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Photographs and Identitification of Ontario Wildflowers Your Backyard

Updated on April 28, 2013

Nature's Bounty of Wildflowers in Ontario

Note: Click on pictures to enlarge photo

I am priviledged to have a backyard that borders into wilderness. No cultivated garden past my own yard yields many delights in the form of wildflowers, birds, insects and small animals.

This is what I left my city job for! I am giving myself time to decide if I should retire for good. Call it a Sabbatical. Living is cheap away from the maddening crowds. No more traffic congestion; just the wind in the trees and waking to the birds! One of my guilty pleasures is looking for wildflowers and photographing them for my own pleasure.

Ontario's wildflowers... they are everywhere,roadsides, fields even growing in crevices in pavement. Some are not loved because they tend to choke out other plants if they get the upper hand, others are more elusive to find and appreciated. While some wildflowers can be picked; most Ontarians know that a beautiful wildflower is best photographed rather than picked so it can reproduce and keep populating it's own natural habitat. NOTE: The trillium is Ontario's provincial flower...picking one is illegal (we love it, so please just enjoy them, photograph and enjoy them digitally later... wildflowers wilt and die very easily, but a photo lasts forever!.

In this Hub I will be sharing the wildflowers I find throughout this summer. I will add flowers periodically as I find, photograph and identify them. I may even add extra Hubs as my collection grows. Orignally the identification will be by the common names I know and eventually I hope to compile a more detailed identification. I plan for this to be a work in progress, an ongoing project which is close to my heart. I hope you enjoy my discoveries as much as I do!

The Wild Rose

Click to enlarge photo
Click to enlarge photo | Source

The Wild Rose

I will begin with the wild rose. It is found in other provinces other than Ontario. The province of Alberta has adopted the wild rose as it's provincial flower. The flower of this shrub species has five single petals and it's colours range from deep pink to light pink. At the moment, I do not know the official species of the rose I photographed, but i can say, no matter which species, I have always loved the scent of this lovely shrub. It spreads and can get rather bushy and beware it is pricky just like the roses in your garden!

Devil's Paintbrush

Devil's Paintbrush


This flower isn't particularly beautiful sitting by itself on a medium length hairy stem with leaves that grow from the base. Unless you look it closely...that is when you realize how colourful and pretty it is closeup! In a field where there are many flowers growing in masses it can look quite spectacular.

Although the Devil's Paintbrush is the common name in Ontario it is also called Orange Hawkweed.


Wild Blackberry Mixed with Silver Maple Shoots

Originally, I thought this was a raspberry plant but the berries are black and research makes it appear to actually be a blackberry bush....bonus!
Originally, I thought this was a raspberry plant but the berries are black and research makes it appear to actually be a blackberry bush....bonus! | Source

Wild Blackberry Flower


While the wild blackberry bush isn't beautiful and the woody canes are very scratchy with thorns, the flowers are quite showy. The raspberry bushes grow in dense clusters that grow several feet high.The spent flowers produce clusters of blackberries.

Meadow Buttercup

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Meadow Buttercup

What child hasn't picked a bouquet of Buttercups for Mom? These common flowers are everywhere and they even steal into flower gardens! if held under your chin, the shiny petals reflect the yellow colour onto your skin...something every Ontario child has experienced... "just because"!

Buttercups grow everywhere and it should not be too hard to find some! While the individual flowers are pretty, the stems are thin and leggy, the flowers look insubstantial against the backdrop of other vegetation.

Red Clover

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Red Clover

Red Clover smells sweet and is loved by bumblebees. The most common honey is harvested by bees from clover fields. Red clover is also used as feed for grazing animals and is cultivated by farmers to supplement feed.

Not only that It can be a good groundcover. My grandmother never wanted clover on her lawn to be mowed. I think she considered it good luck to have it in her garden.

Bird's Foot Trefoil

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Bird's Foot Trefoil

Bird's Foot Trefoil is no doubt named so since the flower sort of resembles a bird's foot!

I just recently identified this plant though I have seen it growing on roadsides for many years. I find this wildflower so colourful and vibrant I am encouraging a wild patch to establish itself in my garden.

Bindweed

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Bindweed

There are two species of Bindweed, Hedge False-Bindweed and Field Bindweed. They look similar so i am not certain which this one is. The flower is Morning Glory like and quite showy. I was pleased to find this one hidden among the grasses!

Bird Vetch

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Bird Vetch

This flower looks nice closeup, but is one of my least favourite wildflowers. Vetch twines around and knots unto other plants, clogs lawnmowers and looks a mess when it takes over a patch of vegetation. That said, butterflies and bees love it's nectar!

Wild Daisy

Source

Wild Daisy


This flower is called Oxeye Daisy and is one of the flowers gathered by children because it is so common. While it is considered a weed by farmers since it overtakes more useful forage plants for the grazing animals, it looks quite cheerful blanketing a hiilside with itd clean and bright white and yellow prescence!


references:

www.ontariowildflowers.com

Ontario Wildflowers by Linda Kershaw ISBN 13: 978-1-55105-285-4, ISBN 10: 1-55105-285-7



Comments

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  • Scribenet profile imageAUTHOR

    Scribenet 

    6 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    Hi That Grrl! I have found a few more...just have to get around to a new Hub on them.

    Thanks for commenting! Wildflowers are so lovely to find! Nice to find another person who photographs them as well! Thanks for commenting!

  • That Grrl profile image

    Laura Brown 

    6 years ago from Barrie, Ontario, Canada

    I get wild flower photos when I'm looking at abandoned farm houses. I don't always know what they are called. Nice that you have names for so many.

  • moonlake profile image

    moonlake 

    6 years ago from America

    Very beautiful flowers. Enjoyed your hub.

  • Scribenet profile imageAUTHOR

    Scribenet 

    7 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    Hi Sally. I am happy you liked the photos...I do enjoy taking them. Thanks for the info on the wild rose...I will add it to this hub shortly, since I didn't know if the wild rose hips could be used...guess I will be harvesting them :)...if as you said the birds leave me some!

    Thanks for the link...I will also check it out after I catch up here!

    Thank you for your kind comments! Cheers

  • Scribenet profile imageAUTHOR

    Scribenet 

    7 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    Hi Prasetio, sorry for the delay in answering your comments...I was away enjoying some more wildflowers, so the next Hub will be part two...more wildflowers of Ontario. I am glad you enjoyed these!

    Thanks for commenting! Cheers!

  • Sally's Trove profile image

    Sherri 

    7 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

    I enjoyed your photos so much! You are indeed lucky to have this changing beauty in your backyard.

    The wild rose is rosa rugosa, from which rose hips come. Be sure to watch this plant through the season as it forms hips after the petals fall. When the hips are bright red or red-orange, they are ready for harvesting, unless the birds get them first!

    You and your readers might enjoy this (scroll down the page to Wild Rose: rosa rugosa):

    http://students.umf.maine.edu/julie.adley/public.w...

  • prasetio30 profile image

    prasetio30 

    7 years ago from malang-indonesia

    I love gardening and all these flowers are beautiful. I really enjoy all stunning pictures here. Well done, my friend. Thanks for share with us. Vote it up!

    Prasetio

  • Scribenet profile imageAUTHOR

    Scribenet 

    7 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    Hi Movie Master! Nice to hear feedback that the wild rose is also in the UK! It is lovely to be sure...one of my favourites! I already have a few flowers for part 2, but I don't know the identity of some...so this will also be a fun learning experience for me!

    Thanks for stopping by! Cheers!

  • Movie Master profile image

    Movie Master 

    7 years ago from United Kingdom

    Hi Scribenet, lovely hub and beautiful photos of wildflowers, we have your wild rose here in the UK, they are called 'Dog roses' no idea why, but their beauty stand out in the hedgerows, I love them! I'm glad this is going to be an ongoing project and will look forward to part 2!

  • Scribenet profile imageAUTHOR

    Scribenet 

    7 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    Hi Alicia... It is great to know these wildflowers exist in British Columbia as well! This is going to be a fun project!

    I can hardly wait to get some more photos taken! Thanks for stopping by!

  • AliciaC profile image

    Linda Crampton 

    7 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

    Thank you for a lovely hub. The flowers in your photos, or their close relatives, grow here in British Columbia too. I'm looking forward to seeing more of your flower photos!

  • Scribenet profile imageAUTHOR

    Scribenet 

    7 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    Hi b. Malin! The photos are what inspired the hub! I love to take pictures of these ordinary wildflowers and highlight what I find beautiful about them. It is fun sharing!

    Thanks for stopping by and commenting! Cheers!

  • Scribenet profile imageAUTHOR

    Scribenet 

    7 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    Hi Tina, I am glad to hear some of these wildflowers also grow in Sweden! I know the roses grow in Finland and they are lovely there as well. I will find more as the summer goes on since they bloom at different times. Unfortunately, I missed the spring flowers and I could have missed some others, but that is the fun of doing this kind of hub! There is always one more to add!

    I do love wildflowers! Thanks for commenting! Cheers!

    Maggie

  • b. Malin profile image

    b. Malin 

    7 years ago

    Oh Scribenet, your Photos are Beautiful and so Educational to Read about them...and of course, I enjoyed your Hub as well...and Retirement is Fun!

  • thougtforce profile image

    Christina Lornemark 

    7 years ago from Sweden

    I also love wildflowers, at least the ones that don't take over the space completely:) Many wildflowers are very beautiful but many times they are not treated as they deserve. We can spend big amounts of money to buy not native flowers that needs a lot of extra care instead of using the wildflowers with much less job required. I am glad to say that I recognize many of the wildflowers mentioned in this hub and many of them is growing here too! Thanks for writing a hub for the wildflowers! Voted up.

    I look forward to see this hub growing, what a great idea!

    Tina

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