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Reasons to Earn a Master's Degree

Updated on March 16, 2015
A Master's degree is worth more than just an increased paycheck.
A Master's degree is worth more than just an increased paycheck. | Source

Earning a Master’s degree can be beneficial to individuals in many different career paths. This is particularly true in today's economy. A Master’s degree in can be an invaluable tool to help you stand out from your competition.

This type of degree can lead to substantially increased opportunities; a Master's degree is not just a piece of paper, it is a key to the future. You can use this key to help you unlock doors that will lead to jobs with better pay, growth potential and job security. Earning a degree does take time, but the rewards waiting at the end are well worth it.

Trainability

Employers are often impressed with candidates who have experience in the field, but these job seekers may have learned bad habits and may be unwilling to change and grow in their profession. However, a job seeker who has not only an undergraduate degree but a Master's degree suggests to the potential employer that this person is not afraid to learn new things, has a desire to improve themselves and is willing to work hard.

Individuals who earn a Master's degree demonstrate a level of capability and self-motivation that few others can match.
Individuals who earn a Master's degree demonstrate a level of capability and self-motivation that few others can match. | Source

Responsibilities

With a Master's degree, you are no longer confined to a low level job market. Now you can obtain a higher position offering more responsibilities, challenges and potential for growth. Of course, you also have the option to find another job in a completely different field. Many jobs in management require candidates to have a Master's degree; regardless, earning one will give you an added edge over the competition. Given the current state of the job market, finding a dream job means you must make every effort to better yourself; a higher education is one way to accomplish this.

Many employers look to Master's graduates to handle more responsibility than that delegated to other employees.
Many employers look to Master's graduates to handle more responsibility than that delegated to other employees. | Source

Intangibles

Of course, you also must consider the value of what you will earn while studying. A Master's degree will immerse you in a subject that you already love and will help enrich your life with what you learn. Additionally, while in school you will have many opportunities for networking. Your school will put you in contact with multiple professors who may know of job openings from their colleagues. Even if they do not have a job in mind for you, keep in touch with your professors and classmates – these people can make excellent professional references.

A Master's degree allows you to pursue your passion to a deeper level.
A Master's degree allows you to pursue your passion to a deeper level. | Source

Other Benefits

There may also be some internal job benefits to earning a Master's degree. Many organizations offer full or partial tuition reimbursement; they see a person going to school, improving their lives and becoming a more skilled employee as a positive for the company. Some of the work done on the job may be counted as earned credit for classes, so check with your professor to find out. Your boss may start to rely on you more and look for your advice; this reliance could lead to more responsibilities and even a raise in the future.

Do you think a Master's degree is worth the financial cost?

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Final Considerations

However, the most practical reason social workers should consider earning their Master's degree is simply that they will earn more money when they finish school. The job market is rough these days, and those with higher education have better job security. Simply put, a person who has a Master's degree in social work has an easier time finding work and keeping a job in the field.

What suggestions do you have for affording a Master's degree without breaking the bank?

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