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What do we know about nature

Updated on October 30, 2015

Just trees?

Most of the trees in the park near my house have already lost their leaves.

Overwhelmed by the elegant outlines of tree trunks and branches, one stops to drink in the etchings made by nature.

At some point, I realized that I understood what they are saying to me; in front of me I saw the trees not only as representatives of two different genders, but also as various ages and personalities.

I wanted to know whether separation of sexes existed among trees; it turned out to be true -- as usual, in nature not only two sexes were present, but also hermaphrodites could be found among trees as well.

So it was not by accident that I felt as if some trees appeared to me as flirtatious women, and some as typical teenagers; one tree seemed to be saying to me: "I am but a young boy."

A few trees were in a private state of mind, and yet some were chatty. I couldn't help but admire the Japanese for having lessons in "admiring nature;" not studying nature, but admiring it.

Ask our children whether they are familiar with names of trees. I doubt you would get a positive answer. Not every adult will tell you what sort of tree is in front of him - a poplar, an aspen, or a maple. Maple might be a little easier to identify, if only thanks to its leaf adorning the Canadian flag.

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      Karen Dillon 5 years ago

      This is an interesting and thoughtful piece of exploratory writing. Did you know the Japanese religion of Shintoism involves the belief that trees are actually spirits and at times are worshiped? Seems you were thinking along those lines yourself!

      Karen

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      eneva 5 years ago

      Its in many religions around the world and this is the one of the reasons of Crtistmas tree

      Thanks Karen

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