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Spanish Lesson Sixty-Four: Using Participles As Adjectives

Updated on October 28, 2013

Hey Readers!

It's Monday again! You know what that means? Another Spanish lesson! I'm so excited about the next few lessons as we start learning more about the seven compound tenses in the Spanish language. I must say... these are parts of the language that I have forgotten over time, so I'm excited to go back over them and to teach you all as well. As you know, I love the Spanish language and I have a great deal of passion for it. I hope you all have enjoyed these lessons and that you too share my passion. So, thanks for reading and for following along. Leave me some comments, tell me how I'm doing. I'd love to hear some of your feedback.

Last week, we learned about the five senses. Basically, I taught you all have to discuss what you've seen, heard, smelled, felt, and tasted. Each of the verbs described were essential verbs in the Spanish lesson. I hoped you enjoyed that lesson. Today, let's discuss past participles a bit further.

Objectives

  • To Create and Recognize past participles
  • To Recognize Past Participles and Use them as adjectives
  • To Identify moments to use past participles as adjectives

Have You Ever Used A Participle As An Adjective?

See results

Perfect Indicative and Participles

Hey Readers

Thanks again for following these lessons. Just wanted to make sure you're aware that we have embarked on a new journey in our learning of the Spanish language. Now that we've finished all the singular tenses in the language, we've now started with the compound tenses. They all involve the verb "haber" which is an auxiliary or helping verb like our have and has. So remember that as we continue to learn.

We recently discussed the perfect indicative which is the first of the seven tenses on the compound end. Remember that we combine the conjugation of "haber" with the past participle to form the Perfect Indicative. We learned about the tense in Lesson Sixty-One. Review that lesson if you need to and join me in the lesson portion below.

English Word
Verb
Spanish Equiv
Opened
Abrir
Abierto
Absolved
Absolver
Absuelto
Covered
Cubrir
Cubierto
Said
Decir
Dicho
Written
Escribir
Escrito
Fried
Freír
Frito
Made/Done
Hacer
Hecho
Printed
Imprimir
Impreso
Dead
Morir
Muerto
Standing/Put On (Clothing)
Poner
Puesto
Resolved
Resolver
Resuelto
Broken
Romper
Roto
Satisfied
Satisfacer
Satisfecho
Seen
Ver
Visto
Returned
Volver
Vuelto

Today's Vocabulary

Hey Readers,

Today's vocabulary will mirror that from Lesson Sixty-One which will include a short list of irregular verbs in the past participle form. You've already read how to create a participle out of the verb form so you should be fine. Also, there is a list on that lesson of verbs who have two past participles. You can choose one of two if you'd like. So check out the chart, get familiar with the irregulars and remember the formula for turning a verb into a past participle.

Also, keep in mind, there are probably more verbs that are irregular than the ones listed. For conciseness, I've included just a short list. If you're unsure about other verbs, take a look online or in a book about Spanish verbs.

*If you haven't noticed, there are three columns to this list. The first is the English word, then the actual verb, and then the participle form of the word. So make sure you understand that. Another chart, with other words is provided following this section before the lesson.

English Word
Verb
Spanish Equiv
Absorbed
Absorber
Absorto
Blessed
Bendecir
Bendito
Confessed
Confesar
Confeso
Confused
Confundir
Confuso
Corrupt
Corromper
Corrupto
Chosen/Elected
Elegir
Electo
Suspended/Cancelled
Suspender
Suspenso
  • Most participles can be used as adjectives
  • They must agree with number and gender like all adjectives
  • If stem of the verbs ends in a vowel, an accent must be provided after it's changed.

Using Particples As Adjectives

Thanks for reading today.

Now that we've reached the lesson portion, I will reiterate the formation of a past participle. It's pretty simple, really.


For -Ar verbs: Remove the ending and add -Ado

For Er/Ir verbs: Remove the ending and add -Ido.


*Note: There are irregulars and those are shown in the charts on this lesson. There are others in addition to those displayed. If you're unsure, look them up. Now, let's take a look at using these participles as adjectives.


Compare and Contrast

Este libro está mejor escrito que Harry Potter. This book is better written than Harry Potter. Remember that "que" is used as "than" when comparing and contrasting two things. "mejor" is used as "better" in this particular sentence.


Like Or Dislike

No me gusta la letra impesa en Times New Roman. I don't like the letter printed in Times New Roman. Note that the past participle reflects the gender and number of the noun it modifies.


Use In Context

Mi mesa es rota. My table is broken. Note that the past participle follows "estar" or "ser" when directly describing an object, person, or animal.


Ask A Question

¿La puerta está abierta? Is the door open?


Passive Voice

La problema fue resuelta. The problem was resolved. Adding "ser" into the sentence creates a passive voice just like in English. Add "por" to describe the doer in the passive voice.

La problema fue resuelta por los estudiantes. The problem was resolved by the students.


Well that's today's lesson! Thanks so much for reading today! Oh! Next week, we will discuss Preterit Anterior tense in Spanish! See you next week!

© 2013 A.E. Williams

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    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      Very interesting; great hub. One of the exceptions in Spanish that always confused me pertains to the verb, hacer. For example, we were always taught that: “Hace mucho calor,” is said to mean, “it is very hot.” The verb, hacer, is used when describing weather; although I know that many say either that or the following: “Es muy calor.”

    • CrazedNovelist profile image
      Author

      A.E. Williams 3 years ago from Hampton, GA

      Yeah... that can be confusing... yes. It's most proper to say... Hace mucho calor because the weather "makes very hot". It's the literal definition. Spanish is tricky. ;)

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