had no theater. Our nearest theater was in a neighboring county, 30 miles away, so trips to the movies were infrequent.

      This was a great trip down memory lane. Thanks for sharing. Voted up and awesome.

    • Ron Hawkster profile image

      Ron Hawkster 4 years ago from United States of America

      Billy,

      I was kidding, my man. You're not old. But yes, we're all getting older. Every time someone say "I'm not getting any younger", I wonder, is there anyone in the world who is?

      For wine to get fine it must age.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      pstraubie, you are right on...grew up in Tacoma, WA population 150,000 and we have several drive-ins to choose from. Great times for sure.

      Thank you so much for the visit and comment.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ron, the perfect comment. I am a glass of merlot, aging beautifully!

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      Tammy 4 years ago from North Carolina

      I am really glad you wrote this hub. It makes me stop and remember my Grandma who was a very mischeivious woman. She lived alone most of her life next door to my childhood home. For fun she would listen to conversations on the party line. When those were discontinued, she got a scanner. Good memories. I am not THAT old but my kids don't believe in the myth of rotary phones, a day when there was no microwave, VCR, and everyone who lived in rural Pennsylvania had a CB radio for fun. Thanks for bringing back some great old memories.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Well, Tammy, I am that old. :) I never got into the CB radio craze but now I'd like to. I'm sure there are some out there who still do it for a hobby. Might be fun to try! As usual, I can always count on you stopping by with encouragement. Thank you my dear!

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

      I can't stop laughing. You are so funny.. I can't relate to the telephone party lines or ink pen, but the drive- in, I loved. That was every Saturday night come rain or shine. Life was good back then. Every family had a home, a job, those were the good old days. Thank's for the memories my friend...

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruby, I always love seeing you visit. I need to go to the drive in again soon. I'll let you know if the experience is as good as it once was. Thank you!

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      RunningDeer 4 years ago from Iowa

      I was born in the late eighties and still vaguely remember a few of these things. What a fun hub! Voted up and sharing.

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      moonlake 4 years ago from America

      I remember all of this. I hated those party lines with the neighbors listening in to every word. I was thinking of drive-ins the yesterday. Kids now days don't know what their missing. I friends and I use to go to the drive-in every friday just for the horror movies. I also loved the drive-ins with car hops, not many of those left. Vanilla, cherry, and chocolate cokes. Voted Up

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      Paula 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      OMG....bill....this is painful, buddy, but I'll play.......I remember our phone without a dial at all.....when you picked up the receiver and waited for the Operator to say, "Number Please?"....and we had Three-digit numbers...I even remember ours was 766.....Oh dear, I'm getting heart burn.....and the FOUNTAIN PENS! I'd forgottn all about them! and rabbit ears on the B&W TV.....that eventually became the antennae, my Dad would climb the roof to adjust!

      My sister and I could see a Saturday matinee at the theater for 50 cents each....and popcorn was 25 cents a bag.......& if we had extra money, a dbl dip ice cream cone was one nickle!

      and THE FULLER BRUSH MAN was "Bob," married to my mother's cousin and he would come in and visit and have coffee.....and my mother bought my sister and I boar-bristle hair brushes which we hated!!

      Oh my....Lions and Tigers and OLD COOTS.......I can't believe you did this to us!! I hate it, but I had so much FUN remembering!! Thanks bill...I think. UP++

    • B Lucy profile image

      B Lucy 4 years ago from Podunk, Virginia

      BR549!

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      Murphy 4 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

      I remember on sunny days it was filling up my little red wagon with a red and white igloo jug of lemonade, a brown bag of a dozen PB&J's, a dozen apples, and some licorice whips. It was 7:00 and we were meeting the rest of the neighborhood gang at 7:30 at the park for an all day marathon of baseball.. The only rule for the day was to be home before dark.. Like dinner wasn't even important for us.

      On rainy days it was the same routine except for half the sandwiches, half the apples, and only half the neighborhood gang. We were the fishermen.

      Looking back on it now realizing that mom was one PB&J makin' machine...

      My flexible flyer runner sled in the winter. On our private self constructed, groomed, and repaired, and dangerous as all heck, bobsled run that went through 3 yards, plus 2 blocks alongside the roads edge... We calculated a full 1000ft. of curvy slicked up ice suicide. It didn't matter if it was 20 degrees below 0 windchill... We stayed out all day and all night except for lunch and dinner because apparently those meals were more important during the winter.

      We climbed trees, built forts in trees and underground, and chased girls with our hands full of jumbo frogs that we threatened them with.

      My Schwinn fastback banana seat bicycle with the chopper handles and a fat slick rear tire. Playing cards fastened to the front wheel fork with clothes pins to give our rides that extra menacing sound.

      Why did we do all these crazy things back then ?

      Answer: No Nintendo

      Thanks for inspiring the memories Bill !!!

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 4 years ago from San Francisco

      I didn't grow old till 2010

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      B....you lost me??? was that your phone number when you were a kid???

    • B Lucy profile image

      B Lucy 4 years ago from Podunk, Virginia

      Hahaha! I'm not quite that old. But it was a phone number from a skit on a television show. All this talk of party lines . .

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      RunningDeer...the eighties??? You are still wet behind the ears! LOL...thank you my young friend; I appreciate your visit.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      moonlake...vanilla cokes...YUMMY! I'd forgotten about those; thanks for that memory. Now where can I find one?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Paula, you loved every minute of it and you know it! Those were fun times for a great many reasons, but like everything in life, probably more fun in the memory of them than the actuality. Thanks buddy; now back to reality!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Critical, I swear to God you and I lived in the same neighborhood. LOL We did all those things, and after we did them we started in again. I was rarely bored as a child; I have nothing but fond memories of those days and the long summer that seemed to go on forever, when time had no meaning. Great comment; thank you!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      B, my sincere apologies! I must have missed that show. I'm sorry you missed out on party lines; they were the cheapest entertainment going at the time.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mhatter, I'm disappointed you grew up then. :) Thanks my friend!

    • Lord De Cross profile image

      Joseph De Cross 4 years ago

      Pretty Impressive Bill. You shoul add those eight-track tape. My family raised us on those B & W pics. Polaroids were fun. Shoudn't add the IBM punching cards, 1234567890. But Gee! The rest was kept back in our memories. From Bonanza to Dr. Kildare.... I better stop, Lol! You are just 13 years ahead, so we were pretty close. Thanks for taking us back through memory lane.

    • sweethearts2 profile image

      sweethearts2 4 years ago from Northwest Indiana

      Caller ID - no screening calls back then

      Elevators - had operators and then came push buttons and elevator music.

      Paid by cash - and change was counted back to you.

      Laundry-wringer washing machine, ironing boards and irons and the clothes after drying on the line were sprinkled with a pop bottle with a sprinkler head cork

      Pop was sold in bottles and needed bottle openers usually on the side of the pop machine

      Collecting and returning pop bottles was a for profit hobby

      Cards were clipped in the spokes of our bikes

      See what you started - thank you

    • elle64 profile image

      elle64 4 years ago from Scandinavia

      Anothr good hub- thanks

    • LaThing profile image

      LaThing 4 years ago from From a World Within, USA

      This is beautiful..... And the added comments from EVERYONE..... What a great community!! The love, the brotherhood (and sisterhood), the memories, it's just pouring out! Magnificent display!!

      I am about 18 years younger than you Billy, but I remember by grandfather's TV with 'tube bulbs' (?) inside them..... My father's fountain pen, the dial phones, flip cell phones were only in Star Trek, LP records, the Punch Cards JD, the black and green computer screens, ......Life has changed so much, hasn't it?!

      Thanks Billy for sharing, voting up and everything :)

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      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Hey Bill, a lot of memories cam flooding back from the days of yore. I still remember there weren't any balconies in theaters, just one big hall divided by different colored seats for different payments. Back then we had those steam driven rail engines and motor cars had the gear lever one side of the steering wheel, which wasn't power driven, and no air conditioning. In fact, air conditioning was not needed then as summers were cool.

      I still remember by the time we returned from school the fountain pens had smudged our shirt pockets and hands and a number of times our books too got smudged with leaked ink from the ink bottles we carried in our school bags.

      But it was fun. Life was simple without any rush. I too must be old now that I also have reminisced about those times.

      Great read my friend. Up all the way.

    • Paul Kuehn profile image

      Paul Richard Kuehn 4 years ago from Udorn City, Thailand

      Great hub Billy! Yes, I do remember the crank up phones which my grandma had and the party line phones. I remember having one in the late 50s and early 60s when we first moved out to the farm. I also remember our party line phone number - 29J1 - it had a combination of four letters and digits just like yours. You're a youngster compared to me. I'll be 68 in August, but I still feel like I'm in my 20s. Voted up and sharing.

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      bankscottage 4 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Great Hub Billy. You need to move to a small town and go back in time. We still have a great (old) movie theater in downtown, but it was retrofitted with 2 screens instead of double features. Many towns still have drive-ins, but the sound comes thru the car radio instead of the speaker you hang on the window.

      GL4-8627, my phone number growing up (a party line at one time). My parents had it until I was in my late 30's and then my father decided to change it. His new number was similar to the cab company number. After several 1AM calls for a cab I think he regretted the change. In small towns, until recently, the first 3 numbers were the same for everybody. Locals would give phone numbers by only the last 4 numbers. Newcomers would hate it.

      Even my kids now seen old. When they were little they would watch videos and they could be paused to run to the bathroom. When we watched tv, they couldn't understand why they couldn't pause live tv. Now that there is TIVO boy do my explanations sound stupid today.

      Finally, how can you tell you are old? You know how to make change without the cash register figuring it out for you.

    • Trinity M profile image

      Trinity M 4 years ago

      Oh billybuc, that is true of ALL generations. Time passes us all by and when we compare today to yesterday we all seem old. I always say to my son that he sounds like a broken record. Of course he looks at me like I’ve gone mad… “what is a record mom?”. I suppose time stops for no man (or woman) and what keeps us young is change, as long as we keep changing with the changes. You are a 60 something year young man who writes hubs on the internet, so I think you’re doing pretty well. Great hub as always. :)

    • Gypsy48 profile image

      Gypsy48 4 years ago

      Bill, this wonderful hub certainly took me down memory lane as I am 63. I would babysit so I could buy a 9 volt battery for my transistor radio. I thought I was so cool with this top of the line device! Also there were no fast food joints on every corner like today. Back then fast food was just how quickly my mom could get on the table! Great read as always.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lord, it's funny about 8-track tapes...they just weren't around very long..I never did buy an 8-track player because by the time I decided to do it they were obsolete. I had forgotten about IBM punching cards....good stuff indeed. Thank you my friend!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sweethearts, I loved putting baseball cards in the spokes...and darn it, ice cold pop from actual ice in the mom and pop grocery stores...for sure elevator operators...all of it I remember clearly. Thanks for adding to the list ....love it!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Elle!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LaThing...you added one I had forgotten but my wife remembered...the tubes in the back of the television...those things scared me when I was a kid. I kept thinking they would blow up. LOL

      Thank you; this is a great community indeed!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rajan, I love the comments because they remind me of other things...yes, there were ink stains in our school bag and yes, the gear shift on the steering wheel with only three gears. Wow...I want to go back in time. :) Thank you Sir! You are a good man and I'm proud to know you.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Paul, I think until the day they put me to rest in the ground I'll feel like I'm twenty. LOL Thank you so much for stopping by and adding to the memories.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      bankscottage...you are right about small towns. My family is from Charles City, Iowa, and everything you spoke about was there. I love the line about making change...to me it is still amazing that clerks can't do that without the aid of a computer screen. Sheez!

      Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Trinity, and you are a sweet, kind person who is far wiser than I was at your age. :) I still prefer LP's to CD's for sound...but then that may just be nostalgia speaking and not the actual truth. Thank you my young friend; I always smile when I see your face pop up...and that is a gift I am appreciative of.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Gypsy, no way you are 63!!!! You look way too young! We of course had Dairy Queens and A&W's, and thought it was pretty cool how fast that food was prepared...much faster world today...I doubt if that is good but we all expect it and hate to stand in line because we are sooooo busy.

      Thank you!

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      time2rite 4 years ago from Navarre, Fl, USA

      Thanks, BillyBuc, for taking us back in time with you; I thoroughly enjoyed the trip! I don't go back quite as far, but I sure remember those old cars...my dad had some Chevys. I remember he and buddies pulling the engines out, taking them apart and cleaning it all by hand before putting it all back together and hoisting the engine back in. I still remember the smell of the interior and the fact there weren't seat belts then. I was born in the mid-sixities, so I remember all too well the tv shows and movies in black and white. And those rabbit ears and tin foil! Hilarious now, but a pain then! Times were indeed simpler and I somtimes long for them in our busy world, but not so sure I'm ready to part with my dishwasher, or my laptop and smartphone, lol! One day THESE will be "the good ole days". Thanks for sharing; I truly enjoyed your hub.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Time2rite, now there is a thought...we are living in what will be considered the good old days. LOL I'll tell you something else about those cars of the 50's and 60's...even the average citizen could work on them. Back then I could tune up a car when I was in my teens; now I wouldn't even consider attempting such a thing.

      Anyway, thank you so much for taking the time to visit my site.

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      PWalker281 4 years ago

      I'm just a couple of years behind you, billybuc, so I remember most of the things you've shared in this wonderful hub about life "back in the day."

      Long division? Hated it! Diagramming sentences? Loved it! Remember learning multiplication tables and weekly spelling tests? Do they even teach grammar in school anymore? If some of the content I read online these days is any indication, I seriously doubt it.

      While I enjoy the advances that technology has brought us, it's definitely been a double-edged sword in other respects. Great hub. Voted up and across.

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      Mary Craig 4 years ago from New York

      Well I have to tell you in NYC we were much more advanced than you were...our phone number EV7-7886 (in the fifties), fountain pens were still around but being replaced by fountain-type pens with cartridges in them so we didn't need bottles of ink though the cool girls used bottles of ink with sky blue ink instead of navy! We all owned roller skates (with four metal wheels, the kind of skates that clip onto your shoes)that we used almost every day and our skate key was always around our neck. I had an English racer -- a bike with THREE speeds! I was the envy of the neighborhood.

      The only time we got to go to the drive-in was when we went on vacation in upstate NY, the country then.

      I'm looking here and it looks like I'm trying to write my own hub! You really got the memories flowing with this one. All of us old folks are enjoying and reminiscing with this one.

      Voted up, useful, awesome, and interesting!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      PWalker, thank you for one comment in particular....regarding the content that we see online lately. I shake my head at the poor quality.

      I also like your comment about technology....there are times I really wonder if it is advancement.

      I appreciate you stopping by AND I appreciate your outlook and opinions.

      bill

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, I got an English racer for my thirteenth birthday and boy, did I think I was special. Yes to the roller skates and the key...and you are showing off with that phone number! LOL

      Thanks buddy; hope you are having a great weekend!

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      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Holy Cow I'am About That Old - How did we ever survive our childhood when we rode our bikes all day long without helmets? Do you remember the banana seat bikes? How did we survive lying in the back dashboard of our parents Lincoln and no seatbelts? The first movie I saw at a drive-in was Jaws when my husband and I were dating. Ha. Just since we've been married, going on 35 years now - a lot of things were invented such as faxes, beepers, pagers, cellphones, computers, internet and so on. I remember laughing at my husband when he got a pager, as I asked him did he think he was a doctor on call. I remember my first job just being amazed as we had a telecopier - Ha, as the fax machine was not invented and I typed 12-page insurance policies on a manual typewriter and had to use white-out to correct the twelve copies! I am glad for technology on that one! Ha. Growing up, we played outside all day long and we were never bored. My husband's mom grew up with the party-line in their small town, so he used it when he was very young. We did have the eight-track tapes too, as Lord mentioned. When we were first married, we had a 13-inch black and white TV with antennas until one day it finally blew up. I used to be able to remember phone numbers, but not now, I have to get my cellphone and look them up-pitiful. My first job at the A & P grocery store I was a cashier and we didn't have the beep, beeps, and had to take a math test and make a 100, as we had to figure change and tax in our heads. Ahhhhhhhhh the good ole days for sure. In His Love, Faith Reaper

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      Mohan Kumar 4 years ago from UK

      Delicious nostalgia, Bill, how times change. Your reminscences of bygone things is a delight to read.

      It is a great reminder of change and progress (and sometimes losing something beautiful - I love fountain pens and quill pens- I like using them in calligraphy) As I grew up in India - our family comes from rural stock so a lot of modern developments arrived late- I still remember the dial up phone, black and white tellies (not that we had one our neighbour did) and old fashioned cars simply because modernization arrived late to India and it always used to 10-20 years behind- not anymore!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, you had me laughing...I remember smoke coming out of the back of the television after a tube blew up. I remember riding in the back of pickup trucks and thinking that was the coolest thing ever. I am happy about copy machines as I could never get the hang of white out. LOL

      Great comment my friend; I hope you are feeling better.

      love and peace,

      bill

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Doc, an interesting look at a nation that was a little slow to arrive in the modernized world. Thank you for that comment and history lesson.

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      Mark G Weller 4 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

      Another great article Bill. I remember those dial phones and the TV with huge knobs and The Saturday Afternoon Movie.

      The Schwinn bicycles (Stingray).

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hey Mark! I don't remember having a Stingray but I do remember having an English Racer....thought I was hot shit with that one. :) Thanks my friend!

    • Dexter Yarbrough profile image

      Dexter Yarbrough 4 years ago from United States

      Billybuc! Great walk down the Lane of Memories. Truthfully, I would trade in all this modern technology for a TV where I have to turn the knob to change the channel. No more email and internet, just good conversation and the World Book Encyclopedia. Watching kids play and ride bikes instead of getting fat playing video games and learning how to kill on those video games.

      Times have changed but sometimes I wonder if for the better.

      Riding on the back of a pickup, party lines and riding trains to visit relatives. Those were the days!

      A great hub, as usual!

    • Made profile image

      Madeleine Salin 4 years ago from Finland

      Suddenly I feel very young, LOL! My parents are in your age and I have heard about all the things you describe. My spouse has a 1963 Chevrolet Impala waiting for him to fix. I guess that will be his next project after our house is finished. He drove the car 15 years ago before he took it apart. I loved the story about the panties - you had me laughing there. :) Remember that age is just a number. It's how you feel inside that counts. Wonderful hub!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dexter, I echo your sentiments completely! Advancement does not, necessarily, mean betterment. Thank you my friend!

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Made, I certainly hope you are right, because I feel about twenty years old. :) Thank you my friend!

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      Sparklea 4 years ago from Upstate New York

      billybuc : voted up, funny and awesome! What a great travel hub down Memory Lane!

      When I was with my first husband, and my son and daughter were little, we lived in an old house in the country that was formerly a railroad station.

      I remember that aggravating party line. I wasn't on the phone much because people would get annoyed...I hear a phone pick up, slam down, then over and over every minute or so!

      My grandparents who raised me had a glider on our front porch which we used all summer long, especially in the evenings.

      When dating my second husband, he told me he loved me while at a drive-in movie. (LOVE YOUR PANTY DROP STORY!) A very memorable moment for me.

      You brought back memories of simpler times...and they WERE! I'm so glad some towns remain historic. I also love the Johnny Rockets restaurants where the waiters and waitresses dance and sing to 50's music. Have you ever been to one?

      I think that even, today, we can simplify our lives by getting rid of material things that are not that important. We can still sit on our porches (if we have them), drink lemonade, read a good book, or chat with friends/family.

      That being said, thank you for this extremely informative entertaining and interesting hub.

      Blessings, Sparklea :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lea, I love gliders on front porches....so very cool! You added some great memories, all of which I have experienced. Yes, simplification is the key I believe. Thank you dear lady.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 4 years ago

      I remember the party-line phones. I was really young, so was not allowed to use them but I do remember my mom having to check the line periodically so see if the phone line was clear. Mayberry USA! The Fuller Brush man came around and my mom would occasionally buy one, but the I kind of miss the days when the milkman, breadman and eggman came around. It would save me some time in grocery shopping today. Enjoyed the read and voted up!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dianna, there was so much I wanted to add to that hub...I loved the sound of the milkman leaving the bottles of milk on the porch...the sound alone was reassuring if you know what I mean.

      Anyway, as always, thank you!

    • HughC profile image

      HughC 4 years ago from New York's beautiful Hudson Valley

      hahaha! i remember party lines, took me to the age of about 15 to figure out which ring sequence was for us. i also remember making long distance calls, dial O and our operator, Agnes would do the rest!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hugh, it's funny the things I didn't recall until my readers pointed them out...I had forgotten about the ring sequence...duh! Great comment and thanks.

    • ashish04joshi profile image

      Ashish Joshi 4 years ago from India

      A truly engaging piece, Sir...I haven't used a party line though, but I do remember flattering my Grandma if I had to make a call through the landline phone we had, and today those too are about to be extinct.

      Looking at the way things have changed in the past 25 years of my life, I too should consider myself old. In fact, I do, at times.

      Thanks for sharing this. What a wonderful read!!!

      'Up' and away...And shared of course...

    • myownlife profile image

      myownlife 4 years ago from london

      obviously the truth is our shadow, that can't be denied, so we have never choice on this.

      True extraction .

      Interesting!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ashish, you are a very loyal follower and I thank you sincerely.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Myownlife, very true words my friend. Thank you!

    • brenda12lynette profile image

      brenda12lynette 4 years ago from Utah

      I love drive-in theaters, and my parents have never owned a dishwasher. They also canned! I hope to learn the art when I have a bigger garden in the future.

      Thanks for sharing these memories billybuc. You truly have lived a fascinating life!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brenda, do you want to know the weird thing? It didn't seem like it was a fascinating life....it just seemed normal. Looking back now I guess it was somewhat fascinating, but when you are in the middle of it, it just seems like the norm. :) Thank you; I like that you are going to do canning; you really seem to have your head on straight young lady.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Billy,

      What fun memories and yes, I am as "old as dirt" according to your voting survey. I even remember my parent's party line number in Wisconsin. It was LO 7-3108. The LO stood for Logan. I can't necessarily remember what I ate yesterday...but that memory has remained. Ha!

      I wrote a hub about going to those old drive in movies and also one about my memories of growing up in the 1950's.

      The fuller brush man. Check! Washing dishes. Check! Laundry out on clotheslines. Check! Canning food. Check! Black and white TV. Check! One thing you forgot to mention was getting milk deliveries in glass bottles with those little paper caps on them. My parents would put the empty bottles out on the appropriate day in a metal type stand, and they would be replaced by the full ones. No sealed tops like today. I guess people had not yet thought of vandalizing milk. Those were good old days!

      Many votes up and sharing.

    • Lucky Cats profile image

      Kathy 4 years ago from The beautiful Napa Valley, California

      Hello dear Billybuc...what a beautiful story of memories about such an innocent time. Magical! I think those were the last days of harmless mischief and summer freedom. All the complete romance of such an era...aren't you glad you were able to experience it? So much FUN! this sounds like so much Fun! And Discovery! You got to discover...to find out for yourself about life..rather than being fed a continual stream of how you/it "should" be and "should" feel and forced to live youthful ears in ironic cynicism No...you got to have the halcyon Norman Rockwell childhood.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hey Peggy, I may have to add the milk bottles. I loved getting milk deliveries in bottles; every once in awhile I'll see them in a store and I have this urge to buy them....just because. :)

      Thank you my friend; I'm glad you enjoyed the trip down Memory Lane!

    • Ronna Pennington profile image

      Ronna Pennington 4 years ago from Arkansas

      THANK YOU for writing this!!! You've inspired me to do the same, except I'll be changing the Fuller Brush man for the Avon lady.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lucky, great comment and you are right, I do feel lucky that I grew up at such a time. There was infinitely more freedom back then, and a simpler way of life that felt safe and comfortable. Thank you my friend; I'm glad you enjoyed the memories.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ronna, you are very welcome....it's funny, but I don't think we had the Avon Lady come around our neighborhood....I don't remember her if she did. Have fun writing your hub; I look forward to reading it.

    • shalini sharan profile image

      shalini sharan 4 years ago from Delhi

      sir as ys i really loved your work

      sharing it on HH

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Shalini, thank you my dear young friend. You are appreciated greatly.

    • TIMETRAVELER2 profile image

      TIMETRAVELER2 4 years ago

      What a fun hub! I was going to write a similar one, but you beat me to it! Great job here, as is evidenced by the many comments you've received, including mine.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Time, write yours anyway; I forgot or left out a great deal. I'd love to read yours.

      Thank you!

    • Green Art profile image

      Green Art 4 years ago

      I also remember the Fuller Brush man in our kitchen talking to my mom.

      Hogan's Pharmacy in Madison, WI with the soda fountain that had hundreds of pieces of gum stuck under it's counter. I'd spin around on the stool while my ice cream float was being made. Wonderful to recall! Thanks for jogging memories of a simpler time.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Green Art, I loved the old soda fountains! LOL about the gum! Thank you for the visit!

    • rahul0324 profile image

      Jessee R 4 years ago from Gurgaon, India

      you talk of changes in tech and culture over the years... I have seen astonishing and ground breaking changes around me in the 22 years I have lived.....

      I have seen the demise of pagers and the vegetable vendors talking on cell phones...

      20 days of waiting for mails to video chatting ...

      proposals on paper to proposals on messages

      I mean so much has changed.. I don't know how many changes will I see through the rest of my life...

      Great hub Sir Bill

    • sgbrown profile image

      Sheila Brown 4 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

      I remember party lines and having to answer the phone with "Walker's residence. It was all about manners at my house. I remember the black and white tv and listening to the old radio. I used to standup next to my daddy when he was driving, how dangerous was that! Mom and I hung our clothes out on the line and ironed everything, even the sheets! I was the onlydishwasher my mom ever had. I remember daddy making home brew in a store room we had at the back of the house.

      Yes, I am getting old, but it is better than the alternative! Now I am going to grab my walker and go take my geritol. LOL

      Voted this up and awesome! Great job!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Rahul; sometimes I feel that technology is moving faster than man's ability to handle it properly. :)

      Thank you young man; you are greatly appreciated!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      SG......LOL.....great line. Make sure you don't hit any tree roots with that walker.

      I was just thinking yesterday about answering the phone in that manner. Now you might get a grunt if you are lucky.

      I'm not sure how I feel about the advances in technology, but at least I have a lot of good memories of a simpler time.

      Thank you!

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