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How to Measure Volume in a Density Experiment for Children

Updated on October 22, 2008

This is an overview of a density experiment provided by Heath Scientific.

The Dynamic Density Kit is a density experiment used to teach children how to measure volume and introduce the concept of density in an easy and fun experiment.

General Overview

Density is the amount of mass an object has per unit volume at a specific pressure and temperature. In determining density, it is necessary to calculate mass and volume as well. Mass is the amount of matter in a particular object. It is measured in grams. Volume is the amount of space an object occupies. Volume is measured by determining how much water an object displaces.

To determine density, mass is divided by volume. Since the purpose of the density experiment is to determine the density of different metals, the experiment will require determining the mass and volume of several objects and using simple arithmetic to determine density. This requires the child to measure the volume as well as the mass of certain objects.

Supplies

The density experiment is completed using the following:

• A spring scale

• A 50 milliliter graduated cylinder

• 4 different types metal balls with hooks

• String

• Paperclip

• Pipet

The graduated cylinder is used to measure volume for water as well as the different metal balls. Each line on the cylinder is the equivalent of 1 milliliter. If the water level lies between to lines, simply estimate the decimal place.

The spring scale can be hung from a ring stand or simply held in the hand. The scale measures in both newtons and grams. Since the density experiment requires mass to be determined, grams will be the measurement used. As with the graduated cylinder, if the reading falls between two lines, it is acceptable to estimate the value.

Experiment Procedure

The density experiment is conducted by filling the graduated cylinder with water, using the pipet to ensure the correct amount is in the cylinder. Each metal ball is lowered with the string into the water so the child can easily measure volume. The ball is removed from the water and weighed on the spring scale to calculate the mass. This measurement is combined with the value of volume using the formulas given during the overview. The density experiment is repeated for each metal ball to determine the density of each different metal.

This density experiment allows homeschooling parents to easily explain the concepts of mass, density, and volume without a large investment. Additionally, children are shown how to measure volume and use simple arithmetic to calculate the answer to relatively simple scientific questions.

Science project kits such as the density experiment are available from Heath Scientific’s website. These science projects cover a wide range of topics from volume and density to electricity. They offer a relatively inexpensive way for home schooling parents to enhance their child’s education. Additionally, they offer an easy way for parents to improve their home school curriculum as well take an active role in their child’s education by working the experiments alongside their child.

Founded by Pat and Heath Nichols, Heath Scientific is a provider of educational supplies located in Cedar Hill, Texas. Major suppliers of Heath Scientific include AntWorks, Thames & Kosmos, Uncle Milton, and Can You Imagine. If you are interested in hosting a school fundraiser, or obtaining science related educational tools, contact Heath Nichols at Heath Scientific by email at heath@heathscientific.net or by phone at (972) 291-4223.

Comments

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    • profile image

      kwasia 

      5 years ago

      oh okay lol

    • profile image

      naheed 

      7 years ago

      it doesn't help mee. ahh m woried!!!

    • profile image

      kb smith 

      7 years ago

      this is a horrible thing me and my child tried it and it did not work or help my child any

    • OrangeCast profile imageAUTHOR

      OrangeCast 

      9 years ago from Dallas, TX

      Say,

      Thank you for visiting and reading the article. We absolutely recommend the volume density experiment from Heath Scientific. The link provided in the article will take you to their website, where you can not only purchase this particular item but also see other products that they have.

      Let us know if you have any questions.

    • profile image

      Say 

      9 years ago

      Uhhh this isn`t really helping me.... do I have to buy the thing or what???

    • profile image

      sarah 

      9 years ago

      wwwwaaaaattttttt

    • allshookup profile image

      allshookup 

      9 years ago from The South, United States

      This is excellent!! More parents should do things like this. When parents get involved it encourages children to want to do more things like this. Great job!

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