ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Education and Science»
  • Economics

How far are we from a dystopia?

Updated on May 14, 2014

Not that far...


As children of democracies, we assumed too quickly that our environment was democratic. On which basis? Our pertaining to the league of the West? The champions? Compared to what? The other oppressed countries? What is oppression? Isn't it an individual and subjective concept? As well as freedom? In the current situation, are we oppressed or free? When a dictator takes control of the reins of a country, we know what to expect. What about a disguised democracy? Who can look in my eyes deeply and assert of a country of liberties (the use of the plural is conscious since its singular, regrouping all liberties, is shrinking and therefore aims at its abolition)? Are we facing the reconceptualization of the definition of democracy to make us believe that it is still a propos? If our votes were the expression of our concern, they elected the hands that are handcuffing and shackling us, that are walling us in and up? As a result, the individual (a commodity that will wither on the human market) will ponder whether once, we ever lived between the confident walls of democracy or was it ever an optical illusion adaptable at will? Is the idea of state interventionism shouldered by our president, the maternal womb symbolized in its idealistic protective obligation or the renewed version of the nightmarish matrix (developed for movie theaters)?

To the example of the allegory of Plato's cave, the U.S. citizens always believed that two simple pieces of paper, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights would guarantee ad vitam eternam the people to live in a democracy, the entitlement of freedom. It is to deny the superpower of the legislative and of the corporations. To the prisoners trapped in Plato's cave, the shadows shaping the outside world deformed their reality, distorted their perception without their knowledge. What were human beings passing by, with the game of light, became indicible and indistinct forms to them. We were always taught that our country was the epitome of democracy, that as soon as any boat entered Ellis Island, the statue of liberty and its ideals would embrace anyone reaching the shore. What is the difference between the prisoners in Plato's cave and us? None. Both perceptions were false. We are prisoners of a machine that stuff us with lies like those geese in Southern France to be served as foie gras to the regalian tables. Is it our destiny? To be served alive to the greed and hunger of capitalism?

From the famous Patriot Act to the suspicious H.R.347, to the daring CISPA, will we ever see an end to the implacable process of our enslavement? Which pill are they going to provide us to sedate our brains? Obama's charming smile, again? Will Al-Qaeda's ghost be due before election day to motivate our failed brains to vote for the party that will ensure national security? Which Manchourian candidate will our "protectors" send on the field to slaughter children in the ir kindergarden or have a carnage at the premiere of a movie theater? Will their agenda ever cross the U.S. citizens' path? In our dreams. You see where it leads people to dream? Ask Martin Luther King or Kennedy? The race against time and other nations' wealth to secure "our" national energy dependence, will force us to go along with any reforms or policies to be enforced in their favor. The pawns we became since September 11 assessed of our disposability.

Given the weakness of our governments, it is our duty as citizens not to forget. We are transformable at will, at the order of our commander in chief, himself at the mercy of the elite. A part of our youth will be melt in lead to advance on whatever military front, the other part will be standardized like any product at the end of the organizational structure of a Ford supply chain. Are we that far from the Aryan or Eugenist vision of the world, all blue-eyed, white-skinned, bright IQ, pure from any degeneration in our DNA code...? The poorest will simply be sacrificed. Collateral damage for the greater good will they brainwash us. An aseptic society is waiting for us where formol and ether-based programs will keep us in our established cubicles, rows. You open your mouth like Manning and Snowden and our "patriots" will ban you forever.

What we did not see afore, what we did not want to see before the involvement of the government in September 11: the use of the national army for private interests, the class and interests conflicts..., it is obvious now that the democracy that once existed or we thought existed, is not, that our vision of democracy is clashing with the one of the very superior whip creamed layer of the society. We are heading toward a sclerosal society where our unique power will be to protest or/and to vote. The power to protest is already jeopardized, we know what will be next! Our power to vote. As an electron, every human being aspires to freedom. What will trigger formations of protestation to rise if not the deprivation of freedom?

The society that was designed for us in the name of freedom responded to the people's urge to tackle the British empire taxation, to refrain an abusive mainland authority treatment of its so-called subjects. Nowadays it is more a reflection of a fortified autocracy hidden behind its crenellations on the lookout to the people's rebellion to shut down than any drawn contours of any democracy. In order to see our world the way it is (need to subdue people, simulated democratic system) and not the way we want it to be (a democracy) either we open our eyes, either we close them. Your pick. As for me, the ugliness of our society inspires me revolutionary thoughts and behavior (when time will come). The matrix will be beaten willy-nilly.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 3 years ago from USA

      Did you prefer Tsar Nicolas the second's absolute monarchy? Russians picked the revolution. They didn't die from starvation with collectivism. As for its development it is another story.

      Only Cubans from Florida are spitting on Castro; His rise was the demise of their privileges.

      Come on, make an effort. 1776, the US. 1789, France...

    • A.Villarasa profile image

      Alexander A. Villarasa 3 years ago from Palm Springs

      Come on Max----you think the Russian revolution improved the lot of ordinary citizens after communism got its clawed hold on the political/social/environmental/economic life of the Russian empire?

      And what about the Cuban revolution? Cubans even to this day are wanting to free themselves of the communist yoke/scourge imposed on Cuba by the brothers Castro and that certain Argentine doctor (Che Guevara) who became a cult figure during the 60's and 70's when armchair revolutionaries romanticized his death by printing his image on millions of shirts and thousand of pamphlets, and hundreds of billboards.

      I can name a lot more, but space is problematic even on HubPages.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 3 years ago from USA

      But you agree that once reached the point of no return (socio-economically) a revolution or demonstration (a suspended revolution) is inevitable in a long term projection.

      Name one revolution that didn't improve the human condition?

    • A.Villarasa profile image

      Alexander A. Villarasa 3 years ago from Palm Springs

      The Occupied Movement may initially have had a "legitimate" gripe against the political apparatus and the economic system it has an investment in , but once the movement devolved into what I termed in my other post as "soporific chaos", then its legitimacy evaporated as well.

      Revolutionary destructive creation or creative destruction. ... no matter how long you look at it revolutionary change is tinged, historically, with unimaginable human degradation and suffering.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 3 years ago from USA

      Capitalism legalized greed not vice-versa.

      Upon those socio-economical inequalities, we would agree that revolutions might appear as a direct consequence. That the occupied movement (since it's not a US exclusively movement) was a rationale answer to a certain socio-economical landscape of a country alpha at a time t in a spatial temporal continuity? If yes, then why are you discrediting its legitimacy?

      What about a destruction to create?

    • A.Villarasa profile image

      Alexander A. Villarasa 3 years ago from Palm Springs

      @Max:

      I absolutely agree with you that there are socio-economic inequalities in the USA.... and greed induced capitalism unfettered by moral introspection and unhinged from ethical considerations is running rampant in the societal landscape. But the Occupy Movement lost its bearing when it degraded into suporific chaos.

      So now, kindly elucidate me on what exactly do you mean by rebellion? are you thinking creative or destructive?

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 3 years ago from USA

      No they were not angry with the discrepancy between the elite and the lower classes, the ratio 1% possessing 90% of the national wealth is a fantasy, Wall-Street and the banks didn't benefit of handouts whereas when a commoner looses his house, does the government ruled by neocons save him? No....

      Oil cartels and co have subsidies whereas they're achieving billions in financial gains... Lobbies take care of their interests, who takes care of ours?

      We kill thousands worldwide, our freedom is infringed, our police is on the lookout,...

      Can't it justify anger? And therefore rebellion?

      Disregard for property that is insured, come on! And the only ones to do so would be governmental moles to discredit the movement.

      The only possibility for this movement not to be real would be that the government originated.

    • A.Villarasa profile image

      Alexander A. Villarasa 3 years ago from Palm Springs

      The Occupy Movement is a real movement? Really? Aside from the fact that those involved in that "movement" did not have any coherent vision or idea of what they were rebelling about, because they were so stoned and drunk out of their wits...Fox News had nothing to do with that. If they had any choate ideas, ideals or ideologies, they sure got drowned in the mix of drugs and alcohol and the disregard for human property and propriety.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 3 years ago from USA

      Which reality? That we are sheep? That any clown in the government can fool and abuse us without repercussions?

      This is the basis of your argumentation, one movement was more organized than the other? I think that you are ingurgitating too much fox news. Your attempt to delegitimize a real movement of rebellion among the American society discredits you as a serious contender in this farce of a debate.

    • A.Villarasa profile image

      Alexander A. Villarasa 3 years ago from Palm Springs

      @Max:

      Back to reality... The Boston Tea Partiers were patriots of the highest order. The Occupy Movement Partiers, were just having a sweet good time smoking pot, getting drunk, dirtying public parks, inconveniencing other folks.. and in some cases raping women.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 3 years ago from USA

      Let me refresh your failing memory, the Boston tea party was fighting the injustice of taxation. The occupy movement, the injustice of society when Wall Street and the banks take risks and fail, they are reimbursed whereas any lambda citizen will have to assume the responsibility and the consequences.

      Both protested, one led to the US independence whereas the other aborted with the intention to overthrow the puppet regime.

      Both movements expressed the anger of the people with the implemented policies etc...

    • A.Villarasa profile image

      Alexander A. Villarasa 3 years ago from Palm Springs

      @Max:

      To conflate the Boston Tea Party with the "Occupy movement" is as inchoate rationally as it is incomprehensible, historically.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 3 years ago from USA

      I don't see in what way it sounds so unrealistic. The 1773 Boston Tea Party is the perfect example. The occupied movement is another, more recent, if you still doubt.

      FEMA camps are a reality. Why mine wouldn't be? It's not because your head is not over your shoulders that mine isn't either.

    • A.Villarasa profile image

      Alexander A. Villarasa 3 years ago from Palm Springs

      @maX

      And you suggesting that you are going to be a revolutionary in words and in deeds is based on reality?. Really?

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 3 years ago from USA

      If I join Plato's cave where do you think you will be? A total lack of realism, that's the least I can say about you.

    • A.Villarasa profile image

      Alexander A. Villarasa 3 years ago from Palm Springs

      "As for me, the ugliness of our society inspires me revolutionary thoughts and behaviour(when time will come)."

      Is that empty bravado couched in linguistic insouciance?

      Matrix or not you better be prepared to join Plato in his cave.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 4 years ago from USA

      You are right, we are already in the matrix. We just don't know it. That's true in universal there's plenty of room but is there any soul to hear me???

    • profile image

      Ausseye 4 years ago

      Hi Maximum:

      Am a fan of bright minds

      It is, yes indeed, our duty to never forget the individual and their rights

      But gee blaming it on a man, well gosh you might be right

      So my thought of ‘ Oh Buma” might hold some sway even if he is

      Better than the most recent lies in the line

      Thinking of the statement of “ I have a dream of everyone…..”

      I hold the matrix as it is, right here, right now

      A bold site, a mind that might just make a difference

      Mind you if the cia dosen’t blow you brains into

      Universal space, plenty of room there to make your point

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 4 years ago from USA

      Are you the same person with a different identity complimenting me on my hubs but never advances a rational argumentation why he likes so much my hub!

    • profile image

      Kyle 4 years ago

      Max, you're an idiot.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      In what way a democracy is dangerous? Because most of the people belong to the mass? Because most of them vote against their interests and drag critical thinkers in their irrational behavior? Edward Barneys would probably have joined you in your opinion of the people!

    • mythbuster profile image

      mythbuster 5 years ago from Utopia, Oz, You Decide

      I like the treatment of the topic of democracy in this content, maxoxam41. North American regions are not that far off Orwellian levels of numbness while authorities slip ever more control over us - that is, if you are willing to take a good look around and call things as you see them instead of by politically correct phrases. Didn't Plato/Socrates also outline that Democracy is D-A-N-G-E-R-O-U-S? I think the word used by the ancient Western philosophers was "MOB," yet, in North America, we've been TRAINED to understand that Democracy means "freedom" instead of "responsibility, accountability and participation," so where I am going with all this..... well, maybe I just need to go hide from the mob soon before they think I am calling them un-free? It might be time now for me to go crawl back into my cave :)

      Thank you for the enjoyable content and material that demands critical thinking...

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      Is fiction that far from reality? Sometimes fiction inspires reality and vice-versa! My concern is when fiction is becoming reality.

      Hunger games is not my type of movies, I prefer political/thriller movies. Costa-Gavras's "Missing" is one of them.

      Given your writings, it is an honor for me that I count you as one of my reader.

    • Storytellersrus profile image

      Barbara 5 years ago from Stepping past clutter

      maxoxam41, I have been reading young adult literature for the past several months, writing reviews. Dystopias are a very popular genre for this population- did you see Hunger Games? It is an interesting study to consider all the horrific societies we could face. Reading these stories makes me appreciate our system, with all its failures! Thanks for a thought-provoking hub.

    • maxoxam41 profile image
      Author

      Deforest 5 years ago from USA

      Thank you girishpuri. It is flattering to be appreciated by an international reader!

    • girishpuri profile image

      Girish puri 5 years ago from NCR , INDIA

      Very much thought provoking, keep writing