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Breeding and Raising for Phoenix Worms

Updated on September 17, 2009
Whitney05 profile image

Whitney has raised and bred different species of geckos, snakes, lizards, tortoises and other exotics since 2003

Phoenix Worms

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Flickr.com

Raising Phoenix Worms

Phoenix worms are relatively new in the market, but many herp lovers have tried them and find them easier to care for than other feeders out on the market today.

Some claim that phoenix worms are simply the most nutritious feeder insect out in the market today. They are packed with calcium and phosphorus. Their high calcium content and low fat, makes it an ideal feeder for gravid females and young reptiles. The high levels of calcium can allow the breeding female to retain and use more amounts of natural calcium for better egg production. Phoenix worms are slightly lower in protein than other feeders, but they do a good job making up for the lower protein levels with their high calcium levels.

Materials to keep Phoenix Worms

  • Plastic container
  • Phoenix Worms

Basic Setup for Phoenix Worms

Housing phoenix worms is relatively simple. These worms can be kept in the container that they came to you in, or placed in a new plastic container. Keep the lid on the cups. The special cup will allow the phoenix worms to have enough air and must be kept closed to ensure long shelf life.

Keep the worms at room temperatures. Do NOT refrigerate them because they have the longest shelf life at 60-70 degrees.

You do not need to feed the phoenix worms. They will be find for several weeks without pupating.

The sawdust that the worms are contained will suffice; no other bedding needs to be added. You can add a few drops of water to the bedding to keep it moist. Do not add too much water, as this can create mold and fungal growth because of high humidity levels in an enclosed area.

Breeding Phoenix Worms

As for breeding phoenix worms, there is conflicting information out there. Where some people say this type of worm CANNOT be bred, while other people say they can.

Cup of Pheonix Worms

Buying Phoenix Worms

When buying phoenix worms at a petstore, you will want to make sure to check inside the cup before you check out. As this feeder insect is not as well known as the mealworm, waxworm, or super worm, they tend to sit on the shelf longer, meaning sometimes there are more dead worms in the cup, than live. So, just make sure you check inside the cup before you leave the store.

Comments

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    • profile image

      Morgan 

      6 years ago

      It is possible to breed these. it is butterworms that are sterilized when imported from chile.

      Phoenix worms can be bred if you are within it's natural range. all you need to do is soak whole kernel corn for a few days, drain water, and set out. it will attract the Black Soldier flies, then you just feed it fruit, vegetables, stale bread...It is a naturally nutritional feeder. Feeding it kale might raise it's calcium level some.

    • profile image

      polypus 

      9 years ago

      phoenix worms are the larvae of the black soldier fly which is indigenous to the americas, and was naturalized throughout the rest of the world in the 1940s. you can breed them fairly easily, and they are an excellent composter.

    • profile image

      Kristina 

      9 years ago

      If you're talking about the video I think you're talking about, the maggot in the woman's head is a bot fly. Amazing creatures but creepy to have in your skin.

    • Whitney05 profile imageAUTHOR

      Whitney 

      9 years ago from Georgia

      Phoenix worms cannot be bred in the states. They are imported and during importation they are basically sterilized.

    • profile image

      vermiman 

      9 years ago

      They can be bred. They are the larvae of the Black Soldier Fly. Google it. Search for Biopod and "DIY BSFL bin"

    • profile image

      Taylor 

      10 years ago

      The video the person before was talking about is still there. If you click the arrow to the right once, it's the forth video listed. Pretty nasty.

    • profile image

      ASEFH 

      10 years ago

      Phoenix worms make a great addition to any herps diet, like Whitney said, they are high in protein but also high in calcium and phosphorus. I will still stick with crickets as a main part of my herps diet, feeding them mealworms, superworms and phoenix worms every so often, however, my gravid chameleon will get a bit more phoenix worms than the others. A great place to buy these is Ghann's.

    • Whitney05 profile imageAUTHOR

      Whitney 

      10 years ago from Georgia

      They make great staple diets. They are actually high in protein. You can use them as treats if you want. I tend to, as they're actually just a little too pricey for my tastes.

    • Jamberry profile image

      Jamberry 

      10 years ago from Anchorage, AK

      They look like large waxworms, but move as much as mealworms. Hmmm.

      Would these guys still be considered a kind of treat for reptiles, since they aren't very high in protein?

    • Isabella Snow profile image

      Isabella Snow 

      11 years ago

      Nice hub, Whitney.. but ewwww. ;)

    • profile image

      Rasstorra 

      11 years ago

      That's weird.it was in the you tube box then click the little arrow you know that it should be the first one after you click it !

    • Whitney05 profile imageAUTHOR

      Whitney 

      11 years ago from Georgia

      That's what I was thinking that you were talking about, but I couldn't find the video. Hm..

    • profile image

      Rastorra 

      11 years ago

      No, No, no. I know that .But once you finish watching the phoenix worms these other you tube clips pop up underneath it.Once the phoenix worms video clip is over!Then you click the arrow on the right side , some more video clips will pop up.Then you will see the "Lady with the Magot" in her head. I thought you knew?

      Any way just try it and see. talk ta ya later bye!

    • Whitney05 profile imageAUTHOR

      Whitney 

      11 years ago from Georgia

      I'm not sure what you're talking about... The video is of a cup of phoenix worms. They look a little like magets... ?

    • profile image

      Rastorra 

      11 years ago

      OMG,I WATCHED ALL THOSE VIDEOS BUT I THOUGHT I WAS GONNA HURL WHEN THERE WAS A MAGET IN HER HEAD. WHITNEY,PLEASE TELL ME THAT WASN'T REAL?

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